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LIST OF HISTORICAL, ANTIQUARIAN, 

AND BIOGRAPHICAL WORKS. 

BY MR. NICOLAS: 

SOLD BY 

WILLIAM PICKERING, CHANCERY LANE. 



HISTORY OF THE BATTLE OF AGINCOURT, 

AND OF THE EXPEDITION OF HENRY V. INTO FRANCE, WITH 
THE ROLL OF THE MEN AT ARMS IN THE ENGLISH ARMY. 8vO. 

bds. Second edition. London, 1831. 

This edition of the History of the Battle of Agincourt has been nearly 
re-written, and many important additions have been made. Besides citing 
the authorities for each assertion in the author's narrative, the authorities 
themselves are translated and given at length at the end of the volume ; 
so that every thing which has been said by contemporary writers of both 
countries on the subject is collected, together with an account of the pre- 
parations for the expedition from the public records. 



THE PRIVY PURSE EXPENSES OF KING 
HENRY THE EIGHTH, FROM NOVEMBER, 1529, TO 

DECEMBER, 1532, WITH INTRODUCTORY REMARKS AND ILLUS- 
TRATIVE NOTES. 8vo. II. Is. London, 1827. 

" This volume presents an account of the sums paid out of the Privy 
Purse of King Henry the Eighth ; and as every payment, whether for the 
daily expenses of the Royal establishments, or for the gratification of his 
Majesty's wishes, is minutely noticed, it must be evident that they afford 
interesting information, not merely on the general Customs and Manners of 
the times, but on the personal character of that Monarch, his occupations, 
amusements, and places of residence. The MS. here printed contains what 
may be termed Henry's personal expenses, whether arising from his pur- 
chases, from his ' rewards' to those who brought him presents ; from his 
losses at dice, cards, bowls, and other games ; from his attachment to Anne 
Boleyn, or his favourite courtiers; or from the wages and liveries of his 
servants, fools, jesters, and other minions. Of Anne Boleyn and her family 
numerous curious particulars will be found, many of which tend to shew 
the manner in which she was treated at Court from November, 1529, until 
her elevation to the throne." Preface. 



III. 



THE PRIVY PURSE EXPENSES OF ELIZA- 
BETH OF YORK, AND THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 
EDWARD THE FOURTH. London, 8vQ. 1831. 

The Privy Purse Expenses of Elizabeth, the Consort of Henry the Seventh, 
in the last year of her life, contain notices of the sums paid for her travelling 
expenses, for her clothes, for the furniture of her palaces, for her jewels, for 
the support of her fools and minstrels, for her losses at cards, dice, and other 
games, for the attendance of her physicians, for the wages of priests, for gra- 
tuities to persons who brought presents, for her religious duties, and for the 
support of her sisters and their children, &c. many of which throw much light 
upon her personal character. 

The Wardrobe Accounts of Edward the Fourth are chiefly valuable for 
elucidating the manners, dresses, and furniture of our Ancestors in the 
15th Century, more particularly in relation to the Court, and to persons of 
rank ; and for the composition of Historical pictures, and for the stage. 

The Memoirs of Elizabeth of York, and of her Sisters, and the Introduc- 
tory Remarks which are prefixed to the volume, present new facts, and, it is 
presumed, correct many important errors in the History of the Reigns of 
Edward the Fourth, Richard the Third, and Henry the Fourth. Preface. 



JOURNAL OF THE EMBASSY OF THOMAS 
BECKINGTON, SECRETARY TO HENRY vi. AFTERWARDS 

BISHOP OF BATH ; SIR ROBERT ROOS, BANNERET ; AND SIR 
. EDWARD HULL, K. G. TO NEGOTIATE A MARRIAGE BETWEEN 
THE KING AND A DAUGHTER OJf THE COUNT OF ARMAGNAC IN 
1442. WITH AN INTRODUCTION AND ILLUSTRATIVE NOTES. 

The MS. printed, and where necessary, translated in this volume is no less 
interesting to the Antiquary than valuable to the Historian. It contains 
every particular relative to an event which has been but briefly noticed, and 
presents much curious information on the Manners and Customs, and State 
of the Arts in the middle of the Fifteenth century. Besides mentioning where 
Beckington dined and supped every day, the names of his host and guests, 
and other equally minute facts, descriptive of his voyage and journey, it 
contains a copy of all Letters sent and received by him connected with his 
mission, including several fiora HENRY THE SIXTH of considerable interest. 
The Ambassadors proceeded from Windsor to Plymouth, where they em- 
barked for Bourdeaux, and on their return landed at Falmouth. From the 
paucity of Historical documents relating to the reign of Henry the Sixth, 
the information afforded by this MS. on many subjects, but more particularly 
on the state of Bourdeaux and its vicinity, when visited by Beckington, is 
well deserving of attention. 



MEMOIR OF AUGUSTINE VINCENT, WINDSOR 

HERALD, TEMP. JAMES THE FIRST. WITH THE ADDENDA. Cr. 

8vo, 5s. London, 1827. 

" The merits of Augustine Vincent, the particulars of whose life- are now 
for the first time collected, are well known to all who can appreciate the ser- 
vices which he has rendered to antiquarian and genealogical researches ; nor 
is his name unknown to more general readers, from the part which he took 
in the celebrated controversy between Camden and Ralph Brooke, which 
dispute is here fully canvassed." Preface. 



MEMOIRS OF LADY FANSHAWE, WIFE OF SIR 

RICHARD FANSHAWE, BART. AMBASSADOR FROM CHARLES THE 
SECOND TO THE COURTS OF PORTUGAL AND MADRID. WRITTEN 
BY HERSELF, WITH AN INTRODUCTORY MEMOIR AND NOTES. 

Second Edition, 1830. 



CATALOGUE OF THE HERALD'S VISITA- 
TIONS, WITH REFERENCE TO MANY OTHER VALUABLE GE- 
NEALOGICAL AND TOPOGRAPHICAL MSS. IN THE BRITISH MU- 
SEUM. 8vo, 5s. Second Edition. London, 1825. 

" It is the object of this compilation to form an exact and convenient book 
of reference to the copies of the Herald's Visitations in the British Museum. 
Besides the many valuable collections noticed under the different counties, a 
list is given of those genealogical and Jppographical MSS. which relate to 
Scotland, Ireland, and Wales, and to the few connected with foreign pedi- 
grees. At the end an account is given of such Heraldic MSS. as would be 
of almost constant reference if they were generally known." Preface. 



OBSERVATIONS ON THE PRESENT STATE 
OF HISTORICAL LITERATURE, ON THE SOCIETY 

OF ANTIQUARIES, AND OTHER INSTITUTIONS FOR ITS ADVANCE- 
MENT IN ENGLAND ; WITH REMARKS ON RECORD OFFICES AND 
ON THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE RECORD COMMISSION. ADDRESSED 
TO THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR THE HOME DEPARTMENT, 

8vo, 1830. 7s. 6d. 



PRIVY PURSE EXPENSES 



of gorfc, 



ETC. 



PRIVY PURSE- EXPENSES OF 



of 

WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 

CUtoarto fi)e jfottrtlj. 

WITH A MEMOIR OF ELIZABETH OF YORK, AND NOTES. 

BY NICHOLAS HARRIS NICOLAS, ESQ. 




LONDON: 

WILLIAM PICKERING. 
MDCCCXXX. 



484549 



is.i. 



HI 

N53 



LONDON : 

PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES, 
Stamford Street. 



TO 
THE RIGHT HONORABLE 

PERCY CLINTON SYDNEY SMYTHE, 

VISCOUNT STRANGFORD AND BARON PENSHURST, 

KNIGHT GRAND CROSS 

OF THE MOST HONORABLE MILITARY ORDER OF THE BATH, 
AND OF THE ORDER OF THE GUELPHS OF HANOVER, 

AS A MARK OF RESPECT FOR 

HIS HISTORICAL ACQUIREMENTS, AND OF 

GRATITUDE FOR HIS FRIENDSHIP, 

THIS VOLUME 

IS DEDICATED 
BY HIS OBLIGED AND FAITHFUL SERVANT, 

THE EDITOR. 



PREFACE. 



THE value of "Privy Purse Expenses" of our 
Sovereigns, in illustration of History, having been 
so frequently pointed out, it is unnecessary to urge 
the utility of this volume. 

It has been edited upon the same plan as the 
" Privy Purse Expenses of King Henry the Eighth," 
which were published about three years ago, since 
which time numerous records of a similar de- 
scription have been brought to light, the greater 
part of which are scattered in various repositories, 
and others are in the hands of private individuals. 
Whenever the Government may think that the 
muniments of the Country should be rendered 
available for the elucidation of History, manu- 
scripts of this nature ought to be among the first 
which are collected and indexed, even if they be 
not published by its authority. It is proper to 
notice that copious extracts from the Privy Purse 
Expenses of King Henry the Seventh, between 



PKEFACE. 



December, 1491, and March, 1505, have been 
recently printed in the " Excerpta Historica," 
which are interesting additions to those of his 
Queen ; and that similar accounts of the Prin- 
cess, afterwards Queen, Mary, are in preparation 
by Mr. Madden, of the British Museum, than 
whom a more able Editor could not be desired. 

In this volume, Memoirs of Elizabeth of York, 
and of her sisters, will for the first time be found, 
all of whom have been unaccountably neglected by 
historical writers. These Memoirs present new 
facts, and it is presumed correct many important 
errors, in the History of the Reigns of Richard the 
Third and Henry the Seventh. 

For assistance in the compilation of the Notes, 
the Editor is much indebted to his friends the 
Reverend James Dallaway, and John Gage, of 
Lincoln's Inn, Esq., to whom, and to Charles 
George Young, Esq., York Herald, for the exer- 
cise of his wonted kindness, he offers his warmest 
thanks. 

20M November, 1830. 



INTRODUCTORY REMARKS. 



THE Accounts which are contained in this volume 
afford considerable information about the latter part 
of the reigns of Edward the Fourth and Henry the 
Seventh; and besides illustrating the manners of 
the period, they throw light upon some points of 
History, as well as upon the characters of Elizabeth 
of York and her consort King Henry the Seventh, 
and abound in notices of other eminent individuals. 

WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF KING EDWARD 
THE FOURTH. 

The WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF KING EDWARD 
THE FOURTH from the 18th April to the 29th Sep- 
tember, 1480, though preceding, in point of time, 
the Privy Purse Expenses of Elizabeth of York, are 
placed at the end of the volume, because they are 
inferior in interest ; and as might be expected, 
they are chiefly valuable for the descriptions which 
they contain of the costume of the monarch and his 
court, for which purpose they were consulted by 
the laborious Strutt. The original manuscript is 
now in the Harleian Collection in the British Mu- 

b 



11 REMARKS ON THE WARDROBE 

seum, and is numbered 4780, but extracts from it 
only have been thought necessary for publication, 
because the Inventories are repeated, and many 
statements of a mere official nature are introduced, 
which it is not desirable to print at length. All 
the articles therein mentioned, together with the 
names of persons, have been carefully copied ; and 
little as such a record might appear to promise of 
historical facts, it establishes one of very great im- 
portance. 

The Accounts commence with a statement of the 
money received and expended for the King's ward- 
robe. Each article is minutely described, and the 
impressions created by the perusal are those of ad- 
miration at the splendid appearance which persons 
of rank must have presented, and of surprise at 
the accuracy with which the delivery or purchase 
of every trifle is recorded. Explanations of the 
various things mentioned will be found in the 
notes; and though they were compiled with great 
labour, there are a few entries which could not be 
illustrated, because words occur which it is presumed 
have not been discovered in any other manuscript, 
and it is seldom that a solitary example of the use 
of a word enables an editor to satisfy himself of its 
precise import. 

Among the more interesting passages is the list 
of some of Edward the Fourth's books, with a 
description of their magnificent bindings. The price 
of wages to workmen seems to have varied from 



ACCOUNTS OF EDWARD IV. Ill 

four-pence to six-pence a day, and the pay of the 
Clerk of the Wardrobe was only a shilling. Infor- 
mation will be found about the equipment of the 
suite, and of the horses of the King ; and the idea 
which the illuminated MSS. of the fifteenth century 
afford of the gorgeous appearance of a tournament, 
or other assembly of nobles on festive occasions, is 
corroborated by these descriptions. It was always 
the practice for the sovereign to present liveries 
to the officers of his household, and his favourites, 
and the notices of such presents are deserving of 
attention, from their shewing the great change 
which three centuries have produced in the feelings 
and usages of society. To Lord Howard, after- 
wards the first Duke of Norfolk, and " the Jocky of 
Norfolk" of Shakespeare, his royal master gave nine 
yards of black velvet ; and to the heir-apparent of 
the Earl of Kent, for his marriage, a gown of blue 
velvet. Gowns were also given to the Marquess 
of Dorset and to Earl Rivers ; and coverings for bri- 
gandines were given to Lord Audley, to Sir Thomas 
Montgomery and to Sir Thomas Borough, two 
Knights of the Garter. 

Most of the persons thus favoured were relations 
either of the King or of Elizabeth Wydeville his 
Queen, and the others held situations in the house- 
hold. The Prince of Wales, afterwards King Ed- 
ward the Fifth, and his brother the Duke of York, are 
mentioned as having received, the former, five yards 
of white cloth of gold tissue, and the latter, by the 

b2 



IV REMARKS ON THE WARDROBE 

hands of his chamberlain, several yards of purple 
velvet, black and green satin, and sarcenet for 
gowns, as well as a mantle of the Order of the 
Garter. 

The slightest glance over these Accounts must 
establish their value in elucidating the manners, 
dresses, and furniture of our ancestors, and more 
particularly in relation to the court and to persons 
of rank, towards the close of the fifteenth century. 
For the composition of historical pictures, and for 
the stage, such a record is of the greatest utility ; 
and even if it were confined to points which, with 
the superciliousness of ignorance, it may be said 
are only worthy of the attention of a frivolous anti- 
quary, its value in illustration of history would 
nevertheless be considerable. 

It is as requisite for an Historian to be intimately 
acquainted with the customs of the age of which 
he writes, as for a traveller to reside some time in a 
country before he attempts to describe the inhabit- 
ants, lest he may consider peculiarities in dress or 
conduct, which arise from personal caprice, as part 
of the national character. This is fully exemplified 
in the instance of a learned historian of the present 
day, who, in treating of the character of Richard 
the Third, ascribes to him a love of splendid clothes 
and a taste for pomp, which in fact belonged to the 
age and not to the individual. Of the mandate to 
the Keeper of the Wardrobe to send various dresses 
to the King at York, that writer says, " Richard 



ACCOUNTS OF EDWARD IV. 



specifies these with an exactness and descriptive 
detail, as if they were as minutely registered in his 
manly memory as in that of the Queen's mistress of 
the robes. The abundance and variety of what he 
sends for, imply a solicitude for his personal exhi- 
bition, which we should rather look for from the 
fop that annoyed Hotspur than from the stern and 
warlike Richard ; but it was the foible of his heart, 
and like all the secret idols of our self-love, it kept 
its station within its interior temple, however bus- 
tling and contrasted might be the living scenery 
that surrounded it 1 ." Again : " the King's splen- 
dour necessarily outshone the duke of Buckingham's, 
and from Richard's peculiar taste was ostentatiously 
displayed. The ducal fop was transcended by the 
royal coxcomb," &c. " Richard enjoyed his own 
pomp with too much self-complacency to think of 
the duke's feelings on this subject, unless to be 
secretly gratified with his own superiority." " His 
fastidious use and display of his regal state revealed 
too large a personal vanity to create attachment. 
Every one has too much of this weakness to endure 
it from another, and as the pomp of Richard was 
too expensive for the less affluent of the gentry, and 
too self prominent not to make the wealthier feel a 
great comparative diminution in his presence, it 
increased instead of abating his personal unpopu- 
larity 2 ." 

1 Sharon Turner's " History of England," vol. iii., p. 479. 
8 Ibid., vol. iv., p. 76. 



VI REMARKS ON THE WARDROBE 

These inferences with respect to the character 
of Richard the Third are, it is submitted, drawn 
from a mistaken estimate of evidence, rather than 
from erroneous data ; and they prove the neces- 
sity of an historian not merely using research, but 
of being able to attach a proper value to his mate- 
rials. The grounds upon which the opinion of 
Richard's vanity is built are the account of the arti- 
cles delivered out of the Wardrobe for his corona- 
tion, the descriptions of Chroniclers of his pompous 
appearance on public occasions, and the clothes for 
which he sent from York. Viewed without refer- 
ence to similar documents in previous and subse- 
quent reigns, the conclusion is natural, that the 
sovereign to whom they relate was a " vain cox- 
comb," especially if the opinion be just that that list 
was prepared by the monarch himself. But when 
records of this nature are compared with others, 
and it becomes evident that the splendid dresses 
worn by Richard formed the general costume of 
persons of rank of the age, and when the minuteness 
of detail which is ascribed to his own taste is 
proved to be the usual form in which Wardrobe- 
keepers and their officers entered the articles en- 
trusted to their custody, the error of supposing that 
the splendour or the accurate description of the 
robes are in any degree indicative of Richard the 
Third's character is manifest. A reference to these 
Wardrobe Accounts, or to any other list of apparel 
or jewels, in the fourteenth, fifteenth, and sixteenth 



ACCOUNTS OF EDWARD IV. Vll 

century, will prove that there is not a single cir- 
cumstance connected with Richard which justifies 
the opinion that he was more fond of splendour and 
parade than his predecessors, much less that he was 
either a " fop" or a " coxcomb." 

It is only by comparing one record with another, 
and devoting much labour to the inquiry, that accu- 
rate conclusions on the characters of individuals of 
the middle ages can be formed. Man is wise, vir- 
tuous, and humane, or silly, vain, and wicked, in 
comparison with his contemporaries. He must be 
estimated, not by the standard of morality erected 
several centuries after his death, but by the standard 
of the age and country in which he lived. There 
is not, for example, a greater want of mental deli- 
cacy in the female savage whose person is exposed, 
than in the European woman whose form is nearly 
concealed ; but educate that savage and transport 
her to Europe, and if she refuse to imitate the 
females by whom she is surrounded, she may then, 
but not until then, be charged with indelicacy. If 
Richard was the first monarch who was splendidly 
attired, or if his subjects did not imitate him as far 
as their purses or the laws permitted, there would 
be some justice in accusing him of vanity ; but a 
love of splendour in apparel was so peculiar a cha- 
racteristic of the middle ages throughout Europe, 
that it was restrained in England by various sump- 
tuary statutes. 

It is sufficiently evident that Wardrobe Accounts 



Vlll REMARKS ON THE WARDROBE 

are of much greater value in illustration of History 
than is generally supposed ; and an important fact 
which is established by those here printed will now 
be stated. 

Margaret of York, the sister of King Edward the 
Fourth, married Charles Duke of Burgundy on the 
9th July, 1468. This princess is memorable for the 
annoyance which she caused to Henry the Seventh 
by countenancing Perkin Warbeck, who personated 
her nephew, the Duke of York, and more especially 
for the support which she afforded to the impostor. 
Historians assert that the duchess tutored him in 
the part he was to perform, by giving him accurate 
information of her brother's court, " describing unto 
him the personages, lineaments, and features of the 
king and queen, his pretended parents, and of his 
brother and sisters, and divers others that were 
nearest him in his childhood; together with all 
passages, some secret, some common, that were 
fit for a child's memory, until the death of King 
Edward. Then she added the particulars from the 
time of the king's death until he and his brother 
were committed to the Tower, as well during the 
time he was abroad, as while he was in sanc- 
tuary y &c. 

Upon this passage Horace Walpole remarks, 
" Indeed ! Margaret must in truth have been a Juno, 
a divine power, if she could give all these instruc- 
tions to purpose. This passage is so very import- 

1 Bacon's " History of Henry the Seventh." 



ACCOUNTS OF EDWARD IV. IX 

ant, the whole story depends so much upon it, that 
if I can shew the utter impossibility of its being 
true, Perkin will remain the true Duke of York for 
any thing we can prove to the contrary; and for 
Henry, Sir Thomas More, Lord Bacon, and their 
copyists, it will be impossible to give any longer 
credit to their narrations. I have said that Duke 
Richard was born in 1474. Unfortunately his aunt 
Margaret was married out of England in 1467, 
seven years before he was born, and never returned 
thither" Walpole then triumphantly asks, " Was 
not she singularly capable of describing to Perkin 
her nephew whom she had never seen? How well 
informed was she of the times of his childhood, and 
of all passages relating to his brother and sisters ! 
Oh ! but she had English refugees about her. She 
must have had many, and those of most intimate 
connection with the court, if she and they together 
could compose a tolerable story for Perkin, that was 
to take in the most minute passages of so many 
years 1 ." He then observes, that " twenty-seven years 
at least had elapsed since Margaret had been in 
the court of England," and concludes his argument 
in words which shew that he deemed it unanswer- 
able : " If Margaret was Juno, he who shall answer 
these questions satisfactorily, ' erit mihi magnus 
Apollo.'" 

Next to Walpole and Laing, the strongest advo- 

1 " Historic Doubts," pp. 82-84. 

c 



X REMARKS ON THE WARDROBE 

cate of the identity of Warbeck with the Duke of 
of York, is the historian of the Tower of London, 
who has discussed the question 1 with great zeal, but 
without throwing light upon the subject. An argu- 
ment of so conclusive a nature as that the Duchess 
of Burgundy could not possibly have tutored War- 
beck, because she had not been in England for 
twenty-seven years, during which time the children 
of Edward the Fourth were born, and that so serious 
an error weakens the other statements of the writers 
who have committed it, is strongly pressed by the 
disciples of Horace Walpole. Mr. Bayley observes, 
" How the duchess could have selected this young 
man for his likeness to her nephew, the Duke of 
York ; how she could have described to him the 
persons of his brother, his sisters, and others nearest 
him in his childhood ; how she could have given him 
minute details of the affairs of England, and how 
she could have instructed him in what passed while 
he was in the sanctuary at Westminster, and more 
especially of the transactions in the Tower, would 
be difficult to imagine : for this princess, who is 
represented as bitter against Henry, was married 
out of England in 1467, before either of Edward 
the Fourth's children was born, and as she never 
returned, she could never have seen the Duke of 
York, his brother, or either of the princesses, nor 
could she have had such knowledge of the extraor- 

1 " History of the Tower of London," by John Bayley, Esq., 4to., 
pp. 347-352, and second edition, 1830, p. 349. 



ACCOUNTS OF EDWARD IV. XI 

dinary chain of events that had since occurred in 
England, as would have made her a capable instruc- 
tress of a Flemish youth in the wily and difficult 
course he would have to tread 1 ." 

It is much easier to draw conclusions from pre- 
sumed premises than to examine into the truth of 
the premises themselves ; and had half the inge- 
nuity which some writers have displayed in sup- 
porting a favourite hypothesis, been bestowed on an 
investigation of the evidence on which they build 
it, the history of England would not be so disfigured 
by errors and absurdities. 

Nothing could be more satisfactory than the argu- 
ment which has been quoted, for disbelieving that 
the Duchess of Burgundy tutored Warbeck, were 
it not certain that the Duchess paid her brother's 
court a visit in July or August, 1480_, less than 
three years before Edward's decease. 

On the 24th July, sheets, fustians, blankets, 
arras, travasses, &c., were sent to Greenwich and 
Coldharbour, " against the coming thither of my 
Lady Duchess of Bourgoigne 2 ," and green sarcenet 
was issued from the Wardrobe to make a traverse 
for the Duchess' chapel at Coldharbour 3 , to which 
place hooks and other materials for hanging tapestry 
were also forwarded, in expectation of her arrival, 
and of the arrival of the ambassadors of Burgundy 4 . 
To the Master of the King's Barge a gown of black 

1 Bayley's " Tower of London," p. 350. 
1 p. 141-2, and p. 132. p. 144. 4 p. 145. 

c 2 



XU REMARKS ON THE WARDROBE 

camlet was delivered on the same day, " against the 
Duchess' coming." The said master and twenty-four 
bargemen received sixteen yards of blue and murrey 
cloth, being the colours of the livery of the house 
of York, and forty-eight small roses embroidered, 
to make jackets, which were to be garnished with 
small roses ; four other persons receiving on the 
same occasion eight large embroidered roses, 
" against the coming to London of the Duchess of 
Burgundy 1 ." On the 26th, green velvet, garnished 
with aglets of silver gilt, bordered with spangles, 
for horse harnesses, together with crimson velvet for 
covering head-stalls and reins for ten hobies and 
palfreys, which articles the King presented to the 
Duchess, were issued by the Wardrobe-keeper 2 . 

The Duchess of Burgundy remained in London, 
being lodged at Coldharbour, until the end of Sep- 
tember; and on the 18th of that month, Sir Edward 
Wydeville the King's brother-in-law, Sir James 
Radclyffe, knights of the body, Darcy, Tay, Wil- 
liam Berkeley and Roger Vaughan, esquires of the 
body, obtained an order for the delivery of purple 
velvet and purple satin, for their jackets against 
the Duchess' return, they being appointed to attend 
her 3 ; for which purpose jackets of woollen cloth, of 
the colours murrey and blue, were given to one 
hundred other persons, many of whom were gentle- 
men and servants of the household 4 . Previous to 

1 p. 166. * p. 153, and p. 125. *p. 165. * pp. 163-4-5. 






ACCOUNTS OF EDWARD IV. XU1 

her departure, a magnificent pillion, " against her 
going into Flanders again," was provided 1 . The 
Duchess appears to have been treated with the most 
marked respect and attention during her stay in 
this country, which lasted, as near as the dates 
admit of the inference, upwards of six weeks. In 
her suite was the Argentier of France, to whom, on 
the 16th August, and "to divers estates and gentles 
being attending and awaiting" upon the person of 
the Duchess, were given several yards of cloth of 
silver, scarlet, violet cloth, and black velvet 2 . 

The only Chronicle yet printed in which the 
Duchess of Burgundy's visit to England is noticed, 
is in one lately edited, entitled " the Chronicle of 
London," where the circumstance is thus alluded to : 
" Anno 20 Edw. IV. Also this yere the Duches 
of Burgoyne came into England to see the Kyng 
her brother, which shewed to her great pleasure ; 
and so she departid ageyne 3 ." 

Though the object of the Duchess of Burgundy's 
coming is there said to be " to see the King," it was 
probably intimately connected with the negociation 
then entered into with that duchy ; but the positive 
evidence that she passed many weeks in England 
within so short a period of the death of Edward the 
Fourth, when all his children were living, and when 
the Prince of Wales was ten years old, and his 
eldest sister the Princess Elizabeth fourteen, is 

i p. 163. * p. 160. 

3 p. 147, 4to., London, printed in 1827. 



XIV WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF EDWARD IV. 

highly valuable, because it completely negatives 
the assertion that the Duchess could not have given 
Warbeck the knowledge he possessed of the royal 
family. By destroying that hypothesis, the state- 
ments of Lord Bacon and other writers, that Perkin 
derived his information from her, is restored to its 
original value, and the probability that he was an 
impostor is of course increased. It is true that the 
presence of the Duchess at her brother's court in 
August. 1480, would not have enabled her to ac- 
quaint Warbeck with what passed while the Duke 
of York was in the sanctuary at Westminster, or 
with the transactions in the Tower ; but his infor- 
mation on these points was of so general a nature, 
that he might easily have obtained it from Mar- 
garet's agents. 



PRIVY PURSE EXPENSES OF ELIZABETH OF YORK. 

THE remarks by which the PRIVY PURSE EXPENSES 
OF ELIZABETH, THE QUEEN OF HENRY THE SE- 
VENTH, will be illustrated, chiefly consist of bio- 
graphical notices of the children of King Edward 
the Fourth, because these Accounts relate to, and 
throw much light upon, their history ; and because 
all previous notices of them are extremely imper- 
fect. 

King Edward the Fourth married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Sir Richard Wydeville, and widow of 
John Lord Grey of Groby, at Grafton, in Northamp- 
tonshire, on the 1st May, 1464, and by her had 
issue, three sons, Edward, Richard, George, and 
seven daughters, Elizabeth, Mary, Cecily, Marga- 
ret, Anne, Katherine, and Bridget. 

I. EDWARD, PRINCE OF WALES, was born on 
the 14th November, 1470, and his unhappy history 
as King Edward the Fifth is too well known to 
require any farther notice of him. All which occurs 
about this prince in the Wardrobe Accounts of 1480 
is an entry of the delivery of some yards of cloth of 
gold tissue. The articles issued from the Wardrobe 

o 

for him to wear at the coronation of his uncle 
Richard the Third, are commented upon in Wai- 
pole's " Historic Doubts." 



XVI REMARKS ON THE PRIVY PURSE 

II. Richard of Shrewsbury. The date of the birth 
of this prince has not been exactly ascertained, but 
it may be assigned to the year 1472 1 . As early as 
the 28th May, 1474, he was created Duke of York, 
and on the 7th February, 1476-7, he was created 
Duke of Norfolk and Earl Warren. On Thursday, 
15th January, 1477-8, he espoused Ann, the daughter 
and heiress of John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, she 
being then about six and he about four years of age. 
A description of the ceremony on the occasion is 
printed in Sandford's " Genealogical History of the 
Kings of England," from a MS. in the College of 
Arms. The duke was appointed Lieutenant of Ire- 
land for two years, on the 5th May, 1479, and in 
the instrument nominating his deputy, he is styled, 
" Ricardus secundus films Illustrissimi Principis 
Edw: quarti, &c., Dux Ebor: et Norff: Comes 
Warren: Surr: et Nottingham: Comes Marescallus, 
et Marescallus Angliae, ac Dominus de Segrave, de 
Mowbray, et de Gower." The Wardrobe Accounts 
for 1480 contain the following entries relating to 
the young prince. A horse harness and saddle of 
crimson velvet, and cloth of gold 2 , together with 
cloth of gold, velvet and satin for his gowns, were 
delivered to his chamberlain Sir Thomas Grey 3 ; and 
a mantle of the Order of the Garter was issued for 
his use on the 17th August, which perhaps fixes the 
date of his installation to about that time 4 . He is 

1 Hall's " Chronicle," ed. 1809, p. 345. 
* p. 155. pp. 156 and 160. 4 p. 161. 



OF ELIZABETH OF YORK. XVil 

supposed to have been murdered with his brother 
in the Tower, though some writers have contended 
that he escaped, and was the individual so well 
known in history as Perkin Warbeck. 

III. GEORGE OF SHREWSBURY, the third son, 
was born at Shrewsbury, and was created Duke of 
Bedford in his infancy, but he died soon afterwards, 
and was buried at Windsor. 

The daughters were, 

I. ELIZABETH OF YORK, afterwards Queen of 
Henry the Seventh, a memoir of whom will be found 
in a subsequent page. 

II. MARY OF YORK, the second child of Edward 
the Fourth 1 , was born at Windsor, in August, 1466, 
and Cardinal Bourchier, Archbishop of Canterbury, 
was one of her sponsors 2 . On the 9th of October, 
1468, 400/. a year were granted to her mother the 
Queen for the expenses of the Princesses Eliza- 
beth and Mary, but nothing more is known of 
her than the statement of Sandford, that she was 
present at the marriage of her brother the Duke of 
York, in January, 1477 ; that it was intended she 
should become the wife of the King of Denmark 3 ; 

1 Sandford, in his " Genealogical History," who has implicitly fol- 
lowed Speed, states that the daughters of Edward the Fourth were 
born in the following order : 1. Elizabeth, 2. Cecily, 3. Ann, 4. Bridget, 
5. Mary, 6. Margaret, 7. Katherine ; whereas it is certain that they 
followed each other thus: I.Elizabeth, 2. Mary, S.Cecily, 4. Mar- 
garet, 5. Anne, 6. Katherine, 7. Bridget. Richard the Third, in 1484, 
thus mentions them Elizabeth, Cecily, Anne, Katherine, and Bridget. 
Mary and Margaret were then dead. 

8 " Annals of William of Worcester," p. 510. 

3 Rot. Claus., 8 Edw. IV., m. 13. 

(I 



XVIll REMARKS ON THE PRIVY PURSE 

that her father by his will, dated in 1475, bequeathed 
her 10,000 marks to her marriage ; and that she 
died at Greenwich, on Thursday before Whitsun- 
day, i. e., the 23rd of May, 1482 '. On the Monday 
following, her corpse was brought to Greenwich, 
" and there had her dirige began by James Goldwell, 
Lord Bishop of Norwich, who also sung mass the 
next morning, there being present several lords and 
ladies ; and in the afternoon the body was conveyed 
into a mourning chariot, drawn by two horses, also 
trapped with black, and adorned with lozenges of 
her arms. Thus from Greenwich they set forward 
to Kingston, where the corpse rested that night ; 
and from thence, the next morning, towards Wind- 
sor, where being met by the parish in procession, 
at the foot of the bridge next Eaton, they pro- 
ceeded to the chapel at Windsor, where the body 
was buried with the usual offices thereunto be- 
longing 2 ." 

III. CECILY OF YORK. The exact time of the 
birth of this princess is not known, and the first 
notice of her is in July, 1474, when a negociation 
commenced for her marriage with James, the eldest 
son of James King of Scotland 3 , the treaty for 
which was concluded in the October following 4 , 
and part of her dowry was paid. By a subsequent 
treaty, it was arranged that in the event of Edward's 

1 Sandford's " Genealogical History." 

8 Sandford's " Genealogical History," from MS. marked I. 2, in 
the College of Arms. 

8 " Foedera," xi., 814. * Ibid. p. 831. 



OF ELIZABETH OF YORK. XIX 

not wishing the marriage to be consummated, the 
money should be repaid, and, on the 12th of October. 
1482 1 , he claimed the sums advanced; but on the 
1 1th of the preceding June, a negociation was entered 
into with Alexander Duke of Albany, styling himseli 
King of Scotland, in which, among other articles, 
pledging Edward to support his interests, it was 
agreed in the event of Alexander's establishing him- 
self on the throne of Scotland, that if within a year 
" he could make himself clear from other women, 
according to the laws of Christian church, Edward 
would give him his daughter Cecily in marriage ; but 
if he could not do so, then that he would not marry 
his son and heir, if he had one, excepting by the 
ordinance of the King of England to some lady 
of his blood 2 ." Cecily was present with her sisters 
Elizabeth and Mary, at the marriage of their 
brother the young Duke of York, which was per- 
formed with much state on the 15th of January, 

1478 3 . 

The death of Edward the Fourth, and the depo- 
sition of his son, changed the fortunes of his daugh- 
ters. Instead of becoming Queen of Scotland, 
Cecily Plantagenet married John Viscount Welles, 
an especial favourite and uncle of the half-blood 
of Henry the Seventh 4 , through whose influence 

1 " Foedera," xii., 166. 

s Ibid, xii., 1 57. See Hall's " Chronicle," ed. 1809, pp. 330-1. 

Sandford's " Genealogical History," ed. 1707, p. 416. 

* Henry the Seventh and John Viscount Welles were thus related 
by blood and connected by marriage: 

a 2 



XX 



REMARKS ON THE PRIVY PURSE 



he obtained her hand. It has not been discovered 
when their marriage took place, but it must have 
been before December 1487, as at the festival of 
Christmas in that year, when the Heralds " cried" 
the guests at court, they addressed her in these 
words, " Largesse, de noble Princesse la soeur de 
la Reyne notre soveraigne dame, et Countesse de 
Wellys," and Lord Welles is stated to have given 
" for him and my lady his wife" twenty shillings 1 . 
In the 7th Hen. VII., 1491-2, an act of parliament 
was passed which recited that the Viscount promised 
on marrying Lady Cecily to settle certain lands on 
her and the heirs of their bodies, out of the estates 
to which he was restored in the 1st Hen. VII.; but 
as he was then about to accompany the King in his 
voyage royal, it was enacted, to avoid expense, that 
they should hold the lands in question to them and 
the heirs of his body 2 . In the 19th Hen. VII., 1502, 
after the viscount's decease, another settlement 
was made securing those lands to her for her life 3 . 
At the christening of her nephew Prince Arthur, at 
Winchester, on the 24th of September, 1486, Lady 

John Beaufort, Duke = Margaret, daughter of==Leo Lord Welles, 



of Somerset, 
1st husband. 



Sir John Beauchamp, 
of Bletshoe. 



Margaret, Countess of Edward the 
Richmond. Fourth. 



T 



2nd husband. 



King Henry VII. = Elizabeth 
of York. 



Cecily of= John Viscount 

York. Welles. 

1 Leland's " Collectanea," vol. iv., p. 235. 
s Rot. Parl. vi., 450. Ibid. p. 543. 



OF ELIZABETH OF YORK. XXI 

Welles carried him to the font, he being wrapped 
in a mantle of crimson cloth of gold, furred with 
ermine, with a train, which was borne by the Mar- 
chioness of Dorset 1 . When her sister was crowned, 
she was in immediate attendance on her person, and 
supported her train during the whole ceremony 2 . 

Viscount Welles died on the 9th February, 1498-9, 
and had issue two daughters, Elizabeth and Anne, 
who both died young, and their mother married to 
her second husband, a gentleman of the name of 
Kyme, of Lincolnshire. At the marriage of Kathe- 
rine of Arragon to Arthur Prince of Wales, Lady 
Welles bore the princess 1 train 3 . 

It is not a little remarkable that the precise date 
of the birth, of the marriage, of the baptismal name 
of the second husband, and even of the death of the 
Princess Cecily, the sister-in-law of one King and 
the aunt of another, should never have been ascer- 
tained. An entry on the 13th May, 1502, of her 
having lent her sister the Queen 3/. 135. 4c?. on 
some occasion, is the only notice which is to be 
found of her in the Privy Purse Expenses of that 
year. In those of Henry the Seventh, from 1492 
to 1505, her name does not occur; and this account 
of her, imperfect as it is, must be closed with the 
remark, that she is said to have died at Quarera, 
in the Isle of Wight 4 . 

1 Leland's " Collectanea," iv., 205. Ibid. pp. 220, 223, 230. 

8 Hall's " Chronicle," ed. 1809, p. 494. 
4 Sandford's " Genealogical History." 



XX11 REMARKS ON THE PRIVY PURSE 

IV. MARGARET OF YORK, Edward's fourth 
daughter, was bom on the 19th of April, 1472, 
and dying on the 1 1th of December following, was 
buried in Westminster Abbey. This epitaph was 
placed on her tomb : 

Nobilitas et forma, decorq: tenella juventus 
In simul hie ista mortis stint condita cista 
Ut genus et nomen, sexum, tempus quoq: mortis 
Noscas, cuncta tibi manifestat margo sepulchri. 

V. ANNE OF YORK. The Princess Anne must 
have been born subsequent to June, 1475, as she 
is not mentioned in her father's will. On the 18th of 
July, 1479, it was agreed that Philip, the eldest son 
of Maximilian Duke of Austria, should not, for three 
years, form a contract of marriage with any other 
woman than Anne the daughter of the King of 
England 1 ; and on the 5th of August following, the 
treaty for that alliance was concluded 2 . The mar- 
riage, however, did not take place, and nothing more 
is known about her until after her sister Elizabeth 
became Queen of England. At the christening of 
her nephew Prince Arthur, in November, 1486, she 
carried the chrisom, which was pinned on her right 
breast, and hung over her left arm 3 . At the feast 
of the Order of the Garter, in 1488, she was in 
attendance on the Queen 4 , and was present at the 
celebration of the feast of Whitsuntide by the court, 
at Shene, in that year 5 . Her Majesty's second 

1 " Foedera," xii., 110. 8 Ibid. 130. 

3 Leland's " Collectanea," iv., p. 205. 
Ibid. p. 241. 6 Ibid. p. 245. 



OF ELIZABETH OF YORK. Xxiii 

child, Margaret, was baptized at Westminster on 
the 30th November, 1489, when the Princess Anne 
again bore the chrisom, " with a marvellous rich 
cross lace 1 ." 

Early in the year 1495, she became the wife of 
Thomas Lord Howard, eldest son of Thomas Earl 
of Surrey, as on the 14th of February in that year 
Henry the Seventh paid 6s. Sd. for his offering at 
her marriage 2 . On the Rolls of Parliament of the 
llth Hen. VII., October 1495, the agreement " be- 
tween the Queen, with the assent of the King and 
Thomas Earl of Surrey, for a marriage to be had 
and solemnized between Thomas Lord Howard, son 
and heir apparent of the said earl, and Anne sister 
to the said Queen, which marriage is now had and 
solemnized," is recited, and validity was given to 
some of its provisions by the authority of Parlia- 
ment 3 . The Princess Anne is frequently mentioned 
in the Queen's Privy Purse Expenses for 1502; 
whence it appears that she was mainly, if not en- 
tirely, supported at her Majesty's expense. Her 
husband, Lord Howard, was allowed 120/. per an- 
num for "her diet 4 :" materials for her clothes were, 
on one occasion, purchased 5 , and besides ten marks 
a year 6 , her sister gave her 61. 13s. 4d. annually 
for her own purse 7 . 

1 Leland's " Collectanea," iv., p. 253. 

* Privy Purse Expenses of Henry VII., printed in the " Excerpta 
Historica," p. 101. 

Rot. Parl., vi., 480-1, 511. 

* p. 99. 5 p. 9. 6 p. 79. ' p. 94. 



XXIV REMARKS ON THE PRIVY PURSE 

Two sons were the result of her marriage, one 
of whom died immediately after his birth, and the 
other, named Thomas, dying on the 3rd of August, 
1508, was buried at Lambeth. The date of Anne 
Lady Howard's decease is unknown, but it must 
have been before 1515, as her husband married, 
secondly, Elizabeth, daughter of the Duke of Buck- 
ingham, and had by her the renowned Earl of Sur- 
rey, whose eldest son was born in 1536. 

VI. KATHERINE OF YORK. Though the Prin- 
cess Katherine was born 'before August, 1479, it 
could not have been long previous to that time, 
because there is an entry in the Wardrobe Accounts 
between April and September, 1480, of nails being 
purchased to cover the font at her christening at 
Eltham 1 ; and in November in that year, Joan, the 
wife of Robert Colson, her nurse, obtained a grant 
from the King of five pounds per annum 2 . While 
in her infancy, her marriage was determined upon 
with John the son and heir-apparent of Ferdinand 
King of Castile and Leon, the contract for which 
was signed on the 28th August, 1479 3 ; and on the 
2nd March, 1482, ambassadors were appointed to 
complete the treaty 4 . This alliance did not, how- 
ever, take place ; and in November, 1487, it was 
agreed that she should become the wife of James, 
second son of the King of Scotland, by which 
treaty it was also determined, that one of her 

1 See p. 122. s Rot. Glaus., 20 Edw. IV., m. 15. 

3 " Foedera," xii., 110. * Ibid. p. 148. 



OF ELIZABETH OF YORK. XXV 

sisters should marry the elder brother of her in- 
tended husband, whilst his father espoused her 
mother 1 . The death of the Scottish monarch, in 
1488, defeated these plans, and before October, 1495, 
when she was not more than seventeen, she married^ 
the Lord William Courtenay, eldest son of Edward 
Earl of Devon 2 , this being the second time that the 
heir of that illustrious house married a sister of 
the heiress to the throne of England. The settle- 
ment made by the Earl of Devon, of his estates on 
his son and daughter-in-law, and the heirs male of 
the body of his son, was confirmed by parliament 3 . 
Their issue were two sons, Henry, and, as appears 
from the Privy Purse Expenses of the Queen, Ed- 
ward, and a daughter Margaret. 

Katherine Lady Courtenay was present at the 
marriage of Prince Arthur, in November, 150 1 4 , and 
at the betrothment of her niece the Princess Mar- 
garet to the King of Scotland, at Richmond, on the 
10th of January, 1502 5 . 

Not only was Katherine partly maintained by 
her sister the Queen, but her Majesty also paid 
the expenses of her children, the notices of whom 
are of some interest. Her pension from the Queen's 
Privy Purse was 50/. per annum 6 : satin was on one 
occasion purchased for the covering of her saddle 7 ; 
and from entries of money being paid her for the 
Queen's purse, in July, 1502, at Woodstock, and in 

i " Fcedera," xii., p. 329. * Rot. Parl., vi., 481. 3 Ibi I. 

4 Leland's " Collectanea," v., p. 363. 5 Ibid., iv., p. 259. 

8 See p. 99. 7 See p. 1 7. 

e 



XXVI REMARKS ON THE PRIVY PURSE 

January, 1503, at Richmond, it may be inferred 
that she was frequently her companion. Her bro- 
ther-in-law, Henry the Seventh, sent her a present 
of 10/., in September the same year. 

The children of Lord William and Lady Katherine 
Courtenay were placed under the care of Margaret 
Lady Cotton, and resided chiefly at a place belong- 
ing to Sir John Hosy, near Havering-at-Bower, in 
Essex, until the beginning of December, 1 502, when 
they were removed to London 1 . They were attended 
by two female servants and a groom, and for the 
expenses of the whole establishment Lady Cotton 
was allowed no more than 13s. 4d. a week, a striking 
proof of the immense difference between the value 
of money at the commencement of the sixteenth 
and in the nineteenth century. All their clothes 
and other necessaries were paid for by the Queen, 
and several entries occur of the purchase of coats, 
gowns, petticoats, hoses, shoes, medicines, bonnets, 
&c., for their use 2 . 

Lord Edward Courtenay, her second son, died on 
the 12th or 13th of July, 1502 3 , and a servant was 
despatched to the Queen, to know her pleasure as 
to where he should be buried 4 ; at which time his 
mother appears to have been with her Majesty, on 
her journey to Woodstock. The expense of his 
funeral, which amounted to 41. 18s. 4c?., was also de- 
frayed by the Queen, and a present of II. 6s. Sd. 
was made to his nurse and rocker on the occasion 5 . 

1 See pp. 77,79. 2 Seethe INDEX, p. 189. 

8 See pp. 32, 63. 4 See p. 32. * See p. 103. 



OF ELIZABETH OF YORK. XXvil 

Lord William Courtenay having been attainted 
in 1504, he did not succeed to the Earldom of 
Devon on his father's decease in 1509; but on the 
10th May, 1511, Henry the Eighth created him 
Earl of Devon, with remainder to the heirs male of 
his body. The earl did not survive his creation 
many weeks, as he died at Greenwich on the 9th of 
June following, and was interred with the honours 
due to his rank, in St. Paul's cathedral, on the 12th 
of that month. 

The Countess of Devon, his widow, though not 
more than three-and-thirty at his decease, never 
married again, having on the 13th of July, 1511, 
just a month after her loss, made a vow of chastity 
before the Bishop of London, of which the follow- 
ing is a copy : 

" In the name of the Father, the Son, and the 
Holy Ghost, I, Katherine Courtney e, Countess of 
Devonshire, widow, and not wedded, ne unto any 
man assured, promise and make a vow to God, and 
to our Lady, and to all the Company of Heaven, in 
the presence of you, worshipful Father in God, 
Richard Bishop of London, for to be chaste of my 
body, and truly and devoutly shall keep me chaste, 
for this time forward, as long as my life lasteth, 
after the rule of St. Paul. In nomine Patris et Filii 
et Spiritus Sancti 1 ." 

She survived the earl sixteen years, dying at her 

1 Lansdowne MS., 978, f. 144. From the Register of Fitz-James 
Bishop of London, f. xxx. 

e 2 



XXV1I1 REMARKS ON THE PRIVY PURSE 

manor of Tiverton, at three in the afternoon of 
the 15th of November, 1527. Hall says that the 
Countess was a " long time tossed in either fortune, 
sometime in wealth, after in adversity, till the be- 
nignity of her nephew, King Henry the Eighth, 
brought her into a sure estate, according to her 
degree and progeny 1 ." 

A minute account of her funeral is preserved in 
the College of Arms, and is partly printed by 
Sandford, whence it appears that she was interred 
with great pomp, on the 2nd of December, 1527, in 
Tiverton church, where her son, the Marquess of 
Exeter, erected a chapel and tomb, near the high 
altar, to her memory, but which no longer exist. 
The countess's seal, which is engraved in Sandford 's 
" Genealogical History," is deserving of notice for 
its legend. Within an escutcheon, having on the 
dexter side a dolphin, on the sinister a lion rampant 
gardant, and surmounted by a demi rose en soleil, 
the badge of the House of York, are her arms im- 
paled with her husband's : per pale, Baron, Or, three 
torteaux Gules for Courtenay, quartering Or a lion 
rampant Azure for Rivers; Femme, quarterly, 1st 
France and England ; 2nd and 3rd, Burgh, and 
the 4th, Mortimer, surrounded by this inscription, 
KATHERINA COMITISSA DEVON: FILIA: SOROR: 
ET AMIT: REGUM. In the indenture to which that 
seal is attached, dated 24th October, 6 Hen. VIII., 

1 Hall's " Chronicle," ed. 1809, p. 345. 



OF ELIZABETH OF YORK. XXIX 

1514, she uses the same style, " We, Katherine 
Countess of Devonshire, Daughter, Sister, and Aunt 
of Kings." 

Her daughter Margaret died young, being choked 
with a fish bone. Henry Earl of Devonshire, her 
only surviving son, was raised to the Marquisate of 
Exeter, on the 18th June, 1525, and in consequence 
of his royal descent through his mother, received 
an augmentation to his arms, by placing in the 
first quarter the royal arms within a bordure quar- 
terly of the same. He was attainted and beheaded 
in 1538, and left, by Gertrude, daughter of William 
Lord Mountjoy, an only child, 

Sir Edward Courtenay, who was restored in blood 
on the accession of Queen Mary, having on the 3rd 
of September, 1553, been created Earl of Devon, to 
hold to him and his heirs male for ever, a limitation 
which was, it is presumed, intended to restore the 
Earldom of Devon to the male descendants of Hugh 
Courtenay, who was allowed that dignity by Ed- 
ward the Third in 1335. The Earl of Devon died 
at Padua, on the 4th of October, 1556, unmarried, 
when all the issue of the children of Edward the 
Fourth, excepting of his eldest daughter Elizabeth, 
became extinct, and the male representation of the 
house of Courtenay devolved on the Powderham 
branch. 

VII. BRIDGET OF YORK, the seventh daughter 
and youngest child of Edward the Fourth, was born 
at Eltham, in Kent, on the 10th of November, 1480, 
and the next day was baptized by the Bishop of 



XXX REMARKS ON THE PRIVY PURSE, ETC. 

Chichester. In the Wardrobe Accounts of the reign 
of Richard the Third, between the 9th of April, 
1483, and the 2nd of February, 1484, the following 
entry occurs relating to her : " To the Lady Brygitt, 
one of the daughters of K. Edward IHIth., being 
sick in the said Wardrobe for to have for her use 
at that time two long pillows of fustian, stuffed with 
down, and two pillow beres of Holland cloth unto 
them 1 ," whence Walpole concludes that this child 
was not then in sanctuary with the Queen 2 ; but 
these articles may have been delivered before her 
Majesty sought shelter there. From her earliest 
years, she seems to have been devoted by her 
mother to a nunnery, and when very young she 
took the veil at Dartford. On the 6th July, 1502, 
3/. 6s. Sd. were paid by her sister the Queen to the 
Abbess of Dartford, towards the charges of Lady 
Bridget there 3 ; and in September following, a per- 
son was paid for going from Windsor to Dartford 
to Lady Bridget, with a message from her Ma- 
jesty 4 . The Queen contributed to her support out 
of her Privy Purse, the amount allowed her being 
13/. 6s. Sd. per annum 5 . 

The Princess Bridget continued at Dartford, 
spending her days in the seclusion and tranquillity 
of a convent until her death, which occurred about 
the year 1517, when she was thirty-seven years 
of age. 

1 Printedin the " Antiquarian Repertory," ed. 1 807,vol. i., p. 51. 

8 " Historic Doubts," p. 67. 3 See page 29. 

4 See p. 50. * See p. 99. 



XXXI 



MEMOIR OF ELIZABETH OF YORK, 

ELDEST DAUGHTER OF KING EDWARD THE FOURTH, 
AND CONSORT OF KING HENRY THE SEVENTH. 



" Inerat illi ab unguiculis Dei timor et servitum admirabile; in 
parentes vero mira observaiitia; erga fratres et sorores amor ferme 
incredibilis ; in pauperes Christique ministros, reverenda ac singularis 
affectio." BERNARD ANDREAS, Poet Laureate to Henry VII. 



OF ELIZABETH OF YORK, the daughter, sister, niece, 
wife, mother, and progenitrix of Kings of England, 
the legitimate heiress to the throne, and the happy 
instrument of terminating the wars which deluged 
this country with blood, and who, to such historical 
pretensions to be commemorated, united those claims 
which beauty, virtue, and goodness confer, no Me- 
moir, deserving of the name, has been hitherto 
written. 

This illustrious woman was the eldest child of 
King Edward the Fourth by his Queen Elizabeth 
Wydeville, and was born at Westminster on the 
llth of February, 1464-5 *. Her baptism was cele- 

1 Sandford says she was born on the llth of February, 1466, but as 



XXX11 MEMOIR OF 

brated with great solemnity in Westminster Abbey, 
her grandmother, the Duchess of York, the Duchess 
of Bedford, and Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick, 
being her sponsors. In the 7th Edw. IV., 1467, the 
manor of Great Lynford, in Buckinghamshire, was 
granted to her for life 2 , and on the 9th of October, in 
the ensuing year, the Treasurer and Chamberlains of 
the Exchequer were commanded to pay the Queen 
400/. annually, in consideration of the expenses which 
she incurred about the Princesses Elizabeth and 
Mary, which sum was to be paid until they were 
otherwise provided for 3 . On the 6th of November, 
1469, the King, with the advice of the Lords of his 
Council, determined that his daughter Elizabeth, 
who was then in her fifth year, should marry George 
Neville, the eldest son of John Earl of Northumber- 
land 4 , afterwards Marquess of Montagu, and on the 
5th of January following, that young nobleman was 
consequently created Duke of Bedford 5 ; but this 
intention was soon afterwards abandoned on account 
of the defection of the Marquess, and in 1477, the 
Duke of Bedford was degraded from all his ho- 
nours 6 . 

In June, 1475, Edward the Fourth invaded France 

thirty seven persons were relieved at her Maunday in 1507, and as 
she is said on her monument to have completed her thirty-eighth 
year at her decease, the date in the text must be correct. 
z Rot. Patent., 7 Edw. IV., p. 2, m. 10. 

3 Rot. Claus., 8 Edw. IV., m. 13. 

4 Rot. Cart., 9 Edw. IV., n. 3. 5 Ibid. 
c Rot. Parl., 17 Edw. IV., n. 16. 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. XXX111 

% 

with a large army, and previous to embarking he 
made his will 1 , which is dated at Sandwich on the 
20th of that month, wherein he noticed his sons, 
the Prince of Wales and the Duke of York, and 
thus alluded to his daughters. 

" Item we wil that owe doughtre Elizabeth have xM 
marc towards her mariage and that owre doughtre Marie 
have also to her mariage xM marc soo that thay may be 
gouverned and rieuled in thair manages by owre derrest wiff 
the Quene and by owre said son the Prince if God fortune 
him to comme to age of discrecion. And if he decease 
afore such age as God defende then by such as God dis- 
poseth to bee owre heire and by such Lords and other as 
then shal bee of thair Counsaill and if either of owre said 
doughters doo marie thaims self without such advys and 
assent soo as they bee therby disparaged as God forbede 
that then shee soo marieng her self have noo paiement of 
her said xM marc but that it be emploied by owre execu- 
tours towards the hasty paiement of owr debtes &c." 

" Item where we trust in God owre said win 7 bee now 
with childe if God fortune it to bee a doughtre then we 
wil that shee have also xM marc towards her mariage." 

" Item to the mariage of our doughtre Cecille for whom 
we have appointed and concluded with the King of Scotts 
to be maried to his son and heere," &c. 

The expedition into France speedily terminated 



1 The will of Edward (he Fourth escaped the editor of " Royal 
Wills." The testament referred to in the text was copied from the 
Rolls Chapel, and forms part of the inedited collections for Rymer's 
" Foedera," in the additional MS. 4615, in the British Museum. 

f 



XXXIV MEMOIR OF 

in a peace, one condition of which was that the 
Dauphin should marry the Princess Elizabeth, but 
if she died before she became of a proper age, then 
that he should marry her sister Mary, the agree- 
ment for which alliance was signed in August, 
1475 1 . Three years afterwards, on the 26th of 
August, 1478, her dowry was settled, and it was de- 
termined that the expenses of her journey to France 
on her marriage should be defrayed by the French 
monarch 2 . On the 12th of May, 1480, when she was 
in her sixteenth year, Lord Howard and Dr. Langton 
were appointed ambassadors, to settle the ceremony 
of her journey to France, and some other points, 
as well as to obtain a continuation of the truce then 
subsisting with that country, during the lives of 
the two monarchs 8 ; but Lord Howard discovered 
that Louis had no intention of fulfilling his en- 
gagement, and Edward did not live to punish his 
treachery in the way he contemplated. It is hinted 
by Bernard Andreas 4 , that subsequent to this dis- 
appointment, her father offered Elizabeth's hand to 
the young Earl of Richmond, afterwards Henry the 
Seventh, but that the Earl suspected it was merely 
a bait to induce him to place himself in the King's 
power. 

On the death of Edward the Fourth, which took 

" Foedera," xii., p. 20. * Ibid., p. 90. 

8 Ibid., xii., p. 113. 
4 Cottonian MS., Domitian, A. xviii. 



ELIZABETH OP YORK. XXXV 

place on the 9th of April, 1483, at Westminster, the 
crown devolved upon his eldest son, Edward Prince 
of Wales, who was then at Ludlow; but the suspi- 
cious conduct of his uncle, the Duke of Gloucester, 
in gaining possession of his person, and his treatment 
of the Queen's relations during the young monarch's 
journey to London, alarmed his mother to such a 
degree that she immediately threw herself into sanc- 
tuary at Westminster, being accompanied by her 
second son, the Duke of York, by her five daughters, 
Elizabeth, Cecily, Anne, Katherine, and Bridget, 
and by her brother, Lionel Wydeville, Bishop of 
Salisbury 1 . At that time, the Princess Elizabeth 
was little more than eighteen, and her youngest 
sister Bridget not quite three years old. Edward 
the Fifth arrived in the metropolis on the 4th of 
May, about which day his mother took refuge from 
the machinations of her brother-in-law. On the 
16th of June, Richard, who on the 27th of May 
was declared Protector of the Realm, succeeded, 
through the eloquence of Cardinal Bourchier, in 
inducing the Queen to resign the Duke of York into 
his hands. That the Duke perished in the Tower 
with his brother, Edward the Fifth, though doubted 
by some writers, seems nevertheless to be as conclu- 
sively proved as, in the absence of positive evidence, 
any fact can be established ; and for a few months, 

1 See a letter printed in the " Excerpta Historioa," p. 16. 

f 2 



XXXvi MEMOIR OF 

during which Edward the Fourth's widow and 

o 

daughters continued in sanctuary, the Usurper en- 
joyed the throne, undisturbed by conspirators or 
rivals. 

Early in October, however, whilst at Lincoln, 
Richard was astonished to learn that his friend and 
supporter, the Duke of Buckingham, whom he styled 
with some justice, " the most untrue creature living," 
had renounced his allegiance, and was taking mea- 
sures to dethrone him. The Duke's motives, though 
variously stated, appear to have been, in the first 
instance, the hope of attaining the crown, his claim 
being founded upon his descent from Thomas Duke 
of Gloucester, the youngest son of Edward the 
Third l ; for, however absurd in the eyes of others 
may be the pretence, there is nothing too vague for 
ambition to lay hold on, when accompanied by 
what is deemed sufficient power and influence to 



1 Sharon Turner, after noticing this descent, says, on the authority 
of an apocryphal speech imputed to Buckingham by Grafton, " Yet 
the lineal right on which his heated fancy preferred to rest, was, 
that his mother was the heiress of the house of Somerset, which, 
by Gaunt's third wife, asserted itself to be next in succession to the 
crown." vol. hi., p. 507. This could not possibly have been the case, 
because the duke's mother was only the daughter and coheiress 
of Edmund Duke of Somerset, second son of John Marquess of 
Dorset (the eldest son of John of Gaunt by Katherine Swynford) ; 
and John Duke of Somerset, the first son, left issue Margaret Countess 
of Richmond, mother of Henry the Seventh. The idea that he forgot 
the superior pretensions of the Countess until she reminded him of 
them in a conversation near Worcester, is too weak to need refutation. 
Grafton's Chronicle, p. 117. Hall's Chronicle, p. 388. 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. XXXV11 

enforce its desires. But rinding that his party 
would not support so preposterous an object, the 
Duke espoused the cause of the Earl of Richmond, 
who it was resolved should marry Elizabeth, the 
eldest daughter of Edward the Fourth, and the law- 
ful heiress to the throne. If such a transition, 
as from being himself the claimant he became the 
aider of another pretender to the crown, actually 
occurred, Buckingham's real motives were undoubt- 
edly a desire to revenge some affront or injustice 
which he received from Richard, and his overthrow 
does not merit the slightest sympathy. 

The proposed union being communicated to the 
Countess of Richmond, by Sir Reginald Bray, 
she heartily approved of the design, and sent her 
physician, Dr. Lewis, to Westminster, to discuss the 
subject with the late Queen. Her assent was easily 
obtained ; and she promised that if Henry would 
solemnly engage to marry her daughter, she and 
her friends would support the attempt in his fa- 
vour. At that moment the Earl of Richmond and 
his uncle, Jasper Tudor Earl of Pembroke, were 
in Brittany, whither they fled after the battle of 
Tewksbury, and Christopher Ursewick, chaplain to 
the Countess of Richmond, together with Mr. Con- 
way, were sent to that province with intelligence of 
the plot. The rebellion began to assume a formid- 
able character, but Richard was neither ignorant of, 
nor indifferent to the proceedings, and made vigor- 



xxxviii \IEMOIR of 

ous preparations to suppress them. On the 12th 
of October, he wrote to the Chancellor from Lin- 
coln, informing him of Buckingham's treachery ; and 
desiring that the great seal might be sent him, in 
case he was too infirm to come himself, adding, in 
his own hand, that he hoped it would not be long 
before he was in the neighbourhood of the Duke to 
subdue his malice 1 . On the 24th of September, 
Buckingham sent to Richmond, appointing the 18th 
of October for the general rising, and urging him 
to land on that day at Plymouth 2 . So much of the 
plan as depended on the confederates in England 
was promptly executed, but it was met by equal 
promptitude on the part of the King. A heavy fall 
of rain, by swelling the Severn, prevented Buck- 
ingham from crossing that river and joining his 
other forces ; and his followers, being perhaps intimi- 
dated by Richard's proclamation, which was issued 
from Leicester on the 23d of October, became dis- 
heartened, and deserted. The Duke sought safety 
in flight, but, being betrayed by one of his servants, 
he was apprehended, conveyed to Salisbury, and 
beheaded on the 2nd of November, 1483. Rich- 
mond sailed from Brittany on the 12th of October 
with 5000 Breton soldiers, and arrived off the coast, 
but doubting whether the troops which were ready 
to receive him were friends or enemies, he did not 

1 Ellis's " Original Letters." * Rot. Parl., \i, p. 245. 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. 



land. Richard having marched into the western 
counties, his appearance struck terror into the Earl's 
supporters ; and their leaders fled to Brittany, whi- 
ther Richmond retired, on hearing of the execution 
of Buckingham. On Christmas-day following, the 
Earl of Richmond, accompanied by the Marquess 
of Dorset, went to the cathedral of Vannes, where 
they solemnly pledged themselves to each other, 
and Richmond swore to marry Elizabeth of York 
immediately after he ascended the throne. 

Richard returned to London before the 1st of De- 
cember, and in the Parliament which met at West- 
minster on the 23rd of January, 1484, his right to 
the crown was admitted, the marriage of Edward the 
Fourth was pronounced void, and his children were 
bastardized. The Earl of Richmond, the Earl of 
Pembroke, the Duke of Buckingham, the Queen's 
son, the Marquess of Dorset, and her brothers, Sir 
Richard Wydeville, and Lionel Bishop of Salis- 
bury, with Morton Bishop of Ely, the Bishop of 
Exeter, and several other persons were attainted of 
high treason. The Countess of Richmond was de- 
clared to have merited a similar punishment, for 
" sending writings, tokens, and messages to the Earl 
her son, stirring him to invade the realm;" but in 
consideration of the services which her husband, 
Lord Stanley, had rendered the King, he forbore 
to attaint the Countess, but the act declared her 
lands to be forfeited, degraded her from all titles of 



MEMOIR OF 



dignity, and settled her property on her husband 
for life, with remainder to the crown 1 . 

It would appear that Queen Elizabeth and her 
children remained for several months in sanctuary; 
and the sudden disappearance, if not murder, of 
her sons, as well as the attainder and flight of 
her brothers and friends, were calculated to in- 
crease the fears which made her seek its protec- 
tion. On the 1st of March, 1484, ten months after 
they entered it, Richard solemnly bound himself 
by a written engagement, on the word of a King, 
that if the daughters of the Queen, whom he styles 
" late calling herself Queen of England," would 
quit their place of refuge, and submit to his direc- 
tion, their lives and honour should be secured to 
them ; that they should not be imprisoned, but be 
supported in a manner suitable to his kinswomen, 
and that he would marry them to gentlemen of birth, 
giving to each an estate in lands of the yearly value 
of two hundred marks ; and that he would strictly 
charge their husbands to treat them as his relations, 
upon pain of his displeasure. He moreover promised 
to allow their mother 700 marks, 266. 13s. 4d 
a year, and to discountenance any reports circu- 
lated to their prejudice. The document itself is 
of so much interest that it is proper a literal copy 
of it should be inserted : 

1 Rot. Parl., vi., p. 244 et seq., and p. 250-1. 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. xli 



"M d . that I Richard by the Grace of God King of 
England and of Fraunce, and Lord of Irland, in the presens 
of you my Lords spirituell and temporell, and you Mair and 
Aldermen of my Cite of London, promitte and swere verbo 
regio upon these holy Evangelies of God by me personelly 
touched, that if the doughters of dame Elizabeth Gray late 
calling her selfFQuene of England, that is to wit Elizabeth, 
Cecill, Anne, Kateryn, and Briggitte, woli come unto me 
out of the Sanctwarie of Westminster and be guyded, ruled, 
and demeaned after me, than I shall see that they shalbe in 
suertie of their lyffs, and also not suffre any manner hurt by 
any maner persone or persones to them or any of theim or 
their bodies and persones, to be done by way of ravissement 
or defouling contrarie their willes, nor them or any of theim 
emprisone within the Toure of London or other prisonne ; 
but that I shall put theim in honest places of good name and 
fame, and theim honestly and curtesly shall see to be 
founden and entreated, and to have all things requisite and 
necessary for their exibicion and findings as my kynnes- 
women ; and that I shall do marie suche of them as now 
ben mariable to Gentilmen born, and everiche of them geve 
in mariage lands and tenements to the yerely vale we of cc. 
marcs for term of their lyves ; and in likewise to the other 
doughters when they come to lawfull age of mariage if they 
lyff. And suche gentilmen as shall happ to marie with them 
I shall straitly charge, from tyme to tyme, lovyngly to love 
and entreate them as their wiffs and my kynneswomen, as 
they woll advoid and eschue my displeasur. 

" And over this that I shall yerely fromhensfurth content 
and pay, or cause to be contented and paied, for th'exhibi- 
cion and finding of the said dame Elizabeth Gray during her 
naturall liff at iiij. termes of the yere, that is to wit at 

g 



xlii MEMOIR OF 

pasche, midsomer, michilmasse, and christenmesse, to John 
Nesfelde, one of the squiers for my body, for his finding, to 
attende upon her, the summe of DCC. marcs of lawfull money 
of England, by even porcions ; and moreover I promitte to 
them, that if any surmyse or evyll report be made to me of 
them, or any of them, by any persoue or persones, that than 
I shall not geve therunto faith ne credence, nor therfore put 
them to any maner ponysshement, before that they or any 
of them so accused may be at their lawfull defence and 
answer. In witnesse whereof to this writing of my Othe 
and Promise aforsaid, in your said presences made, I have 
set my sign manuell the first day of Marche the first yere of 
my Reigne 1 ." 

If this document be genuine, and that it is so 
cannot reasonably be doubted, ample evidence is 
afforded of the interest which the country felt about 
the children of Edward the Fourth ; and it may be 
inferred that they quitted the sanctuary in March, 
1484. Mr. Sharon Turner's remark, that "there 
was indeed an unworthy jealousy of power in not 
calling them Princesses in his oath, and in the idea 
of marrying them as private gentlewomen merely 2 ," 
is not well founded, because the marriage of their 
mother had just before been declared invalid, and 
they were bastardized by the Act of Settlement; 
hence, if Richard had styled them " Princesses," 
or treated them in any other way than as private 
gentlewomen, he would have contradicted the act 

1 Ellis's " Original Letters." Second Series. Vol. L, p. 149. 
8 "History of England," ed. 1825, vol. iv. p. 14. 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. xliii 

of Parliament, and have impeached his own title 
to the crown. 

The death of the Prince of Wales, the eldest son 
of Richard the Third, on the 9th of the following 
April, plunged the Usurper into profound grief; 
and if he were accessary to the murder of his ne- 
phews about the same time in the preceding year, 
the blow must have fallen with additional force 
from the suggestions of his conscience that it might 
have been directed as an act of retributive justice. 
No change was produced by this circumstance in 
the situation of the children of the late monarch ; 
but as it became necessary to name a successor 
to the crown, Richard selected his nephew the Earl 
of Lincoln, son of his sister Elizabeth Duchess 
of Suffolk. From the time when the instrument 
by which their safety was guaranteed was issued, 
little is known of them ; and though they are pre- 
sumed to have lived in the Court, the only notice 
of the mother or daughters is the remark of the 
Chronicler of Croyland, that at the celebration 
of Christmas by the Court, in 1484, Elizabeth of 
York was "dressed in clothes of the same form and 
colour as those of Queen Anne, Richard's consort, 
from which circumstance many people supposed 
that he intended to free himself from his wife either 
by a divorce or by her death, and to marry his niece 
Elizabeth." This fact could not warrant such an 
hypothesis, and the only rational conclusion to be 

g 2 



xliv MEMOIR OF 

drawn from the coincidence is, that Richard strictly 
fulfilled his engagement that his nieces should be 
supported as became his kinswomen. 

The question, whether Richard intended to marry 
Elizabeth in the event of the death of his wife, is 
important to his character ; and the truth of the as- 
sertion, that before Queen Anne's decease he was 
not only accepted, but eagerly courted, by Elizabeth, 
is no less material to her fame. 

Richard's detractors have insisted, that after he 
discovered the intentions of the friends of Elizabeth, 
and of the Earl of Richmond, to blend their respec- 
tive pretensions to the crown by their marriage, he 
was impressed with the policy of strengthening his 
own title by making her his Queen ; that this be- 
came apparent in the similarity of her costume to the 
dress of her Majesty, as early as Christmas, 1484 ; 
that to promote his wishes he actually poisoned his 
wife ; and that after her death, which took place 
on the llth of March, 1485, his design was aban- 
doned in consequence of the representations of his 
advisers, that a union between an uncle and niece 
was so unnatural, that if it occurred, the disgust of 
his subjects would, in all likelihood, drive him from 
the throne. 

It will tend to simplify the discussion of these 
points, if the horror with which such a marriage 
is said to have been viewed be first examined. 

Following the example of almost every writer 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. xlv 

^ 

who has treated of English history, in the fatal 
error of estimating conduct by the standard of 
morality and customs of the present day instead 
of by that of the period alluded to, the violent 
assailants of Richard have found a source of ob- 
loquy in the very possibility of so incestuous a 
union. The legality or illegality of a marriage of 
relations must depend upon the rules of the church 
to which the parties belong. It was undoubtedly 
forbidden by the canon law; but the same law 
forbade a marriage between persons within the 
fourth degrees of kindred. The Pope was, how- 
ever, considered to possess a dispensing power, and 
though, as a matter of feeling, there is a material 
difference between the union of first or second 
cousins, and the marriage of a niece to her uncle, 
each alliance was illegal without the exercise of 
that power. The Pontiif not only might, but often 
did, authorize the marriage of uncles and nieces ; 
and where would have been the crime, if Richard, 
as a son of the church of Rome, had sought to 
fortify his throne and prevent a civil war by avail- 
ing himself of an indulgence which then, as now, 
is held in all Catholic countries to be strictly legal ? 
It is true that in England relatives so closely con- 
nected seldom married, and, excepting under ur- 
gent circumstances, it might not have been wise 
to deviate so much from the general custom ; but 
all which is contended is, that an act which was 



xlvi 



MEMOIR OF 



not unusual in other countries, which was not for- 
bidden by the common law, and which could be 
rendered lawful in the eyes of the church, might 
have been contemplated by Richard the Third with- 
out rendering him the incestuous monster he has 
been represented. 

It is next desirable to inquire whether Richard 
actually did wish to marry the Princess Elizabeth. 
With the exception of a letter cited by Buck, from 
her to the Duke of Norfolk, there is no evidence 
that he ever entertained such an intention. The 
Chronicler of Croyland, Buck, More, Grafton, and 
those who have followed them, certainly assert that 
such were his views. Their statements, however, 
not only require to be supported by proofs, but 
are open to violent suspicion, on the ground that 
it could not have been Richard's policy to form 
an alliance with either of Edward the Fourth's 
daughters. 

In the absence of conclusive evidence upon a 
point of history, the obvious interests of the indi- 
vidual concerned must be allowed great weight ; 
and if a statement which stands on very dubious 
authority cannot be believed without assigning to 
him to whom it relates conduct directly at variance 
with that which the public records shew he pur- 
sued ; and if credence, in that statement can only 
be given by imputing to the person an inconsist- 
ency so great, and a change of opinion so flagrant, 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. xlvii 



that his political existence must have been endan- 
gered, there is just cause for rejecting every thing 
short of positive proof '. 

The murder of the young princes by Richard's 
commands may be believed, because it was impera- 
tively his interest to remove them, and because there 
is little doubt that they actually did disappear and 
were never afterwards heard of. That it was not 
his interest to marry the Princess Elizabeth, and, 
consequently, that the strongest testimony is neces- 
sary to prove that he intended to do so, is apparent 
from the following circumstances. 

It was the act of the first parliament which he 
summoned, to bastardize the children of his brother, 
because their legitimacy would have been an insur- 
mountable bar to his right to the throne by " inhe- 
ritance," which was the title he pretended to pos- 
sess l . In the only document which has been dis- 
covered relative to them, dated in March, 1484, 
they are treated as illegitimate ; and on the death 
of the Prince of Wales in April, the Earl of Lincoln 
was declared heir to the Crown. It is certain that 
they were still considered in the same light so late 
as August in that year, when, with the view of 
strengthening the alliance with Scotland, Richard 

Act of Settlement. Rot. Parl. vi., 241. The children of his elder 
brother, the Duke of Clarence, were declared incapable of inheriting 
by reason of their father's attainder, and the crown was settled on 
Richard and the heirs of his body. 



xlviii MEMOIR OF 

promised his niece Anne, the daughter of the 
Duchess of Suffolk, to the Prince of Scotland, she 
being his nearest female relation whose blood was 
not bastardized or attainted. These acts occurred 
many months after he became aware of the design 
of marrying the Earl of Richmond to Elizabeth of 
York ; and there seems no greater reason why he 
should have thought it politic to marry Elizabeth 
after August, 1484, than previous to that time. 
Independent of his relationship to her, there were 
other obstacles to their union. His title to the crown 
would not have been strengthened by marrying a 
woman whom the law had declared a bastard ; and 
to have repealed that declaration would be to call 
into existence her right to the crown and to proclaim 
himself an usurper. A measure so inconsistent with 
his safety, so contradictory to the whole tenor of his 
policy, seems incredible ; and can it for a moment 
be believed that he endeavoured to effect it by 
the murder of a wife who was fast hastening to 
the tomb with disease, and by a marriage which 
even the authority of the Pope could not, it is 
said, reconcile to the feelings and manners of his 
subjects ? 

There is no difficulty in supposing that Richard 
would commit any crime which his interests might 
dictate; but it is not so easy to imagine that he 
would imbrue his hands in the blood of his wife to 
gain an object, which, so far from promoting his 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. xlix 

interests, must have materially injured them. The 
worst enemies of the Usurper have contented them- 
selves with representing him as an atrocious villain, 
but not one of them has described him as a fool. 
According to the authorities by whom this scheme 
is attributed to Richard, he entertained the design 
of raising Elizabeth to the throne about Christmas, 
1484, at which time his Queen was taken ill, and 
when, by the advice of her physicians, he abstained 
from her bed. It was soon discovered that she was 
not likely to survive beyond the ensuing February, 
and she actually died about the llth of March. 
Upon the coincidence between the supposed wish 
of Richard to marry Elizabeth in December, 1484, 
and Anne's decease in March, 1485, has her hus- 
band been accused of murdering her, a charge 
which is deserving of attention for no other reason 
than as it affords a remarkable example of the man- 
ner in which ignorance and prejudice sometimes 
render what is called history more contemptible 
than a romance. 

It appears, therefore, that, if Richard ever se- 
riously contemplated marrying Elizabeth, he was 
guilty of no greater crimes than extreme folly, and 
the indelicacy of thinking of a second wife before 
the death of his first, " a violation of the feelings 
which," as Mr. Sharon Turner gravely remarks, in 
reference to Richard, "society rightly chooses to 
exact and to make sacred," but which has been 

h 



MEMOIR OF 



violated by more sovereigns and more husbands than 
Richard the Third. The evidence of his having 
entertained such an intention will be now examined. 

Though asserted by the Chronicler of Croyland, 
by Grafton, Fabian, Hall, Sir Thomas More, and 
their copyists, there is only one statement on the 
subject which has the character of proof. But 
that statement is by no means sufficiently conclu- 
sive to establish a point of history against proba- 
bility, because it contradicts a material part of the 
story as related by the writers alluded to ; and be- 
cause the article in question was only seen by an 
historian whose violent prejudices do not sufficiently 
account for the mendacity for which his work is 
remarkable. 

Buck, in his Life of Richard the Third, says, 
" When the midst and last of February was past, 
the Lady Elizabeth, being more impatient and jea- 
lous of the success than every one knew or conceived, 
writes a letter to the Duke of Norfolk, intimating 
first, that he was the man in whom she most affied, 
in respect of that love her father had ever bore 
him, &c. Then she congratulates his many cour- 
tesies, in continuance of which, she desires him 
to be a mediator for her to the King, in behalf of the 
marriage propounded between them, who, as she 
wrote, was her only joy and maker in this world, 
and that she was his in heart and thought; with 
all insinuating, that the better part of February 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. 11 

t 

was past, and that she feared the queen would 
never die. 

" All these be her own words, written with her 
own hand, and this is the sum of her letter, which 
remains in the autograph, or original draft, under 
her own hand, in the magnificent cabinet of Thomas 
Earl of Arundel and Surrey 1 ." 

If this letter really existed 2 , and if Buck has cited 
it fairly, it would be in vain to contend against such 
testimony, and Elizabeth's fame would be irredeem- 
ably affected, not on the ground of her relationship 
to Richard, but from his being the author of the 
misfortunes and disgrace of her family, if not the 
murderer of her brothers ; and because she had 
pledged herself but a few months before to marry 
the Earl of Richmond. The character of Buck as 
a faithless writer is well known ; and even if his 
notorious inaccuracies and prejudices do not justify 
the suspicion that the letter itself was never written, 
it is not too much to suggest that the interpretation 
which he has given to it is at variance with truth. 
As Buck has inserted copies of several documents 
of much less interest, it may be asked, why did he 
not give this most important letter at length ? Nor 



i Ed. 1646, p. 128. 

s It is proper to observe, that Dr. Lingard, whose sagacity is not 
exceeded by that of any other historian of England, seems to believe 
that Richard really intended to marry Elizabeth, and does not express 
any doubt of the accuracy of Buck's report of her letter to the Duke 
of Norfolk." History of England," ed. 1823, vol. v., p. 355 and 
p. 359. 

h 2 



Ill MEMOIR OF 

is it less remarkable, that even if he were the first 
person who brought it to light, no other individual 
should have had sufficient curiosity to copy it. 
Buck's work appeared in the days of Dugdale, of 
Anthony Wood, and of several other eminent an- 
tiquaries, who have left imperishable monuments 
of their zeal in collecting historical materials, yet 
not a single transcript, much less the original of 
this extraordinary communication, is known to be 
extant. No other writer than Buck ever saw it, so 
that its existence rests upon his authority alone, 
and every one must form his own judgment as to 
the degree of confidence to which he is entitled 1 . 
The Chroniclers, who impute to Richard the design 
of marrying his niece, agree in stating that she 
resolutely opposed his wishes. Grafton's words 
are, " But because all men, and the maiden herself 
most of all, detested and abhorred this unlawful and 

1 If the letter cited by Buck really existed, its purport may perhaps 
be reconciled with other facts by supposing that he mistook its date, 
or assigned to it a wrong one ; and that, in fact, the person for whom 
she expressed so eager a desire to marry was Henry instead of Richard. 
Many parts of the abstract would agree with this hypothesis, for the 
allusion to February, and Queen Anne, Buck calls an "insinuation," 
and a passage of doubtful import becomes doubly doubtful when 
construed by so suspicious a reporter. The only thing which renders 
this idea unlikely is, that the letter is said to have been addressed to 
the Duke of Norfolk, who perished at Bosworth Field ; but may not 
its address, too, have been an " inference" arising from its being in the 
possession of the duke's descendant ? It would, however, be useless 
to press the point farther, since there is no limit to conjecture ; but 
any probable explanation of so dubious a version of that document 
is entitled to attention. Sharon Turner, in his zeal to exculpate 
Kichard, suggests that, if this letter be genuine, he was the " seduced," 
rather than the " seducer." " History of England," vol. iv., p. 24. 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. 



in manner unnatural copulation, he determined to 
prolong and defer the matter till he were in more 
quietness ;" and this is the only explanation he 
gives, why, when Queen Anne died in March, 
1485, Richard did not execute his design. The 
Croyland Chronicler, however, offers this additional 
reason, that twelve doctors in theology gave it as 
their opinion that the Pope could not legalize it 
by any dispensation. If this be true, it is not very 
evident from what source the Pontiff derives the 
power of authorizing such an alliance at the present 
day, even if instances cannot be adduced of the 
practice at the period in question. 

For the reasons which have been stated, it may 
be presumed that Richard never contemplated a 
marriage with Elizabeth ; that the letter noticed by 
Buck is grossly misquoted, even if any letter to that 
purport was ever written by her; and that the 
whole tale was invented with the view of blacken- 
ing Richard's character, to gratify the monarch in 
whose reign all the contemporary writers who relate 
it flourished, an opinion which is supported by the 
fact, that not one of them even insinuates that 
Elizabeth consented to the alliance, but agree in 
stating her utter repugnance to the project. 

The materials for a history of the reign of Richard 
the Third are so very meagre and imperfect, that 
every thing which is contemporary with it merits 
attention. For this reason it would be improper not 
to notice a kind of metrical narrative of Elizabeth 



liv MEMOIR OF 

of York's connection with the revolution in favour 
of Henry the Seventh, entitled " The Most Pleasant 
Song of Lady Bessy," written by Humphrey Brereton, 
who represents himself to have been an Esquire 
in the retinue of Lord Stanley, afterwards Earl of 
Derby ; to have been privy to the manner in which 
that nobleman was detached from Richard's in- 
terests ; to have carried the letters to Lord Stanley's 
son, brother, and other relatives in Cheshire, urging 
them to espouse Richmond's cause; and to have 
been the bearer of a communication from Elizabeth 
and Stanley to Henry in Brittany. Of this " Song," 
two copies, differing materially from ea'ch other, 
are extant. One of them is a corrupt if not inter- 
polated transcript, in the hand-writing of the reign 
of Charles the Second, in the possession of William 
Bateman, Esq., and has been lately printed with 
a judicious preface and notes by Mr. Hey wood. 
The other transcript, which is in the Harleian MS. 
367, has suffered less from the ignorance of the 
copyist, though it is by no means certain that it 
is in the same state as the author wrote it. That 
much historical information is often contained in 
productions of this nature is well known, for of 
many events there are no other than metrical de- 
scriptions. It is difficult to determine to what 
extent the statements in this " Song" are to be 
received as truth ; but that they are not wholly 
imaginary is unquestionable. That Humphrey 
Brereton was in the service of Lord Stanley ; that 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. Iv 

he was entrusted with letters from his master to the 
parties he mentions in Cheshire ; that he was sent 
to Richmond ; and that the " Song" was written by 
him soon after the accession of Henry the Seventh, 
may perhaps be conceded. Many of the facts 
which he relates are points of history that have 
never been doubted, hence the outlines of his pic- 
ture may be relied on ; but the nice question is, to 
what extent did he draw upon his imagination in 
the grouping, colouring, and filling up ? That he 
has introduced a great deal of fiction in the minor 
details, especially in reference to himself; that in 
imitation of the only historians of his times, the 
Chroniclers, he has put speeches into the mouths 
of persons which never were spoken ; and that he 
has not hesitated to add to the interest of his story, 
by introducing circumstances which could not have 
occurred, such, for example, as the Princess Eliza- 
beth taking him in her arms, and thrice kissing 
him, cannot for a moment be denied. Still these 
blemishes do not divest his composition of claims to 
be considered of some historical authority in relation 
to events in which he was himself concerned ; nor 
does the circumstance of his speaking of Lord 
Stanley as Earl of Derby lessen his credibility, for 
though that nobleman did not possess the latter 
title when the events described took place, it was 
usual for early writers to allude to individuals by 
the designations borne by them at the time they 
wrote. The most probable facts related by Brereton, 



MEMOIR OF 



but which rest on his authority alone, are that Eli- 
zabeth was especially recommended to the care of 
Lord Stanley by Edward the Fourth on his death- 
bed ; that she lodged in his house in London after 
she quitted the sanctuary ; that she was privy to 
the rising in favour of Richmond ; that she could 
write and read both French and Spanish ; that 
Brereton was sent into Cheshire to Stanley's son, 
Lord Strange, to his brother, and to other relations, 
entreating them to support Richmond's cause ; and 
that he was the bearer of letters to Henry in 
Brittany, together with a letter and a ring from 
Elizabeth to him. On his return, he says, that he 
found her in London ; that she shortly afterwards 
accompanied Stanley to Leicester ; and that she was 
in the neighbourhood of Bosworth when that battle 
was fought. Whether, as Brereton relates, Lord 
Stanley was induced to abandon Richard in con- 
sequence of Elizabeth's pathetic remonstrances, and 
of the picture which she held up to his view of the 
Usurper's character, charging him with the murder 
of Henry the Sixth, and of the two young princes, 
with poisoning his Queen that he might make her 
" his leman," and all the other crimes with which 
his enemies have loaded his memory, cannot be 
determined, but perhaps this part of his tale is that 
which is least worthy of credit. In these particulars, 
however, the statements of Grafton are closely fol- 
lowed ; and if the slightest reliance can be placed 
on Brereton's authority, it must be concluded that 



ELIZABETH Of YORK. IvH 

Henry was indebted to Elizabeth alone for the sup- 
port of the Stanleys, and consequently for his crown, 
that Richard sought to obtain, if not her hand, at 
least her person, that her fidelity to her engage- 
ment with Henry remained unshaken, and that she 
treated the Usurper's advances with scorn and ab- 
horrence. 

Grafton states that Richmond received intima- 
tion of Richard's design to marry Elizabeth, and to 
give her sister Cecily to " a man found in a cloud 
and of an unknown lineage and family," and that, 
despairing, therefore, of becoming the husband of 
either of Edward the Fourth's daughters, Henry 
sought to strengthen his cause by treating for a 
marriage with the sister of Sir Walter Herbert, a 
person of an ancient family and great influence in 
Wales, whose other sister was the wife of Henry 
Earl of Northumberland, but that his messenger 
to Herbert found it impossible to proceed. The 
inconsistency of one part of this story is so great 
that it is unworthy of credence ; for if Richard 
intended to elevate Elizabeth to the throne, it is 
highly improbable that he would allow her next 
sister to contract an obscure alliance. 

The concluding events of Richard's reign do not 
require to be recapitulated in this work. From the 
commencement of the year 1483, until the acces- 
sion of Henry the Seventh, all which is known of 
Elizabeth is, that it is said she and her cousin the 



Iviii MEMOIR OF 

Earl of Warwick were sent to the castle of Sheriff 
Hutton, in Yorkshire, as soon as Richard heard 
of Richmond's invasion 1 , but this does not agree 
with Brereton's statement that she accompanied 
Lord Stanley to Leicester and saw the corpse of 
Richard. 

Immediately after Henry arrived in London, 
Elizabeth was brought to the metropolis with great 
state, and entrusted to her mother, the Queen dow- 
ager. The nation eagerly expected the fulfilment 
of the King's engagement to marry her, and thus 
unite the representation of the houses of York and 
Lancaster ; but, from a cause which has never been 
explained, their nuptials did not take place for five 
months after his accession. 

Upon Henry's title to the crown some remarks 
will not be considered misplaced, because a new 
fact on the subject has been recently brought to 
light. In discussing it the circumstance will not 
again be adverted to that he had no hereditary 
right whatever, because his mother, through whom 
he descended from the house of Lancaster, was 
alive, for in urging his pretensions he evidently 
alluded to those which he derived from her? 
and it may have been considered that she re- 

1 An interesting little volume, entitled "An Account of Sheriff 
Hutton Castle," has been recently published at York; and its having 
been said that Elizabeth was sent to that place by Richard the Third, 
has induced the author to insert an account of her with a portrait ; 
but nothing occurs in confirmation of that statement. 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. 



signed her claims in his favour, which arrange- 
ment the legislature would probably have sanc- 
tioned, had Parliament recognized his right by 
inheritance. 

His only pretensions by descent, consisted in 
being the representative of the House of Lancas- 
ter, as sole heir of John of Gaunt, and, after the 
death of Henry the Sixth, the next heir of that 
monarch. The superior claims of the House of 
York, from representing Lionel Duke of Clarence, 
the second son of Edward the Third, do not require 
to be pointed out. They were too obvious to de- 
ceive Henry or his advisers; and though it was 
contended that the children of Edward the Fourth 
were illegitimate, that the issue of the Duke of Cla- 
rence were incapable of inheriting in consequence 
of the attainder of their father, and that Richard 
the Third left no issue, still the sisters of those 
princes, or their children, as well as many de- 
scendants of Isabel, the aunt of Edward the Fourth, 
were then in existence ; and unless they too were 
bastardized, or rendered incapable by an act of 
the legislature, they possessed a superior claim to 
any descendant of John of Gaunt. But Henry's 
pretension to be the lineal heir of that personage 
was impeached; and Richard, in a proclamation 
dated on the 23rd of June, 1484, observed that " his 
mother was daughter unto John Duke of Somerset, 
son unto John Earl of Somerset, son unto Dame 
Katherine Swynford, and of their in double avoutry 

i 2 



MEMOIR OF 



gotten 1 ," by which was meant that the Earl of 
Somerset was begotten by John of Gaunt on Kathe- 
rine Swynford, during the lifetime of his wife and 
of her husband ; and though the Beauforts were 
legitimated by the King, and by Parliament, in 
February, 1397, it has hitherto been considered 
that the instrument for the purpose contained a 
special exception against its conferring any right 
to the royal dignity. This, however, was not the 
fact, but it is extremely doubtful if Henry himself 
was aware that his maternal pedigree was free from 
the defect so confidently ascribed to it. The Pa- 
tent of Legitimation, as it was originally granted, 
as it was entered on the Patent Rolls, and as it 
received the sanction of Parliament, rendered the 
issue of John of Gaunt by Katherine Swynford 
capable of taking every species of dignity, honour, 
or office, and removed all objections on the ground 
of impure birth. A few years afterwards, and 
before the year 1407, when Henry the Fourth ex- 
emplified and confirmed the said grant to John 
Beaufort Earl of Somerset, the words " excepta dig- 
nitate regali " were added to the enrolment on the 
Patent Rolls, as an interlineation, though they were 
not inserted in the copy on the Rolls of Parliament, 
and they were also introduced into the exemplifi- 
cation to the Earl of Somerset. But this alteration 

1 Ellis' "Original Letters," Second Series, vol. i., p. 164. An 
article on the subject of the legitimacy of the Earl of Beaufort, and on 
the connexion of John of Gaunt with Katherine Swynford, will be 
found in the " Excerpta Historica," p. 152. 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. l\i 

. 

has no legal effect, because the operative grant is 
that which was sanctioned by Parliament, so that 
the mother of Henry the Seventh was by law the 
lineal heir of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster. 

Sensible that his title to the Crown, by descent, 
was too defective to be urged, but being, at the same 
time, extremely reluctant to acknowledge that he 
was in any way indebted for the throne to his in- 
tended union with the heiress of York, Henry re- 
solved to obtain a recognition of his right by the 
legislature previous to his marriage. A Parlia- 
ment met at Westminster on the 7th of September, 
1485, and one of its first measures was to settle the 
crown. When the commons presented their speaker 
to Henry, he addressed them in a short speech, in 
which he noticed his accession " as well by just 
hereditary title as by the sure judgment of God, 
which was manifested by giving him the victory in 
the field over his enemy V On the accession of 
Henry the Fourth, Edward the Fourth, and Richard 
the Third, the three monarchs in whose favour the 
lineal order of descent was broken, the Act of Set- 
tlement stated their claims to the throne by inherit- 
ance ; but Parliament appears to have grounded 
Henry the Seventh's right on his being King de 
facto, before it met, and to have considered that all 
which was necessary for it to do was to state that 
fact, and to settle the royal dignity upon him and 
the heirs of his body. The Act of Settlement is 

1 Rot. Parl. vi. 268. 



MEMOIR OF 



an usurper. Not satisfied with the admission of his 
alleged right by Parliament, Henry resolved that 
his coronation should also precede his nuptials, and 
on the 30th of October that ceremony took place at 
Westminster. Nearly two months more were al- 
lowed to elapse, and still nothing was done with 
relation to his marriage. Some writers have attri- 
buted the delay to his intending to offer his hand to 
the heiress of Brittany, and it has been generally 
said that he fulfilled his pledge to Elizabeth with 
great reluctance. If it be true that she professed a 
desire to marry Richard the Third, and thus aban- 
doned him for his rival, his coldness, when fortune 
proved propitious, independent of any personal ob- 
jections which he may have entertained, was neither 
surprising nor unnatural. On this subject nothing 
certain is known ; but that some suspicion was felt 
as to his intentions with regard to Elizabeth, and 
that the nation was most anxious for their union, 
is placed beyond a doubt by the petition of the 
commons on the llth of December, 1485, imme- 
diately before the Parliament was prorogued. The 
Speaker, Sir Thomas Lovell, then prayed the King, 
" that in consideration of the right to the realms of 
England and France being vested in his person, and 
the heirs of his body, by the authority of the said 
Parliament, he would be pleased to espouse the 
Lady Elizabeth, daughter of King Edward the 
Fourth, which marriage they hoped God would bless 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. 1 X V 

d 

with a progeny of the race of Kings l , to the great 
satisfaction of the whole realm." The Lords spiritual 
and temporal, rising from their seats, and bowing to 
the throne, expressed their concurrence in the re- 
quest, and Henry answered that he was willing to 
comply with their wishes 2 . 

This intimation was too decisive not to be com- 
plied with, and on the 1 8th of January following the 
nuptials of the King and Elizabeth were solemnized 
with great splendour and magnificence at West- 
minster. The doubt which has been entertained as 
to whether Henry would have fulfilled his engage- 
ment, had he not been addressed in so unequivocal a 
manner by his Parliament, is somewhat strengthened 
by the dates of the bulls for the purpose, the sanc- 
tion of the Holy See being requisite in consequence 
of their being related within the prohibited degrees 
of consanguinity. Application appears to have been 
made to the Pope very soon after the request of the 
Commons, but the first of the three bulls which were 
granted is dated on the 2nd of March, 1485-6, in 
which the importance of the alliance is pointed out, 
and Elizabeth is recognized as the undoubted heir 
and eldest child of Edward the Fourth, but it is 
evident that the Pontitf was ignorant that the mar- 
riage had taken place 3 . Nor does he appear to 
have been aware of the circumstance on the 27th 

i By this expression, "de stirpe regum," Lingard considers that 
the Kings of each line were meant. " History of England," v. 377. 
Rot. Parl. vi. 278. 8 Foedera, xii. 294. 

k 



Ixvi MEMOIR OF 

of that month, when he issued a second rescript, 
confirming the instrument of the 2nd of March ; 
and, after stating that the title of Henry was by 
right of war, by indisputable hereditary succes- 
sion, by the election of his subjects, and by the 
consent of the three estates of the realm, he de- 
nounced the penalties of excommunication to all 
who might rebel against his authority l . 

Power had been delegated to the Bishop of Imola, 
the Pope's legate, to grant a dispensation to any 
twelve persons to marry, notwithstanding the im- 
pediment of consanguinity ; and Henry availed him- 
self of the circumstance to avoid waiting the arrival 
of the permission for which he applied to the Pontiff; 
but doubts arose in the breasts of one or both the 
parties whether their marriage, by virtue of a dis- 
pensation under a delegated authority, and before 
the sanction of the Holy See was obtained, might not 
be impeached as irregular. A third bull was con- 
sequently sought, which was granted on the 27th of 
July. It notices the preceding rescripts, states that 
it was granted at the instance of Henry and Eliza- 
beth, that they had been married by virtue of Imola's 
dispensation, and fully confirms and ratifies their 
union 2 . 

It is manifest from these documents, that the 
dispensation was not applied for until the end of the 
year 1485, whereas, if, from the moment of Henry's 

1 Foedera, xii., p. 297. * Ibid., xii., p. 314. 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. Ixvii 

accession he intended to espouse Elizabeth, it may 
be presumed that a dispensation would have been 
sought some time before, even if he purposed post- 
poning the ceremony until the legislature had re- 
cognized his right to the throne. There is, how- 
ever, an appearance of haste, after an unnecessary 
delay of five months, in his availing himself of the 
power vested in the Pope's legate instead of adopt- 
ing the regular and more dignified course of waiting 
for a specific bull for the purpose from Rome, which 
tends to shew that the nation was impatient for the 
union, and that Henry felt it would be dangerous 
to defer the fulfilment of his engagement. To these 
bulls much importance was attached, as a contem- 
porary states that the King being at Coventry on 
St. George's Day, 1487, at which time he was rais- 
ing forces to subdue the rebellion of the Earl of Lin- 
coln, " the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Bishops 
of Winchester, Ely, London, Worcester, Exeter, and 
the Prior of Coventry, all in pontificalibus, read and 
declared the Pope's bulls, touching the King's and 
Queen's right, and there in the choir, in the Bishop's 
seat, by the authority of the same bulls, cursed with 
book, bell, and candle all those that did anything 
contrary to their right, and approving their titles 
good 1 ." 

It was one of the acts of Henry's first Parliament 
to restore the widow of Edward the Fourth to the 



1 Leland's Collectanea, vol. iv., p. 209. 

k 2 



1XX MEMOIR OF 

to travel she removed to Greenwich, and there kept 
the Feast of All Hallows l . 

About the middle of March, 1487, Henry made 
a progress into Essex, Suffolk, and Norfolk, and 
thence into Warwickshire. On St. George's day 
he was at Coventry 2 , and within three weeks he 
heard of the landing of the Earl of Lincoln and 
Lambert Simnell, in Ireland; for, on the 13th of 
May, being then at Kenilworth, he wrote to the Earl 
of Ormond, the Queen's chamberlain, stating that he 
had received tidings of the landing of the rebels in 
Ireland on the 5th of that month; that he had sent 
to the Queen and his mother to come to him; that 
he wished to have the Earl's advice about subduing 
the rebellion ; and he commanded him, in pursuance 
of his duty of attending on the Queen's person, to 
accompany her to his presence 3 . Her Majesty and 
the Countess of Richmond accordingly joined Henry 
at Kenilworth, and not long after their arrival news 
were brought that the Earl of Lincoln and his ad- 
herents had landed near Furnesse 4 . 

This effort in favour of the first of the impostors 
who disturbed Henry's reign was quelled by the 
battle of Stoke, on the 16th of June ; and as soon as 



1 Leland's Collectanea, vol. iv., p. 207. * Ibid. p. 210. 

3 See a letter, printed in Ellis's " Original Letters," First Series, 
vol. ii., p. 18. The editor of that work, presuming that Perkin War- 
beck and his party were alluded to, has assigned this letter to the 
13th of May, 1492. Very little research would have proved that it was 
written four years earlier, and in reference to a different affair. 

4 Leland's Collectanea, vol. iv., p. 210. 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. 

t 

peace and order were fully re-established, prepara- 
tions were made for the Queen's coronation. In 
September, writs were issued from Warwick, sum- 
moning the peers and others to attend that cere- 
mony on the 25th of November following 1 . Their 
Majesties commenced their journey from Warwick 
on the 27th of October, and celebrated the Feast 
of All Hallows at St. Alban's. Henry was received 
in the metropolis on the 3rd of November as a con- 
queror, in reference to his victory at Stoke, and he 
proceeded to St. Paul's, attended by a numerous 
retinue of lords, knights, and citizens. The Queen, 
the Countess of Richmond, and other ladies of dis- 
tinction, viewed the scene, privately, from a house in 
St. Mary Spitell, without Bishopsgate ; and as soon 
as the procession passed she went to Greenwich. 

On Friday, the 23rd, the Queen left Greenwich by 
water for her coronation, of which a very interest- 
ing narrative is extant 2 . Arrayed in the robes of 
royalty, she was accompanied by the Countess of 
Richmond, her mother-in-law, and by an extensive 
retinue of peers and peeresses, and was escorted by 
the Lord-mayor, sheriffs, and aldermen of London. 
Each Company furnished elegant barges, decorated 
with silk banners and streamers, richly emblazoned 
with the arms and badges, and rowed by men 
dressed in the proper liveries, of the respective 
crafts. Amidst the various objects of attraction, 

1 Leland's " Collectanea," vol. iv., p. 216. 
2 Ibid., p. 216-223. 



MEMOIR OF 



the Bachelor's barge claimed particular notice for 
its superior splendour, and from its carrying a red 
dragon, the ensign of the house of Tudor, which 
spouted fire into the Thames. Music of all kinds 
lent its aid to enliven the scene, and, thus attended, 
her Majesty arrived at the Tower. As she entered 
it, she was received by the King in the most gra- 
cious manner, or, to use the words of the narrator 
himself, " the King's highness welcomed her in 
such manner and form, as was to all the estates 
and others there being present a very good sight, 
and right joyous and comfortable to behold." Ele- 
ven Knights of the Bath were then created ; and 
on the next day, after dinner, her Majesty being 
" royally apparelled, in a kirtle of white cloth of 
gold of damask, and a mantle of the same suit, 
furred with ermine, fastened before her breast with 
a great lace, curiously wrought of gold and silk, 
and rich knobs of gold at the end, tasselled ; 
her fair yellow hair hanging down plain behind 
her back, with a call of pipes over it, and wear- 
ing on her head a circle of gold, richly garnished 
with precious stones," quitted her chamber of 
state. Her train was borne by her sister, the Lady 
Cecily, and being attended by a great retinue 
of lords, ladies, and others, she entered her litter, 
in which she was conveyed to Westminster. Most 
of the streets, which were lined with the city com- 
panies in their liveries, were hung with tapestry and 
arras, whilst in Cheapside, and some other places, 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. 



rich cloths of gold and velvets and silks were dis- 
played. The houses were filled with spectators, 
and the crowd is represented as being immense, all 
eager to " see the Queen in her royal apparel," a 
feeling which had perhaps a deeper source than the 
gratification of idle curiosity. Children, in the 
dresses of angels and virgins, were placed in various 
parts, who sung the Queen's praises as she passed ; 
and, preceded by the Duke of Bedford as Lord Stew- 
ard, the Earl of Oxford as Great Chamberlain, the 
Earl of Derby as Constable, and the Earl of Not- 
tingham as Marshal of England, by the Duke of 
Suffolk, the Lord Mayor, Garter King of Arms, the 
Heralds, and other official persons, and by the newly 
made Knights of the Bath, with their banners borne 
before them, her Majesty proceeded through the 
city, sitting in her litter, under a canopy borne by 
Knights of the body. Her sister Cecily, her aunt 
the Duchess of Bedford, the Duchesses of Norfolk 
and Suffolk, the Countess of Oxford, in two chairs, 
and six Baronesses, mounted on palfreys, imme- 
diately followed the Queen ; and in this order the 
procession arrived at Westminster, where she slept. 
The next morning she was arrayed in a kirtle and 
mantle of purple velvet, furred with ermine laced 
in front, and wore in her hair a circle of gold richly 
set with pearls and other jewels. In this dress, she 
proceeded to Westminster Hall, where she remained 
under a canopy of state until the procession was 
ready. From the place where she stood to the 



Ixxiv MEMOIR OF 

pulpit in the Abbey the ground was covered with 
new ray cloth, and the struggle of the crowd to cut 
it to pieces after she passed was extremely great. 
The Earl of Arundel bore the staff with the dove, 
the Duke of Suffolk the sceptre, and the Duke 
of Bedford, who was bareheaded, the crown. On 
one side, her Majesty was supported by the Bishop 
of Winchester, and on the other, by the Bishop 
of Ely, and she was immediately followed by the 
Princess Cecily, who held her train. In this order 
she entered the west door of Westminster Abbey, 
and took her seat near the pulpit, when the usual 
ceremonies were performed ; after which she re- 
turned to the Palace at Westminster. The King was 
a spectator from a handsome latticed stage, between 
the pulpit and the high altar, where also stood his 
mother, and many other ladies of rank. 

An account of the dinner, including even the 
dishes, is extant, at which it would appear, that those 
only who formed part of the procession were pre- 
sent, the King and his mother viewing it privately 
from a latticed seat or stage, erected out of a window 
on the left side of the Hall. The words in which 
the author concludes his narrative of the Queen's 
coronation convey an idea of the deep interest which 
the country felt on the subject, "And then the 
Queen departed with God's blessing, and to the re- 
joicing of many a true Englishman's heart 1 ." 

1 He uses nearly the same expression when speaking of the birth of 






ELIZABETH OF YORK. | X .\V 

The next morning the King and Queen, with 
their court, heard mass in St. Stephen's chapel, 
after which " she kept her estate " in the Parliament 
Chamber, the King's mother sitting on her right 
hand, the Duchess of Bedford, her aunt, on her 
left, and her sister Cecily at the end of the table. 
At the side table sat the Duchesses of Suffolk 
and Norfolk, the Countesses of Oxford, Wiltshire, 
Rivers, and Nottingham, many Baronesses, and the 
ladies attached to the Queen's person. After din- 
ner her Majesty and the qther ladies danced ; and 
the following day she returned to Greenwich, in 
consequence of Parliamentary business, which pre- 
vented the continuance of the feast l . 

From the moment in which Elizabeth of York 
became Queen of England her life loses its political 
interest, and the few incidents illustrative of her 
domestic habits and of her personal character which 
are preserved, are to be gathered from the account 
of the private expenses of herself and her hus- 

Prince Arthur, " over all Te Deum laudamus songen with ringing of 
bells, and in the most parte fire's made in the praising of God and the 
rejoicing of every true Englishman." Leland's " Collectanea," iv. 204. 
1 The coronation was attended by fifteen Bishops, seventeen Ab- 
bots, two Dukes, twelve Earls, two Viscounts, twenty Barons, the 
heirs apparent of the Earls of Suffolk and Devonshire ; the King's 
mother, and the Lady Cecily, the Queen's sister, three Duchesses, 
four Countesses, seven Baronesses, thirty-one Knight Bannerets, one 
hundred and fifty Knights, besides their wives and other gentle women ; 
but neither the Queen's mother, nor any of her sisters, excepting 
Cecily, appear to have been present. Leland's " Collectanea," vol. 
iv., p. 216 to 233. 

1 2 



MEMOIR OF 



band. It has been asserted that Henry treated her 
with austerity and unkindness, and that her hap- 
piness was seriously affected both by his conduct 
towards her, and by his severity towards her mother. 
Bacon remarks, " that he shewed himself no very 
indulgent husband towards her, though she was 
beautiful, gentle, and fruitful; but his aversion 
towards the House of York was so predominant in 
him as it found place not only in his wars and coun- 
cils but in his chamber and bed V There seems, 
however, to be as little proof that Henry behaved 
ill to his Queen, as that his conduct towards her 
mother was cruel or rapacious. Dr. Lingard is 
the first historian who has suggested that these 
charges are partially, if not wholly, unfounded 2 ; 
and the conclusions to be drawn from the Privy Purse 
Expenses of the King, to which that writer had not 
access, fully justify the view which he has taken of 
Henry's behaviour as a husband. It has been ob- 
served by an able delineator of the human character, 
who has assumed that the ill treatment of Elizabeth 
Wydeville, and of her daughter, by Henry, actually 
occurred, that " if the Queen loved her mother with 
that feminine filial tenderness which is heightened 
by participation in calamity, she could not possibly 
have cherished much affection for her husband 3 ." 



1 "History of Henry the Seventh," ed. 1825, vol. iii., p. 122. 

* " History of England," vol. v., pp. 379, 389, 398-9. 

3 See a memoir of Elizabeth, Queen of Henry the Seventh, in 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. Ixxvii 

Q 

Both these questions are so closely connected with 
the life of Elizabeth of York, that it is requisite to 
discuss them. 

On the accession of Henry the Seventh, he found 
the late Queen one of the most pitiable objects in 
his dominions. Stripped of her dignity and estates, 
her honour and virtue impeached, her children 
bastardized, her kindred banished and attainted, 
and herself destitute of any other means of sup- 
port than the annuity of 2331. , which Richard the 
Third granted her *. It seems scarcely possible 
for Henry to have increased the misery of her situ- 
ation, excepting by depriving her of liberty ; but 
if historians are to be credited, he seized on all 
her possessions, and, from a suspicion of her having 
countenanced the rebellion of the Earl of Lincoln, 
in 1487, imprisoned her for life in the Monastery of 
Bermondsey, the pretext being, that, after having 
consented to her daughter's marriage with him, she 
delivered her into the hands of Richard the Third. 

Nothing can be more untrue than part, or more 
absurd than all these statements. It was among the 
earliest acts of Henry's reign 2 to restore her to her 
fame as a woman, and to her dignity as a Queen, 
by reversing the statute which had deprived her of 

Lodge's "Illustrious Portraits." That writer was, however, mis- 
taken on the subject, for he says it was one of the first acts of Henry's 
reign to seize on all her estates, and to imprison her for life at Ber- 
mondsey. 

1 See page xlii., ante. * Rot. Parl., vi., 289. 



Ixxviii MEMOIR OF 

both ; and as that act did not vest in her any of the 
lands which were forfeited by the statute that de- 
graded her, the King, by letters patent, dated on the 
4th of March, 1486, granted her various lordships for 
life 1 , as part of the dower belonging to her after the 
death of Edward the Fourth ; and the next day he 
granted her, in full satisfaction of the residue of her 
dower, 102/. per annum out of the fee farm of the 
town of Bristol. Instead of being exiled from her 
daughter's court, she was the only godmother to 
Prince Arthur, and attended at the font. The period 
when it is said she was placed in confinement is 
about June, 1487, whereas, in November of that 
year, Henry evinced his confidence in her by treat- 
ing for her marriage with his ally the King of Scots, 
" for the greater increase of the love and amity 
between them ;" agreeing, at the same time, that 
James, the second son of that monarch, should marry 
the Princess Katherine, and that the Prince of Scot- 
land should marry another of the daughters of Ed- 
ward the Fourth 2 . Had Elizabeth Wydeville in- 
curred his displeasure for aiding the revolt of the 
Earl of Lincoln, a thing in itself incredible, and 
been confined lest she should divulge the secret 
that her son, the Duke of York, was still living, or 
had Henry not felt assured that she was persuaded 

1 Rot. Patent. 1 Henry VII., p. 3 m 25, namely, Waltham, Badowe 
Magna, Masshebury, Dunmore, Lieghes, and Farnhara, in Essex. 
8 Foedera, vol. xii., p. 329. 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. 



of the death of her sons Edward the Fifth and his 
brother, would he have given her the opportunity 
of plotting against him which her situation as Queen 
of Scotland would afford her l ? 

The projected alliances were interrupted by the 
rebellion of the Scotch barons, and were finally 
frustrated by the death of the King of Scots, in 
June, 1488 ; but proof exists that the Dowager 
Queen was occasionally about the court subsequent 
to that year, for shortly after her daughter " took 
her chamber" for her confinement in November, 
1489, she gave an audience to the French am- 
bassadors, " when her mother, Queen Elizabeth, 
and my Lady, the King's mother," are mentioned 
as being present 2 . The latest notice of her in re- 
lation to Henry the Seventh is on the 19th of 
February, 1490, when he assigned her an annual 
pension of 400/. a year, a sum fully adequate to 
her wants even, but which does not appear to be 
the case, if it were given in lieu of the lands granted 
her in the first year of his reign 8 . Her will has 
been considered evidence of her destitution and im- 
prisonment, but such an interpretation of that do- 
cument is not just. It is dated on the 10th of 
April, 1492, and from being witnessed by the Abbot 
of Bermondsey, she may be supposed to have been 

1 Dr. Lingard's remarks on this subject are most satisfactory and 
conclusive. Vol. v., p. 328-9. 
8 Leland's Collectanea, vol. iv., p. 249. 
Patent. 5 Hen. VII., m 20. 



1XXX MEMOIR OF 

then an inmate of that monastery. She styles her- 
self Queen of England, and orders her body to be 
buried at Windsor, with her late husband, King 
Edward, but forbids any pomp or great expense 
on the occasion ; directions which indicate that she 
would be interred wherever she might desire, and 
that her funeral would be conducted, not like that 
of a disgraced prisoner, but according to her ele- 
vated rank. She proceeds, " whereas I have no 
worldly goods to do the Queen's grace, my dearest 
daughter, a pleasure with, neither to reward any 
of my children according to my heart and mind ; 
I beseech Almighty God to bless her Grace, with 
all her noble issue, and with as good heart and 
mind as is to me possible, I give her Grace my 
blessing, and all the foresaid my children." Her 
not having any property to bequeath arose from her 
interest in her income and lands being for life only, 
and not, as has been supposed, from Henry's having 
seized her estates. Such " small stuff and goods " 
as she possessed she desired might be appropriated 
to the payment of her debts, and the health of her 
soul, as far as they would extend, but " if any of 
her blood " wished any part of her property, she 
ordered them to be allowed the preference. The 
Prior of Shene, and Doctors Sutton and Brente, 
were her executors, and she entreated " her dearest 
daughter, the Queen," and her son, the Marquis of 
Dorset, to assist in seeing her wishes fulfilled. An 
account of her funeral, and of the attention and 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. ft IxXXJ 

kindness of her daughters to her in her illness, is 
extant l . 

Thus, so far from Henry the Seventh having de- 
spoiled his mother-in-law of her estates, she had 
none of which she could be deprived ; instead of 
increasing her unhappiness, he restored her to fame 
and rank, and granted her a competence ; instead of 
feeling hostility towards her, he allowed her to be the 
sponsor to the Prince of Wales, in preference to his 
own mother ; instead of suspecting her of the absurd 
intention of plotting against him, and consequently 
against a daughter whom she dearly loved, and im- 
prisoning her for life to prevent similar dangers, he 
agreed to marry her to an independent sovereign, 
and two of her daughters to that sovereign's sons, 
with the view of strengthening the alliance between 
the two countries ; and, instead of keeping her a 
close prisoner at Bermondsey, she was present at 
her daughter's reception of an ambassador who 
claimed to be related to the Queen, some time after 
the event which it is said produced Henry's rigorous 
treatment. Such, however, is history as it is repre- 
sented by chroniclers, and such are the effects of 
historians repeating the statements of their prede- 
cessors, without inquiring whether records do not, 
as in this instance, establish the ignorance or the 
prejudices of writers to whom implicit credence has 
been generally given. 

> In one of the MSS. of the Royal Society, which is about to be 
transferred to the Museum ; but, as the arrangement is not yet 
pleted, access could not be obtained to it. 



IxXXll MEMOIR OF 

Though the evidence of the injustice which has 
been done to the character of Henry the Seventh, 
with regard to his treatment of his Queen, is not so 
complete as in relation to his conduct to her mother, 
it seems impossible to reconcile the notices of her 
in his privy purse expenses, or the manner in which 
he always spoke of her in his letters, with the idea 
that he was wanting in tenderness or affection. 

In November and December, 1487, and in Fe- 
bruary, 1492, numerous lordships and manors were 
granted to her for life, which grants were confirmed 
by Parliament 1 ; and it was enacted in 1487, that 
in consideration of the great expense which she 
must bear in her chamber, and otherwise, she should 
be enabled to sell and grant leases in her own name 
without the consent of the King 2 . 

On St. George's Day, 1488, Henry was at Wind- 
sor, on which occasion the Queen and the Countess 
of Richmond 3 , from whom, indeed, she appears to 
have been rarely separated, were present, each being 
habited in a gown of the Order of the Garter ; but 
he deferred the solemnization of the feast of that 
Saint until the Sunday following, in the afternoon of 
which day the King, and the Knights of the Garter, 
rode to the College, and were accompanied by the 
Queen and her suite. Her Majesty, and the Countess 
of Richmond, again wore the livery of the Order, 



1 Rot. Par!., vi., 386, 442, 446. 8 Ibid., p. 387. 

8 Iceland's " Collectanea," iv., 238. 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. , Ixxxiii 

and rode in a rich chair, covered with cloth of gold, 
drawn by six horses, trapped in a similar manner, 
and followed by a suite of twenty-one ladies, among 
whom was her sister the Princess Anne, dressed in 
crimson velvet gowns, and mounted on white pal- 
freys, the saddles of which were made of cloth of 
gold, and the trappings covered with white roses, 
the badge of the House of York '. The Feast of 
Whitsuntide, in the same year, was also kept at 
Windsor; after which the Court removed to Wood- 
stock, thence, at Allhallow's-tide, to Windsor, and 
from Windsor their Majesties went to Westminster 2 . 
At Christmas they were at Shene, where the Queen 
was attended by the Countess of Richmond and her 
sister Anne, and spent the festival of Easter 1489 at 
Hertford, whence the King proceeded to the north ; 
but it does not seem that the Queen accompanied 
him 3 . 

In November following Elizabeth prepared for her 
confinement, by " taking her chamber," as it was 
termed, with the usual ceremonies, her own mother 
and her mother-in-law being present ; and on the 
29th of that month she was delivered of her second 
child, who, the next day, was baptized by the name 
of Margaret, and became the progenitrix of every 
monarch of these realms, since the death of Queen 
Elizabeth. The infant derived her name from her 



Leland's " Collectanea," iv., pp. 239, 241. 
Ibid, pp. 243, '244. 3 ibid., p. 247. 

m 2 



MEMOIR OF 



godmother, the Countess of Richmond, who pre- 
sented her with a small box of silver gilt filled with 
gold 1 . In consequence of the measles breaking out 
in the palace, the Queen was privately churched on 
the 27th, and removed to Greenwich on the 29th of 
December. On the 2nd of February, 1490, the King, 
the Queen, the King's mother, and the greater part 
of the Lords spiritual and temporal, went in proces- 
sion to Westminster Hall, and heard divine service, 
and at night a play was performed before their Ma- 
jesties, and their attendants, at Whitehall 2 . 

From this time the authentic narrative printed in 
Leland's " Collectanea " ceases to afford any infor- 
mation of Henry's Court, and the few additional 
facts in the life of his Queen must be gleaned almost 
entirely from the privy purse expenses of her hus- 
band between the years 1492 and 1503, and from 
her own expenses between March, 1502 and the 
February following. In the former she is only in- 
cidentally mentioned, because their establishments 
were wholly distinct from each other; but the latter, 
which contain almost a diary of her proceedings in 
the last year of her life, throw much light upon her 
character, and excite regret that similar accounts of 
previous years have not been discovered. 

On the 28th of June, 1491, at Greenwich, the 
Queen gave birth to her second son, Henry, after- 



1 Leland's " Collectanea," pp. 253, 254. 
8 Ibid., vol. iv., p. 254 to 256. 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. IxXXV 

% 

wards King Henry the Eighth J ; and on the 2nd of 
July, 1492, her daughter Elizabeth was born, who 
died an infant on the 4th of September, 1495 2 . 
Whilst at Shene, in April, 1494, one hundred pounds 
were lent her by the King 3 . In the summer of 
1495 she accompanied his Majesty in his progress 
into the north ; and on the 2nd of August a woman 
was rewarded for singing before the King and Queen 
at Latham, in Derbyshire 4 . They returned to Shene 
on the 16th of October 5 ; and on the 16th of No- 
vember in that year they honoured the Sergeants' 
Feast at Ely Place with their presence 6 . Twenty- 
seven pounds were given her by Henry's orders on 
the 1st of February, 1496 7 ; and on the same day in 
the next year two thousand pounds were lent to her 
to pay her debts 8 . Thirty pounds were presented 
to her, at Greenwich, by the King, in the May fol- 
lowing, to purchase jewels 9 ; and in April, 1498, 
61. 13s. 4d. were given her, possibly to gratify her 
caprice in the purchase of some trifle which struck 
her attention 10 . 

Sandford 11 states that the Queen was confined in 
1498 with her daughter the Princess Mary, after- 



1 Sandford's " Genealogical History," ed. 1707, p. 479. 
* Ibid., pp. 477, 478. 8 " Excerpta Historica," p. 97. 

4 Ibid., p. 104. * Ibid., p. 105. 

8 Bacon's " History of Henry the Seventh," and " Excerpta His- 
torica," p. 106. 

7 " Excerpta Historica," p. 107. 8 Ibid., p. 111. 

9 Ibid., p. 112. 10 Ibid., p. 117. 

11 "Genealogical History," p. 536. 



MEMOIR OF 



wards Queen of France, though he does not mention 
in what month ; but the notice of a payment of 
3/. 6y. 8d. to Robert Taylor, the Queen's surgeon, 
on the 27th of May *, tends to fix the date of the 
Princess's birth to about that time, the sum in ques-. 
tion probably being the payment for his services, or, 
which is more likely, a present on the occasion. Her 
Majesty was again confined on the 21st of February, 
1498-9, when her third and youngest son, Prince 
Edmund, was born at Greenwich 2 . He was chris- 
tened on the 24th, being held at the font by his 
godmother, the Countess of Richmond, after whose 
husband, Edmund, Earl of Richmond, his grand- 
father, he was named. It was customary for the 
King's children to be baptized in the font of Canter- 
bury cathedral, perhaps from some imaginary virtue 
which it was presumed to possess, and the expenses 
of bringing it on this occasion, of 6s. 8d. to the 
bearer and 21. to the servant of the Prior of Christ 
Church of Canterbury, are entered in the King's 
privy purse accounts 3 . The young prince died at 
Bishop's Stortford, in Hertfordshire 4 , about April, 
1500, as in May in that year 242/. 11s. Sd. were 
paid for the costs of his burial, independent of fees 
to the Abbot and Convent of Westminster 5 . In 
March, 1502, the Queen received five hundred 
pounds as a loan on the security of some plate 6 , a 

1 " Excerpta Historica," p. 117. * Sandford, p. 477. 

3 " Excerpta Historica," p. 121. 4 Sandford, p. 477. 

* " Excerpta Historica," p. 124. 6 Ibid., p. 127. 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. Ixxxvii 

fact indicative of the rigorous correctness with 
which the King's accounts were kept, security being 
taken for a loan to his consort. 

The ceremony of affiancing the Princess Marga- 
ret, the Queen's eldest daughter, to James King of 
Scotland, took place at St. Paul's, in January, 1502, 
when the King, Queen, and all the Royal Family, 
except the Prince of Wales, were present, including 
Katherine Lady Courtenay, her Majesty's sister. 
As soon as the ceremony was over the Queen took 
the young Queen of Scots by the hand, and they 
" both dined at the same mess covered," and jousts, 
and feastings, a pageant, and other festivities, for 
some days, testified the importance which was at- 
tached to the event l . 

Their Majesties experienced a heavy affliction by 
the death of their eldest son Arthur Prince of Wales, 
who expired in Ludlow Castle, on the 2nd of April, 
1502, within five months of his marriage to Kathe- 
rine of Castile ; an event which was celebrated 
with every token of joy and magnificence on the 
14th of the preceding November. The conduct of 
the Queen on the death of the Prince has been 
minutely described. The news was communicated 

1 Leland's " Collectanea," iv., 258 to 264. The journal of the 
herald who accompanied the young Queen of Scots to Edinburgh, 
which is printed in that volume, is extremely interesting, and conveys 
a better idea of the state of society amongst persons of rank in the 
early part of the sixteenth century than perhaps any other article 
extant. If reprinted with notes, and with the orthography modernized, 
it could scarcely fail to be generally read. 



Ixxxviii MEMOIR OF 

to the King by his confessor, and he immediately 
sent for her. Finding him overwhelmed with grief 
she suppressed her emotions, and strove to console 
her afflicted husband ; and it was not until she re- 
tired to the privacy of her own chamber that she 
gave vent to her maternal sorrow, when Henry, in 
his turn, sought to relieve her anguish by his ten- 
derness. The whole scene is so pathetically de- 
scribed by a contemporary, and the account tends so 
much to disprove the common opinion, that they lived 
unhappily together, that the passage will be given : 
" Immediately after Arthur's death, Sir Richard 
Poole, his Chamberlain, with other of his Counsel, 
wrote and sent letters to the King and Counsel, at 
Greenwich, where his Grace and the Queen's lay, 
and certified them of the Prince's departure. The 
which Counsel discreetly sent for the King's ghostly 
father, a friar observant, to whom they showed this 
most sorrowful and heavy tidings, and desired him 
in his best manner to show it to the King. He, in 
the morning of the Tuesday following, somewhat 
before the time accustomed, knocked at the King's 
chamber door, and when the King understood it was 
his confessor, he commanded to let him in. The 
confessor then commanded all those present to avoid, 
and after due salutation began to say ' Si bona de 
manu Dei suscipimus, mala autem quare non sus- 
tineamus,' and so showed his Grace that his dearest 
son was departed to God. When his Grace under- 
stood that sorrowful heavy tidings, he sent for the 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. IxXXlX 



Queen, saying that he and his Queen would take 
the painful sorrows together. After that she was 
come and saw the King her lord, and that natural 
and painful sorrow, as I have heard say, she, with 
full great and constant comfortable words besought 
his Grace that he would first after God remember 
the weal of his own noble person, the comfort of his 
realm, and of her. She then said, that my lady, 
his mother, had never no more children but him 
only, and that God by his grace had ever preserved 
him, and brought him where that he was. Over 
that, how that God had left him yet a fair prince, 
two fair princesses ; and that God is where he was, 
and we are both young enough ; and that the pru- 
dence and wisdom of his Grace sprung over all 
Christendom, so that it should please him to take 
this according thereunto. Then the King thanked 
her of her good comfort. After that she was de- 
parted and come to her own chamber, natural and 
motherly remembrance of that great loss smote her 
so sorrowful to the heart, that those that were about 
her were fain to send for the King to comfort her. 
Then his Grace, of true, gentle, and faithful love, 
in good haste came and relieved her, and showed 
her how wise counsel she had given him before ; 
and he, for his part, would thank God for his son, 
and would she should do in like wise 1 ." 



1 An Account of the Death and Interment of Prince Arthur, printed 
from a contemporary MS. in Leland's " Collectanea," vol. v., p. 373. 



XC MEMOIR OF 

The widowed Princess was immediately sent for 
from Ludlow, and the Queen presented her with a 
litter, covered with black velvet and black cloth, 
with a valance and fringes of the same colour, for 
her conveyance l . The unhappy Katherine was 
placed at Croydon, and appears to have been treated 
with great kindness by her mother-in-law. 

In December, 1502, ten shillings were paid the 
Queen, out of the King's privy purse, for the dis- 
guisings, and twenty pounds were given her for 
some furs which had been purchased 2 . These 
entries, as well as others which occur at various 
times, of money paid for gold wire for her use 3 , 
for a corporas or communion cloth for her 4 , and for 
gold frontlets or head bands 5 , if not conclusive 
proofs that they lived on terms of harmony, are at 
least indicative of trifling but gratifying attentions 
on his part which it would be difficult to reconcile 
with habitual unkindness and severity. An ex- 
change of presents between them seems not to have 
been unusual ; and as those from the Queen were 
such as required the exercise of female skill, it is 
reasonable to presume that they derived their chief 
value from being the work of her own hands. It 
may be inferred, from the payment by the Queen 
of five pounds for two sorts of gold and of silk, for 
making a lace and buttons for the King's mantle of 



1 See page 103. 8 " Excerpta Historica," p. 129. 

3 Ibid., p. 89. * Ibid., p. 91. 

5 Ibid., p. 96, and See p. 197 of this volume. 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. Xci 

the Order of the Garter, on the 29th of April, 
1502 1 , that on St. George's day in that year she 
presented him with a mantle to wear at the feast of 
the Order ; and previous to Henry's expedition into 
Scotland in 1497, she garnished his helmet with 
jewels 2 . 

Of the last year of Elizabeth's existence minute 
information is contained in the accounts of her ex- 
penditure printed in this volume, and a statement 
of the most interesting facts, in illustration of her 
pursuits and character, may be acceptable. 

Those accounts commence on the 25th of March, 
1502, and the first entry is of money and clothes 
given to thirty -seven poor women, a number always 
regulated by the age of the donor, on Shire Thurs- 
day ; which is followed by the Queen's offerings on 
Easter day, by rewards for the performance of vi- 
carious pilgrimages, and by donations to various 
shrines, anchoresses, and other holy persons. Her 
Majesty was then at Westminster, but she soon 
afterwards went to Richmond, and on the 2nd of 
April removed by water to Greenwich, where she 
remained until the 27th, when she was conveyed in 
her barge to the Tower. She returned to Green- 
wich on the 2nd of May, went again to Richmond 
on the 19th, and continued there until the 4th of 
June ; and on the 6th she went to Westminster, but 
returned to Richmond on the llth of that month. 



1 See p. 8. * " Excerpta Historica," p. 1 12. 

n 2 



XC11 MEMOIR OF 

On the 17th of June her Majesty was at Windsor, 
where she remained until the 12th of July, when 
she proceeded to Woodstock, and arrived there on 
the 14th, having at Notley received intimation of 
the death of her nephew, Lord Edward Courtenay. 
Whilst at Woodstock the Queen was taken ill, when 
she endeavoured to propitiate Heaven by offerings 
to the altar of the Virgin, and by masses. On her 
recovery she made a progress into Wales, which was 
commenced about the 4th of August ; she reached 
Flexley Abbey on the 6th, and on the 14th was at 
Monmouth, from which place she went to Troy, 
thence to Ragland on the 19th, and to Chepstow on 
the 28th, and crossed the Severn near Bristol. Her 
Majesty returned through Walstone, and Berkeley, 
where she rested from the 29th of August to the 
4th of September, Beverstone, Cotes Place, Fair- 
ford, where she stopped from the 10th to the 14th, 
and arrived at Langley on the 16th of September, 
having been absent about six weeks. 

O 

The Queen continued at Langley until the 3rd 
of October ; she was at Minster Lovell on the 6th, at 
Ewelm on the 13th, at Easthampstead on the 16th, 
and reached Richmond before the 25th. From the 
27th of October to the 14th of November she was at 
Westminster, and on the 3rd made her offering at 
the celebration of the obit of Edmund, Earl of Rich- 
mond, the King's father, in Westminster Abbey. In 
expectation of her confinement, two nurses, one of 
whom was a French woman, waited upon her on 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. XC111 

the 13th and 16th. From Westminster the Queen 
removed, on the 14th of November, to Greenwich ; 
and thence, on the 19th, to Baynard's Castle, where 
presents of various descriptions were brought to her 
on the 23rd. On the 26th she went to Westminster, 
where she remained until the 12th of December; 
she went thence to the Tower ; on the 21st she 
went to Mortlake ; and on the 14th of January was 
conveyed in her barge from Hampton Court to 
Richmond. 

Her confinement rapidly approached, and on the 
26th of January she took possession of her apart- 
ments in the Tower in readiness for that event. 
On the 2nd of February she was delivered of a 
daughter, who was named Katherine : within a 
few days her Majesty was taken alarmingly ill, 
and a messenger, who travelled night and day, was 
sent by Henry into Kent, for Dr. Aylsworth, a phy- 
sician, to attend her, but every effort was unavail- 
ing, and she died on the anniversary of her birth, 
the llth of February, 1503, having completed her 
thirty-eighth year. The child, whose life was thus 
dearly purchased, quickly followed its mother to 
her grave ; and the only notice of the young prin- 
cess in these accounts is that some flannel was 
bought for her use. 

Historians and chroniclers concur in represent- 
ing the character of Elizabeth of York in the most 
favourable colours, adding that her virtues obtained 



XC1V MEMOIR OF 



for her the title of " The good Queen Elizabeth ;" 
and every fact, with the exception of the letter 
noticed by Bucke, upon which enough has been 
said, tends to prove the justice of those statements. 
The energy and talents of Henry the Seventh left 
no opportunity for his Queen to display any other 
qualities than those which peculiarly, and it may 
be said exclusively, belong to her sex. From the 
time of her marriage she is only to be heard of as a 
daughter, a wife, a mother, a sister, and an aunt ; 
and in each of those relations, so far as materials 
exist by which it can be judged, her conduct reflects 
honour upon her memory. To her widowed and 
afflicted mother she exhibited the tenderest affec- 
tion, which is touchingly commemorated in Eliza- 
beth Wydeville's will. To her husband her be- 
haviour has not only been unimpeached, but it is 
described as ill meriting the return which some 
writers, it is presumed erroneously, state that it 
met with. Her treatment of her children has 
never been censured, and this negative admission of 
its propriety is the only evidence which is likely to 
be found on such a subject. To judge, however, 
from the frequent notices of them in these accounts, 
from her affliction at the loss of her eldest son, and 
her attention to his widow, it would appear to have 
been consistent with the other parts of her character. 
Besides allowing her sisters annuities, out of her 
limited resources, she wholly supported her nephews 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. XCV 

% 

and niece, the young Courtenays, and on every 
public occasion one of her sisters was about her 
person. Old servants of her father, and a man who 
had lent her uncle, the Earl Rivers, a house just be- 
fore his execution, are mentioned as having partaken 
of her bounty. To her religious duties she paid the 
most rigid attention, and her charitable disposition 
displayed itself in maintaining children, in burying 
criminals, in remunerating persons who incurred 
losses, or who were injured in her service, in paying 
the expenses of individuals taking the veil or en- 
tering a monastery, and in presents of money to 
purchase horses, wedding clothes, &c. 

With such evidence before him the biographer 
of Elizabeth of York may safely ascribe to her most, 
if not all, of the virtues which adorn the female 
character; and this summary of her merits may be 
closed with the panegyric of one who was fre- 
quently admitted to her presence, without fearing 
that the language of flattery is substituted for that 
of truth : " She exhibited from her very cradle, 
towards God an admirable fear and service ; towards 
her parents a wonderful obedience; towards her 
brothers and sisters an almost incredible love ; to- 
wards the poor, and the ministers of Christ a re- 
verend and singular affection V 

Her person is described as having been beautiful, 
and the portraits which are extant do not contradict 

i Bernard Andreas, the Poet Laureate and Biographer of Henry 
the Seventh. Cottonian MS:, Domitian A xviii. 



XCV1 MEMOIR OF 

the opinion. Of her acquirements little is known, 
excepting on the doubtful authority of Brereton, 
who represents her as being able to write French 
and Spanish. It is remarkable that not one of 
her letters is known to be preserved, and even her 
autograph is rarely to be met with. One piece of 
her writing, before the death of her father, which 
occurred in a book that belonged to her, is inserted 
in a volume of the Cottonian Manuscripts, in the 
British Museum, and has been lately engraved l , 

" Thys Boke ys myn Elysabeth the Kyngys dawghtyr." 

In a valuable missal 2 which belonged to a female 
friend of Henry the Seventh and his Queen, he 
wrote, with his own hand, 

" Madame I pray you Remembre me your lovyng maister, 
Henry R. ;" 

and her Majesty added immediately below, 

" Madam I pray you forget not me to pray to God that I may have 
part of your prayers, Elysabeth y e Queene." 

Her signature is also attached to each page of 
the earlier part of these accounts. 

The Queen's amusements consisted in witnessing 
the feats of players, dancers, and other performers ; 

1 "Royal and Noble Autographs," by J. Gough Nichols, and 
T. Smith ; a publication of considerable interest. 

" Now in the possession of George Wilkinson, of Tottenham- 
Green, Esq. 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. g XCVll 

in listening to minstrels and musicians; in playing 
at dice, cards, and the tables ; and, from her keeping 
greyhounds, and purchasing arrows and broad heads, 
she, as was common with ladies at the period, ap- 
pears to have partaken of the pleasures of the chace. 

The Queen was buried with great pomp, and it is 
evident that Henry paid all possible respect to her 
remains. More than one description of her funeral 
is preserved, but the fullest account is printed 
in the " Antiquarian Repertory '," where a draw- 
ing of the procession occurs. That narrative states, 
that " her death was as heavy and dolorous to 
the King's Highness as hath been seen or heard 
of, and also in like wise to all the estates of this 
realm, as well citizens as commons, for she was one 
of the most gracious and best beloved Princesses 
in the world in her time being." After giving orders 
about her funeral Henry is said to have " departed 
to a solitary place to pass his sorrow, and would no 
man should resort to him but those whom he had 
appointed." On the day following her death, six 
hundred and thirty-six masses were said in London, 
and the King sent Sir Charles Somerset and Sir 
Richard Guildford with " the best comfort to all the 
Queen's servants, that hath been seen of a Sovereign 
Lord, with as good words." 

Her corpse being embalmed immediately after 
she expired, it was placed in a leaden coffin, on 
which there was an inscription, stating her name 

> Ed. 1807, vol. iv., p. 654. 



XCV111 MEMOIR OF 

and rank. This coffin was enclosed in another of 
wood, covered with white and black velvet, having 
a cross of white damask thereon. On the next day, 
Sunday, the 12th of February, the Queen's body 
was removed from her chamber to the chapel of the 
Tower, attended by the Dean of Westminster, and 
the Dean and Chaplains of the King's Chapel. 
Four Knights supported the canopy ; and persons 
of the highest rank " laid their hands to the corpse." 
Lady Elizabeth Stafford acted as principal mourner 
on the occasion, being followed by all the other 
ladies of her Majesty's household, two and two, 
wearing their plainest attire. As soon as the body 
reached the chapel it was placed under a rich hearse, 
covered with a cloth of black velvet, having thereon 
a cross of cloth of gold. The King's Chaplain then 
read the psalter, lauds, and commendations, after 
which the Dean of the Chapel, with the Peers, 
Officers of Arms, and others went to the great 
chamber to escort the ladies to the mass of requiem. 
Katherine Lady Courtenay, the Queen's sister, 
as chief mourner, being led by the Earl of Surrey 
and the Earl of Essex, and followed by a long train 
of persons of distinction, then entered the chapel, 
and took her station at the head of the corpse. 
Mass having been said, and the usual offerings 
made, the procession returned, leaving only certain 
Ladies, Grooms, and Officers of Arms to watch by 
the body. This ceremony was daily repeated during 
the ten days which the corpse remained in the 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. XC1X 

Tower. On the twelfth day after her Majesty's 
demise, Wednesday, February the 22nd, mass was 
said early in the morning, and soon afterwards the 
coffin was placed on a chair or car, covered with 
black velvet, and drawn by six horses. An effigy 
of the Queen, dressed in the royal robes, with a 
sceptre in the hand and a crown on the head, was 
carried on a kind of stage, at each corner of which 
a Gentleman Usher knelt. Banners of Our Lady, 
of the Salutation, of the Assumption, and of the 
Nativity l , which, to signify that the deceased died 
in child-bed, were painted on a white ground, were 
borne near the car by Knights and Esquires. 
Eight Ladies of Honour, mounted on palfreys, sad- 
dled and trapped with black velvet, followed the 
corpse. Citizens on horseback, and servants of 
the King and nobility, closed the procession, which 
was joined by the Earl of Derby, Lord High Con- 
stable, the Lord Mayor, the Queen's Chamberlain, 
several Peers, the Judges, Prelates, and Abbots, 
Knights of the Garter, &c. The streets were lined 
with persons bearing torches, and in Fenchurch- 
street and Cheapside stood thirty-seven 9 virgins, 
a number corresponding with the Queen's age, 
dressed in white, wearing chaplets of white and 
green, and each holding a lighted taper. Com- 
panies of foreign merchants, French, Spaniards, and 
Venetians, holding tapers, with the arms of their 

1 MS. in the College of Arms. 

* MS. in the College of Arms says there were three hundred. 

o 2 



MEMOIR OF 



respective nations, were also present. In this order 
the procession arrived at the Churchyard of St. 
Margaret, Westminster, when the Marquis of Dor- 
set, and the Earls, "took their mantles." The 
corpse was received by various Prelates and Abbots, 
bearing censers and holy water, and being duly 
censed was removed from the car and conveyed to 
the hearse, when the usual service was performed ; 
after which the Peers and Peeresses, &c. retired to 
the Queen's Great Chamber to supper. During 
the night Ladies, Esquires, and Officers of Arms 
watched by the body. 

Early the next morning, Thursday the 23rd of 
February, Lady Courtenay, as chief mourner, and 
other personages, attended mass, and having retired 
for a short time to refresh themselves, they returned 
to the Church, when other masses were said and 
offerings made. The late Queen's Ladies offered 
thirty-seven palls, first kissing and then laying them 
on the body ; of this number five were presented by 
each of her Majesty's sisters, all of whom, it may 
be inferred, attended the funeral. A sermon was 
preached by Fitzjames, Bishop of Rochester, from 
the text " Misere mei misere mei saltern vos amici 
mei quia manus Domini tetigit me ;" " which words 
he spake in the name of England, and the lovers 
and friends of the same, seeing the great loss of 
that virtuous Queen, and that noble Prince, and the 
Archbishop of Canterbury." At the conclusion of 
the sermon another mass was said, when the palls 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. 



were removed from the coffin, and the Ladies quitted 
the church. The Queen's effigy was then placed 
in St. Edward's shrine, and the Prelates, with the 
King's Chaplains, approached the hearse. The 
grave was opened, and hallowed by the Bishop of 
London, and, after various prayers and ceremonies, 
the body was committed to the grave prepared for it. 

Elizabeth of York's " reason," or " word," as it 
was termed, was " Humble and Reverence." 

The Privy Purse Expenses of the Queen from 
March, 1502, to her death in February, 1503, con- 
sist chiefly of payments for the following purposes : 
Rewards or gratuities to persons for bringing her 
presents, and the donation, though generally pro- 
portionate to the article given, was sometimes of 
greater value. Nothing was too contemptible to 
be received, nor was any person deemed too hum- 
ble to be permitted to testify his respect in this 
manner. The custom of making presents was pro- 
bably very ancient, and was continued as late as 
the reign of Henry the Eighth *. Among the articles 
presented to Elizabeth of York were fish, fruit, 
fowls, puddings, tripe, a crane, woodcocks, a po- 
pinjay, quails, and other birds, pork, rabbits, Lan- 
thony cheeses, pease cods, cakes, a wild boar, 
malmsey wine, flowers, chiefly roses, bucks, sweet- 
meats, rose water, a cushion, and a pair of clary- 
cords, a kind of virginal. 

1 See the Privy Purse Expenses of that Monarch from 1529 to 
1532. 8vo. 1827. 



cil MEMOIR OF 

The disbursements were for servants' wages ; for 
preparing apartments for her Majesty when she re- 
moved from one place to another ; for conveying her 
clothes and necessary furniture ; for messengers ; for 
the repairs of her barge and the pay of the barge- 
men ; for her chairs and litters ; for the purchase of 
household articles ; for silks, satins, damask, cloth 
of gold, velvet, linen, gowns, kirtles, petticoats, 
for her own use, or the use of the ladies whom she 
maintained ; for jewellery, trappings for horses, 
furs, gold chains, &c. ; for the charges of her stable 
and greyhounds ; for the salaries of her ladies ; for 
annuities to her sisters, and the entire support of 
the children of Katherine Lady Courtenay ; for the 
clothing and board of her Fool ; for her numerous 
offerings, and other demands for religious purposes, 
principally in sending persons on pilgrimages in 
her name; for the distribution of alms on her 
journeys ; for the maintenance of her daughter the 
Queen of Scots, for whose use clothes and musical 
instruments were repeatedly purchased ; for re- 
pairs of Baynard's Castle ; for gifts at christenings; 
for setting anthems and carols at 'Christmas; for 
making bonfires ; for gratuities to old servants, to 
the King's painter, and to others who had done 
anything acceptable to her ; for minstrels ; for the 
support of children which were presented to her ; 
for the trifling losses she incurred at cards, dice, and 
the tables ; for boat hire ; for the attendance of 
physicians and apothecaries, and for medicine ; for 



ELIZABETH OF YORK. Clll 

% 

the wages of priests, and for making nuns and a 
monk, &c. 

Her Majesty's revenue was inadequate to all 
these demands, and she was not unfrequently obliged 
to borrow money, pledging her plate as security 
for its repayment. The King sometimes relieved 
her necessities, but the same security was given ; 
and her pecuniary difficulties are apparent from 
her being obliged, in most cases, to pay her trades- 
men part of their bills only, instead of discharging 
the whole amount. Entries occur of small sums 
lent to the Queen by her attendants, but these 
probably arose from her not carrying money about 
her person, and desiring the lady in waiting to 
purchase some object which attracted her notice, 
or to gratify a spontaneous feeling of benevolence. 

The total amount expended in the year to which 
these accounts relate is 3,41 1/. 5*. 9^., and the re- 
ceipts in the same period were 3,585/. 19s. 10d, 
so that her debts were not increased in that year. 

Of the low value of money at the period many 
striking examples occur. The highest salary of the 
Queen's ladies was 33/. 6s. 8d., and the lowest 5/. 
For the support of her two nephews and niece, 
two female servants and a groom, only 13s. 4d. a 
week were allowed. Ten pence a day were the 
daily costs of a priest whilst on a pilgrimage for the 
Queen; and two shillings a month were the board 
wages of the Fool. The Master of her barge re- 
ceived Is. 4d. a day, and the rowers 8<f. A mes- 



CIV MEMOIR OF ELIZABETH OF YORK. 

senger for going from Greenwich to London was paid 
no more than 6d. : the expense of keeping a child, 
which had been given to her Majesty, was 16s. ayear. 
The breakfast of one of the Ladies of the Court cost 
9d. ; the hire of a boat from Greenwich to London 
was 4d., and from London to Westminster 2d., but 
small as the sum is, it is greater than might be ex- 
pected, and the boat was perhaps rowed by two or 
more men. A surgeon's fee for going from London 
to Richmond to visit the Queen was 13*. 4d. Work- 
men and labourers' wages appear to have been 6d. 
a day. Her embroiderer was allowed 21. a year 
for his house rent, and Is. 4d. a week board wages ; 
whilst women embroiderers were paid 3s. a week, 
which included their board wages. A pair of shoes 
for the Fool, and for footmen, cost 6d. each ; and a 
pair for the Queen, single-soled, with laton buckles, 
Is., but a pair of buskins for her use cost 4s. The 
charges of a girl taking the veil were 61. 13s. 4rf. ; 
sixteen-pence a week was the allowance for board- 
ing one of her Majesty's gentlewomen who was ill. 
Fifty-two barrels of beer, which were given to the 
Friars Observants of Greenwich, cost 61. 18s. Sd., or 
2s. Sd. a barrel : the hire of a horse, to carry a 
female servant from Easthampstead to London, was 
Is. 4dL ; and the wages of the grooms of the chamber 
were Is., and of the pages Sd. a day. 



THIES AR THE PAYEMENTES MADE BY 
RICHARD DECOUS FROM THE XXIIIJ" 
DAY OF MARCHE, ANNO XVIJ"" UNTO 



FURST the same xxiiij" day of Marche de- 
livered to Maister Richard Payn Aul- 
moigner to the Queue for xxxvij u pore 
women every woman iij s. j d. for hir 
maunday upon Shire Thursday . Cxiiij s. j d. 

Itm for thoffring of the Quene upon Good 

Fryday . . . Ixvj s. viij d. 

Itih the same day to Nicholas Maior Sadler 
to the Quene in parte of payement of 
suche money as to him is due for making 
of certain stuf of his occupacion ayenst 
the mariage of the Prince . . x li. 

Itm for thoffringes of the Quene upon Ester 
day in the morning to the Crosse v s. at 
highmasse v s. at hir housell xx d. and 
upon Monday Tuesday and Wednesday 
in Ester weke xv s. . . xxvj s. viij d. 

Itin delivered to the Quene upon Ester day 
for hir offering to the Coffre for hir par- 
don . Ixvj s. viij d. 

Itni the xxviij u day of Marche to thancho- 
rasse of Saint Petre at Saint Albons in 
aulmouse . . j "U d - 

B 



2 MARCH, 1502. 

Itin the same day to the Quenes purse at 

Richemont . . . xx s. 

I tin the same day to Robert Fayrfax for set- 
ting an Anthem of oure lady and Saint 
Elizabeth . . xx s. 

Itin delivered to thofficers of the kechyn in 
rewarde at Ester Ixvj s. viij d. to the 
porters of the gate x s. to the Saulcery 
x s. and to the Squillery x s. Sm a iiij li. xvj s. \iij d. 

Itin delivered to John Goose my lord of 
Yorkes fole in rewarde for bringing a 
Carppe to the Quene . . xij d. 

Itin to Robert Aleyn for a rewarde by him 
geven to the doughtier of the keper of 
the Kinges place at Westm r for bringing 
a present of almond butter to the Quene 
to Hampton Courte .. . iij s. iiij d. 

I tin to a Mynstrell that played upon a droon 
before the Quene at Richemount in re- 
warde . . . iij s. iiij d. 

Itin to a servaunt of my lady Nevile wif to 
S r Thomas Darcy, in rewarde for bring- 
ing a present of Sele to the Quene to 
Richemount . ' ;..;.' . x s. 

ELYSABETH. 

r Sin a pag. xxxj li. xj s. ix d. 



MARCH, 1502. 3 

I tin delivered to S r William Barton preest for 
thofferinges of the Queue to oure lady 
and Saint George at Wyndesoure and to 
the Holy Crosse there ij s. vj d. to King 
Henry ij s. vj d. to oure lady of Eton 
xx d. to the Childe of grace at Reding 
ij s. vj d. to oure lady of Caversham 
ij s. vj d. to oure lady of Cokthorp xx d. 
to the holy blode of Heyles xx d. to 
Prince Edward vs. to oure lady of 
Worcestre v s. to the Holy Rood at 
Northampton v s. to oure lady of Grace 
there ij s. vj d. to oure lady of Walsing- 
ham vj s. viij d. to oure lady of Sudbury 
ij s. vj d. to oure lady of Wolpitte xx d. 
to oure lady of Ippeswiche iij s. iiij d. 
and to oure lady of Stokeclare xx d. Sm a xlviij s. iiij d. 

Itni to the same S r William Barton for his 
costes going the said pilgremages for the 
Quene by the space of xxvij dayes at 
x d. the day . . xxij s. vj d. 

Item to Richard Mylner of Bynfeld for money 
to bee offred for the Quene to our lady 
of Crowham ij s. vj d. To the roode of 
Grace in Kent xx d. to Saint Thomas 
of Canterbury, v s. to oure lady of 
undrecroft there v s. to Sainct Adrean 
xx d. to Saint Augustyn xx d. to oure 
lady of Dover xx d. to the roode of the 
north dore in Poules xx d. to our lady of 
Grace there xx d to Saint Ignasi xx d. 
To Saint Dominik xx d. To Saint 
Petre of Melayn xij d. to Saint Fraunces 
B 2 



4 MARCH, 1502. 

xx d. to Saint Savioure ij s. vj d. to 
oure lady of Piewe ij s. vj d. to cure 
lady of Berking ij s. vj d. and to our 
lady of Willesdone ij s. vj d. Sm a xxxviij s, vj d. 

Item to the same Richard Milner for his costes 
going the said pilgremages for the Quene 
by the space of xiij dayes at x d. the day x s. x d. 

Item to John Walker yeoman aulmoigner for 
money by him paid for a cowle for Water 
xij d. for iij newe bolles xij d. for a 
basket iiij d. for flowres iiij d. for heting 
of watier at the kechin xij d. and for 
cariage of the same stuff from London 
to Richemount iiij d. for the Quenes 
Maundy upon Shirthursday . iiij s. 

Item the xxix u day of Marche delivered to a 
servaunt of the prothonotarye of Spayn a 
reward for bringing a present of Oranges 
to the Quene to Richemount 

ELYSABETH. 

r SnYpag. vj u vj s. ij d. 



Item the same day to a pore man that brought 
a present of Oranges and Apples to the 
Quene at Richemount . . x ii d. 

Item the last day of Marche to William Pas- 
tone page of the Quenes beddes in re- 
warde towardes the byeng of his wed- 
ding clothing . W1(r; . xis. 

Item the same day to Thomas Shurley and 
Edmond Burtone yeoman of the Quenes 



APRIL, 1502. 5 

chambre for theire costes riding upon a 
message of the Queues with maistres 
Alionore Johns by the space of ij dayes 
eithere of theim at xij d. the day iiij s. 
Itin for money by theim payed for the 
cariage of certain stuf of the Quenes 
x d. and for the dyner and botehire of 
the said Maistres Alianor upon Shire- 
thursday ij s. viij d. . . v ij s. vj d. 

Item the same day to a pore woman that 
brought a present of Butter and Chekins 
to the Quene . . . viij d. 

Item the iiij' h day of Aprelle to M. Richard 
Payn aulmoigner to the Quene for money 
by him dault in aulmouse upon Good- 
fryday . . . xxj s. viij d. 

Item the same daye to Henry Bryan of Lon- 
don mercer in partie of payement of a 
bille conteignyng the somme of an hun- 
dred and seven poundes x s. q* to him 
due for certain silkes and othere stuf of 
his occupation deliverd to th'use of the 
Quene as by the same bille signed with 
thande of hir grace it appereth . xxxij li. vj s. 

Item the same daye to John Duffy n grome of 
the chambre with the Quene for his 
costes riding by the commaundement of 
the Quene to the duchesse of Norffolk to 
warne hir to receyve the wif of Edmond 
de la Pole late Erie of Suff. . ij s. 

Item the vj tt day of Aprille to the Quenes 
purse at Grenewiche by thandes of 
maistres Lee . . xx s. 

Item the daye aforesaid to William Worthy 



6 APRIL, 1502. 

otherwise called Phip for the bourde of 
William the Quenes fole for the moneth 
of Marche . . ij s. 

Item the vj* day of Aprille to Robert Bailly 
and Thomas ap Howell late servauntes 
to the Lord William Courteney towardes 
there costs going into the west countrey 
to Therl of Devon . . vj s. viij d. 

Item the same daye to a servaunt of William 
Bulstrode in reward for bringing a pre- 
sent of Wardyns to the Quene to Grene- 
wiche . . xij d. 

ELYSABETH. 

j> r Sm a pag. xxxvij li. viij s. vj d. 



Itin the same day to William Crowmer gen- 
tilman husshere for money by him deli- 
vered to the Quene for hire offring to the 
high aultier at Richemount upon Estre 
day after high masse in going hire stacons iij s. iiij d. 

Itin the viij* day of Aprelle to Lewys Wai- 
tier bargeman for conveyeng the Quenes 
grace from Richemount to Grenewiche 
the ij de day of Aprille in hire barge with 
xxj rowers every rower taking viij d. 
xiiij s. the maister xvj d. and the reward 
of a barge beneth the brigge xvj d. Itin 
a grete bote and v rowers the iiij* day of 
Aprille conveyeng Maistres Brent from 
Hampton courte to London by the 
space of two dayes every rower at viij d. 



APRIL, 1502. .; 

the day vj s. viij d. the raaister ij dayes 
ij s. viij d. and the rewarde of the same 
bote ij s. . . . xxviij s. 

Itin the X th day of Aprille to the Quenes purs 

at Grenewiche . . . xl s. 

Itm the same daye to Edmond Burtone for 
money by him geven in reward by the 
Quenes commaundement to the keper 
of the litle gardyn at Windesour . vj s. viij d. 

Itm the XIX th day of Aprille to Richard Jus- 
tice page of the robys for his costes 
going from Richemount to London to my 
lord the Quenes chambrelain xij d. Itm 
for a reward geven to men that drewe 
the Quenes barge at hir going to Hamp- 
ton courte viij d. Itm payed for the 
hemmyng of a kertelle of the Quenes 
of damaske iiij d. Itm for his costes 
being behinde at Richemount with stuf 
of the Quenes by space of iij dayes at 
viij d. the day ij s. Itin for mendyng of 
a crymsyn velvet gowne iiij d. Itm for 
mending of a gowne of blake velvet 
iiij d. Itm for going from Grenewiche to 
London for a stole of the Quenes vj d. 
and for going from Grenewiche to Lon- 
don for Lybert the goldsmyth vj d. v s. viij d. 

Itin to the fraternitee of Saint George in 

South werke . . .vs. 

Item the xxiij* day of Aprille to Evan Petre- 
son joynour, for the stuff and making of 
iiij working stoles for the Quene and 
delivered to thandes of Nicholas Grey 
price the stole xvj d. Sm a . .vs. iiij d. 



8 APRIL, 1502. 

Item the xxviij" day of Aprille delivered to 
my lady Veraey for money by hire lent 
to the Quene ^ . xx s. 

ELYSABETH. 

{> r Sm a pag. v. li. xiiij s. 



Item the xxix a day of Aprelle to John Grice 
Appoticary for certain stuf of his occu- 
pacon by him delivered to the Quenes 
use as by a bille signed with thand of 
hir grace it appereth . ix li. xiij s. iiij d. 

Itin the same day to Fryer Hercules for a 
pounde and a half of gold of Venys at 
xxx s. the pounde xlv s. eight unces of 
gold of Dammaske at iiij s. viij d. the 
unce xxxvij s. iiij d. and for an unce of 
silke of Venice xx d. employed aboutes 
the making of a lace and botons for the 
Kinges mantell of the Garter. Itin for 
making of the same lase and botons 
xvj s. . . C s. 

Itin the furst day of May to Thabbasse of 
the Minoresse for sending a present of 
watier of rooses to the Quene to the 
Towre . . . vj s. viij d. 

Itin to Dampe Kateryne and Dampe Eliza- 
beth nonnes of the Minores in aulmouse 
vj s. viij d. and to an olde woman ser- 
vaunt to Thabbesse ther xij d. and to 
a doughter of William Cromer also a 
nonne there iij s. iiijd. v!*i.' j -*t ' xj s. 



MAY, 1502. 9 

I tm the same day to the fraternitie of Corpus 
Xpi founded within the churche paro- 
chiall of Saint Sepulcre in Londone . v s. 

Itin the seconde day of May to William Bo- 
tery for a yerd quart' dl quart' of blake 
tynselle saten of the riche making for an 
edge of a gowne of blake velvet for the 
Quene at xxxiij s. iiij d. the yerd xlv s. 
x d. Ttin a yerd quarter dl quarter of 
blake saten for an edge of a gowne of 
crymsyn velvet at viij s. the yerd xj s. 
Itin seven yerdes of grene satten of 
Bruges for a kertell for my Lady Anne 
at ij s. viij d. the yerd xviij s. viij d. Itin 
for xij yardes sarcenet of eight divers 
colours for girdelles for the Quene at 
iiij s. the yerd xlviij s. Itm iiij yerdes 
dl of sarcenet of tawny grene and russet 
at xxij d. the yerd viij s. iij d. . vj li. xj s. ix d. 

Itin the iij de day of May to the Quenes purse 

by thandes of Henry Pole at Grenewiche x s. 

Itin to John Williams Thomas Nelmes Hugh 
Dolbyn Edward Davy and John Fitz- 
williams to every of theim iij s. iiij d. 
in reward for gevyng attendance at the 
house of the duchesse of Suff' at Steben- 
hith . *vjs. viijd. 

ELYSABETH. 

j>< Sih a pag. xxiij li. xiiij s. v d. 



10 MAY, 1502. 

Itin to Windesore for money by him geven to 
a servaunt of S r John Mortymer by the 
commaundement of the Quene v s. and 
to a Frencheman that brought a present 
of pepyns to the Quene to the Tower 
iij s. iiij d. , ,.; . -. viij s. iiij d. 

Itin to Nicholas Maior the Quenes sadler in 
partie of payement of suche money as 
to him is due for making of certain stuf 
of his occupacon ayenst the mariage of 
the Princesse . . xx h. 

Itin the v* day of May to Thomas Goodriche 
and Thomas Awdeley of London mer- 
cers for certain velvettes and othere stuf 
of theire occupacon by theim delivered 
to th'use of the Quene as by a bill signed 
with hire hande it appereth r . xl ti. xiij s. v d. 

Itin the same daye to my Lady Bray for a 
rewarde by hire geven to oon William 
Shadde for bringing a present of pud- 
dinges to the Quene ,_ . . iij s. iiij d. 

Itin for thoffring of the Quene upon the Fest 
of Thascencon of oure Lord at Grene- 
wiche . . .vs. 

Itin the same day to the Quene of Scottes by 
the commaundement of the Quenes 
grace . . . . . xij d. 

Itin the vij" 1 day of May to Henry Roper 
page of the bedds for his costes going by 
the commaundement of the Quene from 
Grenewiche to Londone for John Libert 
the xvj tt day of Aprille iiij d. Itin the 
xvij" 1 day of the same moneth for going 
from Grenewiche to Westminster for the 



MAY, 1502. 1 1 

Quenes confessour iiij d. Itin the xix th 
day of the same moneth for going from 
Grenewiche to London upon divers mes- 
sages of the Quenes and there being 
twoo dayes at viij d. the day xvj d. And 
for foure baskettes with covers and foure 
lokkes bought for the Queue iiij s. . vj s. 

Itin the viij* day of May to the Quenes purse 

by thandes of maistres Lee . xx li. 

Itin the x tb day of May to John Browne 
grome of the beddes for his costes being 
behinde at Richemount with stuf of the 
Quenes at hir departing from thens by 
the space of twoo dayes at x d. the day 
xx d. and for his costes going from the 
Tower of London to Richemount to 
prepayre the Quenes lodging there 
against the commyng theder of thambas- 
sadours of Hungre and there being vj 
dayes v s. and for his costes going from 
Grenewiche to London ij d. . vj s. x d. 

ELYSABETH. 

' Sm 8 pag. Ixxxij li. iij s. xj d. 



Itin the same day to James Noteras for his 
costes riding by the commaundement of 
the Quene from London to Havering at 
Bower for maistres Saxilby xl j d - 

Itin the xij* day of May to Mawde Hamond 
for keping of hire child geven to the 
Quene for half a yere ended at Estre last 

viij 8. 
past 

C2 



12 MAY, 1502. 

I tin the same day to Edmond Burton and 
Nicholas Wyberne for theire costes going 
from Richemount to Hampton Court 
for maistres Brent by the space of twoo 
dayes at xij d. the day iiij s. Itin payed 
for the brekefast of maistres Lee at 
Richemont ix d. Itin for the hire of a 
bote from Grenewiche to London iiij d. 
and from thens to Westminster ij d. ob. v s. iij d. oB. 

Itin the xiij* day of May to Agnes Meting- 
ham in aulmous by the commaundement 
of the Queue . . vj s. viij d. 

Itin the same day to my Lady Mary for hir 

Ire of pardon of the Jubilee . xij d. 

Itin the xiiij* 11 day of May to the Quenes 

purs at Green wiche . . xl s. 

Itin delivered to William Bulstrode for the 
contentacon of certain sommes of money 
by him borowed of divers personnes in 
London for th'use of the Quenes grace 
whichehad certain plate in plegge. CCvj ti. xiij s. iiij d. 

Itin to S r William Capell knight for money 

by him lent to the Quenes grace . C li. 

Itin to William Stafford for money by him 

borowed for the Quenes grace . C li. 

Itin for thoffring of the Quene upon the Fest 

of Pentecoste and the iij dayes following xx s. 

Itin the xviij* day of May to the Quenes 
purs by thandes of maistres Alianor 
Johns at Grenewich . -. - 4 . xl s. 

Itin the same day to maistres Cromer in re- 

warde at her departing from the Courte xl s. 

Itin the same day to my lady Cecill for money 

by hir lent to the Quene . . . Ixxiij s. iiij d. 



MAY, 1502. ] 3 

Itin the xxj" day of May to oon John Decon- 
son servaunt to the Prioure of Hechyn 
in reward for bringing a present of 
apples and a quysshyn to the Quene . xiij s. iiij d. 

Itin the same day to maistres Belknap for 

money by hirlent to the Quenes grace xx s. 

ELYSABETH. 
f r Sm a pag. CCCClxxli. xxiij d. ofc. 

Itin for thoffring of the Quene upon the Fest 

of the Trinitee at Richemount . v s. 

Itin the xxiij" day of May to Robynet en- 

browdrer in reward . . xiij s. iiij d. 

I tin the same day to the Quenes purs by 
thandes of maistres Alionor Jotins at 
Richmont . . xx s. 

Itin the xxiiij" day of May to Stephene 
Higham for certain stuff by him made 
for the Quene x s. Itin for money by 
him payed for the botehire of the Lady 
Lovel from Richemount to Grenewiche 
ij s. iiij d. and for going from Riche- 
mount to London to Doctour Lathis 
xij d. . . . . xiij S. iiij d. 

Itin the same daye to a servaunt of Thabbase 
of Syon in reward for bringing a present 
of Rabettes and quayles to the Quene 
to Richemount . . ij s. 

Itin the XXV th day of May to Edmond Cal- 
verd page of the Quenes chambre for 
his costes going by the commaundement 
of the Quene from Richemount to Lon- 



14 MAY, 1502. 

don to William Stafford for divers stuf 
for the King in the nyght ij s. Itin for 
going from Grenewich to London for 
Maister Lynche xij d. Itin for going 
from Richemount to London to maistres 
Lokke for bonnettes for the Quene viij d. 
Itin for going from Grenewiche to Lou- 
don for maistres Stafford and maistres 
Lees vj d. Itin for money by him payed 
for egges butter and milke for the King 
and Quene iij s. vj d. and for riding from 
Grenewiche to Croydon to the Princesse 
viij d. ... viij s. iiij d. 

Itin the same day to Frary Clerc of Saint 
Jonns for the buryeng of the men that 
were hanged at Wapping mylne .'-. . viij s. 

Itin the same day to Nicholas Maior sadler 
to the Quene for making of six tapettes 
for the sompter horses with the lynyng 
grayling jagging and for worsted yerne 
at xvj d. the pece ) 3? . . viij s. 

Itm for thoffring of the Quene upon the 

Feest of Corpus Xpi at Richemount . v s. 

Itin the same day to a servaunt of tharche- 
bisshop of Canterbury in reward for 
bringing a present of a Lanthony Cheese 
to the Quene to Richemount -7. ij s. 

Itin the xxviij u day of M ay to John Johnson 
surgion in reward for his costes commyng 
from London to the Quene to Riche- 
mount . . <". ' xiij s. iiij d. 

ELYSABETH. 

3?* Sin 3 pag. iiij li. xviij s. iiij d. 



MAY, 1502. J 

Itm the same day to maistres Alianor Jofins 
for money by hir geven in reward to a 
servaunt of the Lady Lovell for bringing 
a chest of iverey with the passion of oure 
Lord theron . . H j ~ p j- d 

Itm to John Browne for money by him payed 

for pepyns for the Quene . . ij s. vj d. 

Itm to John Hertley for the amending of five 

barehides of the warderobe of the beddes x s. 

Itm the xxix" day of May to Lewes Waltier 
for conveyeng the Quene in hir barge 
with xxj rowers from Grenewiche to the 
Tower the xxvij" day of April every 
rower taking viij d. xiiij s. the maister 
xvj d. Itin the ij de day of May convey- 
eng the Quene from the Tower to Grene- 
wiche with xxj rowers xiiij s. and the 
maister xvj d. Itm the xix* day of May 
conveyeng the Quene from Grenewiche 
to Richemount with xxj u rowers at viij d. 
the rower xiiij s. and the maister xvj d. 
Itm a grete bote the same day convey- 
eng the ladyes and gentilwomen from 
Grenewiche to Richemount with ix 
rowers at viij d. the rower vj s. and the 
maister xvj d. . . liij s. iiij d. 

Itin the same day to the said Lewes for 
talowing dressing and for roopes and 
othere necessaries for the Quenes barge x s. 

Itin the same day to Richard Justice for 
money by him payed for a yerd and an 
half of tawny saten for the Quene at 
vij s. the yerd x s. vj d. Itin for a yerd 



16 MAY, 1502. 

and an half of blake saten at vij s. the 
yerd x s. vj d. Item for a yerde and a 
half of crymsyn sarcenet at iij s. viij d. 
the yerd v s. vj d. Itfn for his costes 
going from Grenewiche to the Tower for 
a stole covered with scarlet viij d. Itin 
for going for a gowne of russet velvet 
with a purfle of cloth of gold of damaske 
viij d. Itin for going for silkes above 
written j d. Itin for going for a gowne 
of purple velvet with a purfle of cloth of 
gold viij d. Itin for ij yerdes of white 
fustyam for sokkes for the Quene xiij d. 
and for his costes lyeng behinde at 
Grenewiche with the Queues stuf by the 
space of ij dayes xvj d. . . xxxj s. 

Itin the same day to the wif of oone William 
Greneweye in reward for bringing a pre- 
sent of peesecoddes to the Quene ij s. 

ELYSABETH. 

.p 1 Sm a pag. Cxij s. ij d. 



Itm the same day to John Hertley for the 
amending of the barehide belonging to 
the close carre of the wardrobe of the 
robys . . '^ . vs. 

Itin the xxx u day of May to John Hensted 
of London wexchaundeler for twoo rollys 
of white wex weyeng ij Ib. at viij d. 



MAY, 1502. 17 

the Ib. ij s. viij d. Itm ten rolls yelow wex 
at viij d. the Ib. vj s. viij d. delivered the 
vij* day of Decembre Itm the iij^ day 
of Aprille delivered foure rollys white 
wex vs. iiij d. and for ten rolles of 
yelowe wex vj s. viij d. . . xxj s. iiij d. 

Itm the same daye to John Stormy of Charte- 
sey in reward for keping of twoo pal- 
frayes of the Quenes after the decease of 
Richard Payne palfreyman . x s. 

Itm the same daye to Elys Hilton grome of 
the robys for money by him payed by the 
commaundement of the Quene for cer- 
tain stuf for the Lord William Courteney. 
Furst for ten elnes of Holand cloth for 
shirtes at ij s the elne xx s. Itin a furre 
and a half of fox for a gowne of russet 
xij s. Itm for making of the same 
gowne xj d. Itin for a nyght bonet xij d. 
Itm for twoo yerdes iij quarters of saten 
of Bruges blake for the covering of a 
sadelle for my Lady Kateryne at ij s. 
vj d. the yerd vj s. x d. ob. Itin for a 
yerde and a quarter of blake velvet for 
bordering of the said sadelle and for 
the perfourmyng of a horse barneys 
at x s. the yerd xij s. vj d. Itin for 
cariage of divers gownes of the Quenes 
from the Towre to Richemount xviij d. 
and for cariage of the same gownes 
from Grenewiche to the Towre iiij d. 
Sm- . . !* Ud-**' 

Itin the same day to the Quenes purs by 

D 



18 JUNE, 1502. 

thandes of George Hamerton at Riche- 

mount . . xx s. 

Ttm the furst day of Juyn to Thomas 
Acworth for thexpenses of the Queues 
stable ' . . Iviij li. v s. iij d. 

Itin the ij^ day of Juyn to a servaunt of the 
Prioure of Lanthony in reward for bring- 
ing a present of cheses to the Quene . vs. 

Itin the iij de day of Juyn to a servaunt of 
Richard Smyth in reward for bringing a 
fawne from the parke of Swalofield to 
the Quene to Richemount . . iij s. iiij d. 

ELYSABETH. 

j> r Sm a pag. Ixiij li. v s. j d. ob. 



Itin the iiij* day of Juyn to the Quenes 
purse at Richemount by thandes of 
Maistres Alianor Johnes and John 
Browne . . xx s. 

Itin the \j A day of Juyn to my Lady Bray for 

money by hire lent to the Quene . xxvj s. viij d. 

Itin the vj* day of Juyn to Nicholas Grey 
clerc of the werkes at Richemount in 
reward to him geven by the Quene 
towardes suche losses as he susteigned at 
the birnyug of his howse at Riche- 
mount . . lx s. 

Itin the vij* day of Juyn to the Quenes purse 

at Westin by thandes of Maistres Brent xl s. 



JUNE, 1502. 19 

Itin the viij* day of Juyn to Henry Roper 
for stuf by him bought for the Quene 
of Scottes. Furst for thre basons of 
peauter weyeng viij Ib. dl price the Ib. 
vj d. iiij s. iij d. Itin a chafer of brasse 
weyeng xviij Ib. price the Ib. iij d. iiij s. 
vj d. I tin twoo wasshing bolles xiiij d. 
Itin a fyre panne xij d. Itin a grete 
trussing basket vj d. Itin a payre 
belowes ij d. and for cariage of the same 
by water from London to Westin 
iij d. Sm a . . . xj s. x d. 

Itin the ix to day of Juyn to the dean of the 
chapelle for thoffringes of the Quene 
upon the Feest of Sainct George Sainct 
Marc Philip and Jacob and the Inven- 
con of the holy crosse . . xx s. 

Itin delivered to Henry Bryan of London 
mercer for eight yerdes of blake dam- 
maske for a cloke for the Quene at vij s. 
iiij d. the yerd Iviij s. viij d. Itin for 
fyve yerdes of blake sarcenet for lynyng 
to the same cloke at iiij s. the yerde xx s. 
Itm for a yerde and iij quarters of blake 
velvet for the bordring of the same at x s. 
the yerd xvij s. vj d. Sin" iiij . *vj s. ij d. 

Itm delivered to the same Henry Bryan in 
party of payement of a bille signed with 
thande of the Quene conteignyng the 
somme of Cvij ti. x s. q d . to him due 
for certain silkes and othere stuf of his 
occupacon by him delivered to th'use of 
the Quene as by the same bill it ap- 

pereth 

D 2 



20 JUNE, 1502. 

Itm delivered to the Quenes purse by thandes 

of Cristofre Askue at Richemount . xl li. 

ELYSABETH. 

p r Sin" pag. Ixiij li. xiiij s. viij d. 



Itm the X th day of Juyn to Robert Hed of 
Londone tailloure for making of twoo 
cootes of blake chamlet for my yong 
Lordes Henry Courtney and Edward 
Courtney at ij s. the coote iiij s. ayenst 
Cristmas anno xvj mo . Itm for making 
of twoo cootes of blake velvet for the 
same yong lordes ayenst Estre than 
next ensuyng iiij s. deliverd by Wil- 
liam Bailly. Itm for making of twoo 
cootes of blake chamlet the same tyme 
for the said lordes deliverd by Elys 
Hiltone iiij s. . . xij s. 

Itm to the smyth at Baynardes Castell for 
making of ij lokkes boltes for the gar- 
deyn dore ther weyeng ix Ib. at 
ij d. oB the Ifo. xiij d. oB. I tin for 
a lokke and a staple for the same 
dore xij d. Itm iij boltes to the hall dores 
there xij d. for ij lokkes to the same 
dores xx d. Itm for a lok to a dore 
at the stayre fote xij d. Itm for a bolte 
for gardyn dore and mending of twoo 



JUNE, 1502. 21 

lokkes viij d. Itm for mending of ij 
payre henges vj d. ob. . . v ij s. 

Itm the xj* day of Juyn to the Quenes purs 
by thandes of my Lady Anne Percy at 
Westin 

* A A o 

Itm the same daye to William Antyne coper 
smyth for spangelles settes square peces 
sterrys dropes and pointes after silver and 
gold for garnisshing of jakettes against 
the disguysing . . l v j s. viij d. 

Itm the xij* day of Juyn to my Lady Bray 
for money by hire deliverd to the frater- 
nitie of oure Lady of Roundsevale ij s. 
iiij d. and to the daughters of Henry 
Wyndeslowe in reward for bringing a 
present of roses to the Quene at Westin 
vj s. viij d. Itm to a servaunt of my 
Lorde of Derby for bringing a pre- 
sent of malvesey to the Quene iij s. 
iiij d. ... xiij s. iiij d. 

Itin the xiij" 1 day of Juyn to John Staunton 

theldre towardes the byeng of a hors . vj s. viij d. 
Itm the same day to Hampnet Clegge for 
mone by him deliverd to the Quene 
for hir offring to Saint Edward at 
Westm . . . vj s. viij d. 

Itin the xiiij 111 day of Juyn to ij Friers of the 
monasterie of Saint Kateryne Mount in 
Senay for a Ire of pardon of the said 
monasterie . xiij s. iiij d. 

Itm the same day to the Quenes purs at 
Richemount by thandes of Maistres 
Alianor Jofins . . . xx s. 

Itm to John Hamerton for money by him 



22 JUNE, 1502. 

delivered to the Quene for hire offring at 
hire departing from Westfn to oure 
Lady of Pie we and to Bowe . vij s. ix d. 

ELYSABETH. 

,* Sin" pag. viij li. iij s. v d. 



I tin the same day to Thomas Foller of Lon- 
don mercer for yj yerdes of blake velvet 
for a gowne for the Quene delivered the 
vij" 1 day of Juyn at ix s. viij d. the yerd 
Ixij s. x d. Itm for a yerd of blake 
bokeram for the same gowne viij d. Itin 
for a yerd and a quarter of sarcenet 
orange colour at iiij s. iiij d. the yerd 
v s. v d. . . . Ixviij s. xj d. 

Itm the same day to Robert Ragdale for 
making of a peticote of scarlet for the 
Quene viij d. Itin for making of lynon 
peticotes for the Quene xij d. Itin for 
making of vj payere shetes to the Queues 
warderobe of her robes xv d. Itin for 
upper bodyeng sieving and lynyng of a 
gowne of blake velvet for the Quene of 
Scottes xx d. Itin for canvas to the 
same iij d. Itin for making of a gowne 
of blake sateyn for my lady Mary xx d. 
Itm for hemmyng of a kirtelle of the 
Quene of Scottes iij d. Itin for hem- 
myng of a kertell for my Lady Mary 
iij d. Itin for makyng of a payre of 



JUNE,. 1502. 23 

sieves of white sarcenet for the Queue 
of Scottes iiij d. I tin for making of a 
kirtell for Brigette Crowmer xij d. Itiii 
for hemmyng of a kirtelle of the same 
Bridgettes iij d. Itih for lynyng of a 
gowne for Maistres Zouche xij d. and 
for mending of twoo gownes for Johanne 
Popyncote viij d. . . x s. iij d. 

Itm to Thomas Shurley for money by hym 
delivered for thoffring of the Quene to 
oure Lady of Piewe v d. for milke at 
Richemount iij d. and to a pore man in 
aulmouse somtyme being a servaunt of 
King Edwardes the iiij th xx d. Sin" . ij s. iiij d. 
Itiii to Thomas Barton foteman to the Quene 
for money by him geven in aulmous by 
the commaundement of the Quene in hir 
journeying fro Richemont to Winsore iij s. iiij d. 
Itiii the xvij 111 day of Juyn to a servaunt of the 
Maire of London in reward for bringing 
a present of cherys to the Quene to 
Windesour . . vj s. viij d. 

Itin the xviij th day of Juyn to the Quenes 
purse at Windesore by thandes of Mais- 
tres Weston . . lj ? . iiij d- 
Itiii the same day to my lady Bray for money 
by hir delivered to the ministres of the 
Kinges chapelle to drinke at a taverne 
with a buk xx s * 
Itiii the xix th day of Juyn to the Quenes purse 
by the handes of John Staunton thelder 
atWynsore . - xlv J * vii J d 
Itiii the same day to Maistres Brent at Bay- 
nardes Castle for a 115 of golde of Venice 



24 JUNE, 1502. 

bought of James Jentille to the Quenes 

use .... xxyiij s. 

ELYSABETH. 

|) r Sm a pag. xj li. xix s. vj d. 



Itm the same day to John Staunton thelder 
for money by him payed for x yerdes 
Kendalle for a coote for the fole at viij d. 
the yerde vj s. viij d. Itm for five elnes 
dl of canvas at iiij d. the elne xxij d. 
Itm for dl yerd of Kersey to bordre the 
same xvj d. and for making the same 
coote xvj d. Sni a . xj s. ij d. 

Itm the same day to Lewes Waltier the 
Quenes bargeman for conveyeng the 
Quene from Richemount to Westin the 
vj 111 day of Juyn in hir barge with xxij u 
rowers every rower taking viij d. xiiij s. 
viij d. and the maister xvj d. Itin a 
grete bote and viij rowers the xj 111 day of 
Juyn conveyeng the Quene from Westfii 
to Richemount v s. iiij d. the maister 
xvj d. and the rewarde of the bote xij d. 
Itm the Quenes barge with xxij u rowers 
conveyeng the ladys and gentilwomen 
from Westm to Richemount xiiij s. 
viij d. and the maister xvj d. Sin xxxix s. viij d. 

Itm the xx u day of Juyn to the Queues purs 



JUNE, 1502. 2 

at Windesore by thandes of Maistres 

Brent and Arnold Chollerton xx 3. 

Itm the same day to S r Thomas Couper 
Person of Saint Benettes in London for 
the tithe of Baynardes Castelle and gar- 
deyn there . . x j ^ 

Itm payed for vj ellis of lynnyn cloth sent to 
the Quene by S 1 John Hardy at xx u d. 
the elne x 

A a* 

Itin delivered to dame Margret Cotton for 
the diettes of my lord Henry Courtney 
my lord Edward Courtney and my lady 
Margret theire suster twoo women ser- 
vauntes and a grome from furst day of 
February last past unto the last day of 
May than next following that is to wit 
for xvij wekes at xiij s. iiij d. the weke x li. xiij s. iiij d. 

Itin the xxj tt day of Juyn to Henry Bryan of 
London mercer for xv yerdes dl of blake 
dammaske for a gowne for the Quene at 
vij s. the yerd . . Cviij s. vj d. *"* 

Itm the same day to John Conewey smyth 
for foure transoms and xij standardes 
weyeng iiij" xiiij Ib. at j d. ob. the Ib. 
xj s. ix d. twoo transoms and xv slanders 
weyeng iiij" iij Ib. dl at j d. ob. the Ib. 
x s. v d. q*. Itin in lede for the fasten- 
yng of the same iron xlix Ib. at ob. the 
Ib. ij s. ob. Itin for viij* staples for a 
bedde iiij d. . xxiiij vj d. ob. q'. 

ELYSABETH. 

r Sm" pag. xxiij li. vij s. ij d. ob. q'. 
E 



Q.Q JUNE, 

Itin payed to a mason for iiij dayes werking 
upon the windowes at Baynardes Castell 
for setting in of the said iron . ij s. 

Itin the xxiij* day of Juyn to the Quenes 

purse by thandes of my Lady Anne Percy xx s. 

I tin the xxviij u day of Juyn to the gromes 
and pages of the halle for making bone- 
fyres upon the evyns of Sainct John 
Baptist and Saint Peter . . . vs. 

Itin the same day to the Quenes purse by 

thandes of Maistres Denton . xl s. 

I tin the ij de day of July to William Worthy 
ortherwise called Pfiip for the bourde of 
William the Quenes fole for iij monethes 
ended the last day of Juyn that is to wit 
from the last day of Marche unto the 
furst day of July at ij s. the moneth 
Sm a . , . vj s. 

Itin the same day to the said William Pfiip 
for his wages for keping of the said fole 
by the space of iij quarters of a yere 
ended at Midsomer last past . xx s. 

Itin to the same William for money by him 
payed to Rauf Wise of Grenewiche for 
the diettes and othere necessaryes of the 
said fole there being sik by the space of 
iiij wekes . . . .j iiij s. 

Itin the same day to Edmond Calver page of 
the Quenes chambre for a payre of shois 
for the Quenes fole vj d. Itin for a 
grete basket for the Quenes stuf vj d. 
Itin for going from Richemount to Lon- 
don by the Quenes commaundement by 
the space of ij dayes of divers erandes 



JULY, 1502. <2 

xvj d. Itm for botehire to feche John 
Grice to Westin iij d. Itm for a box of 
iverey weyeng vunces at viij d. the unce 
iij s. iiij d. Itm for pyn povvdre xij d. 
Itin for riding from Winsore to London 
on divers errandes for the Queue by the 
space of iij dayes at viij d. the day ij s. viij s. xj d. 

Itin the ij de day of July to Thomas Fuller of 
Londone mercer in partie of payement 
of a bill signed with the hande of the 
Quene conteignyng the somme of 
due unto him for certain silkes of him 
bought for the behove of the Quene as in 
the same bill it appereth . xxx li. 

Itin the same day for the Queues offring in 
the colleage of Windesore at high masse 
there v s - 

ELYSABETH. 

Sin* pag. xxxv li. x s. xj d. 



Itin the iij de day of July to Agnes Bretayn of 
Londone wedowe for ix poundes and xj 
unces of gold of Venys of hir bought 
for the thuse of the Quene . . xxiij li. xvj s. 

Itm the same day to John Coope of Londone 

taillour for making of certain stuf that 

is to wit for a coveryng of a cheyre of 

cremyson cloth of gold lyned with blewe 

E 2 



28 JULY, 1502. 

satyn vj s. viij d. Itm a nothere cover- 
ing of cremysyn velvet lyned with blew 
satyn vj s. viij d. Itin a coveryng of 
blewe cloth of gold with cheverons lyned 
with crymsyn damaske vj s. viij d. Itin 
a covering for a litter of blewe cloth of 
golde with cheverons lyned with crym- 
syne dammaske vj s. viij d. Itin for 
lynyng of x peces of riche cloth of gold 
with blewe dammaske vj s. viij d. Itin 
for making of xxvij quysshous vj with 
blewe cloth of gold with cheverons the 
oon half of the said quysshons of satyn 
figure the othere six with crymsyn velvet 
and six of crymsyn dammaske and six of 
satyn figure twoo of purple velvet and 
oon quysshon of cloth of gold xxvij s. 
Itm for ix quysshons of cloth of gold ix s. 
Itm for making of the coveringes for the 
said cheyres of red cloth and blewe and 
for the said litters v s. Sm a . Ixxiij s. iiij d. 

Itin the same day delivered to my Lady Bray 
for money by hiue geven at the cristen- 
yng of John Belles childe at Winsore by 
the Quenes commaundement . xxvj s. viij d. 

Itm the same day to the said Lady Bray for 
money by hur geven to a Scottisheman 
scole maister to the prince at his depart- 
ing by the Quenes commaundement . xx s. 

Itm the iiij* 11 day of J uly to the Quenes purs 
at Winsore by thandes of my Lady Anne 
Percy . . xx s. 

Itin the same day to Thomas Woodnote and 
John Feld wayteng upon the Quenes 



JULY, 1502. og 

joelles from Richemount to Grenewiche 
for oon day at vj d. the day xij d. Itin 
from Grenewiche to Richemount for oon 
day at vj d. the day xij d. and from 
Richemount to Windesore for oon daye 
xij d. Itin for the cariage of Frauuces 
Gofer from Robynettes to the Towre 
iiij d. Itm for theire costes riding to the 
crysteynyng of my Lord Mounteioyes 
childe by the space of iij dayes at xij d. 
the day iij s. Sm a . . vj s. iiij d. 

Itin the V th day of July to Robert Alyn for 
money by him deliverd to the Quene for 
hir offring at Windesore. Furst to the 
Holy Crosse ij s. vj d. to Saint George 
ij s. vj d. and to King Henry ij s. vj d. 
and for thoffringes of the Quene of Scottes 
xij d. ... viij s. vj d. 

ELYSABETH. 

<p* Sin* pag. xxxj !i. x s. x d. 



Itin the same day to Giles lewter for striuges 

for the Quene of Scottes lewte x 3. 

Itin the vj* day of July deliverd to Thab- 
basse of Dertford by thandes of John 
Wiredon towardes suche money as the 
said Abbasse hath layed out towardes 
the charges of my Lady Brigit there . kvj s. viij d. 

Itm the same day to the undrekeper of 



30 JULY, 1502. 

Swalowfeld for the bringing of iij bukkes 

from Swalowfeld to Windesore . vj s. viij d. 

Itin the same day to a servaunt of William 
Bulstrode for bringing of a present of 
cakes apulles and cherys to the Queue at 
Windesore . . xx d. 

Itin the same day to my Lady Verney for 
money by hire payed by the commaunde- 
mentof the Quene. Furst in aulmous 
iij s. iiij d. Itiri. in reward geven to the 
Fery man at Datchet iij s. iiij d. Itiri 
in aulmous to an old servaunt of King 
Edwardes vj s. viij d. Itin to hir purs 
upon the evyn of Saint Petre xvij s. . xxx s. iiij d. 

Itin the same day to a servaunt of S r John 
Williams in reward for bringing of twoo 
bukkes to the Quene at Windesore . iiij s. 

Itiri the viij a day of July to Thomas Acworth 

for thexpenses of the Quenes stable Ivj li. iij s. ob. 

Itiri the ix* day of July to Anthony Cotton in 
reward by the commaundement of the 
Quene at Windesore . . xiij s. iiij d. 

Itiri the same day to the underkeper of Berke- 
hampsted for bringing of a buk to the 
Quene to Windesore . iij s. iiij d. 

Itiri the same day to a servaunt of William 
ap Howell for bringing of a popyngay 
to the Quene to Windesore . xiij s. iiij d. 

Itin the X th day of July to Thomas Fisshe 
in reward for bringing of conserva cherys 
from London to Windesore sent from 
Maistres Lees ij s. viij d. and for an 
elne of lynnyn cloth for a sampler for the 
Quene viij d. . . . iij s. iiij d. 



JULY, 1502. 31 

Itm the same day to Henry Smyth clerc of 
the Castell of Windesore for money by 
him payed to a certain labourers to make 
an herbour in the litle parke of Winde- 
sore for a banket for the Queue . iiij s. viij d. 

Itm the same day to the Quenes purs at 
Windesore by thandes of my Lady Anne 
Percy . . xx s. 

Itm the xj* day of July to the dean of the 
Kinges chapell for thoffringes of the 
Quene upon the Feestes of the Nativitie 
of Saint Johne Baptist thappostelles 
Petre and Paul Saint Thomas the Marter 
and Relique Sonday . xx s. 

ELYSABETH. 

,p r Sin 8 pag. Ixvj li. iiij d. ob. 



Itm the same day to the Quenes Aulmoigner 
for thoffring of the Quene upon Sonday 
next after the Nativitie of Saint John 
Baptist at High Masse in the colleage of 
Windesore . .vs. 

Itm the same day to the said Aulmoigner for 
money by him geven to the children of 
the said college of Winsore xx d - 

Itm the xipday of July delivered to the 
Quene for hire offring at oure Lady of 
Cabroke . - V "J d ' 



32 JULY, 1502. 

Itin the same day to the heremite there in 

aulmous . . xij d. 

I tin the same day to a poure man that guyded 

the Quenes grace thider . . iiij d. 

Itin the xiij* 11 day of July to a servaunt of 
dame Margret Cottons for his costes 
commyng from Havering to Notley to 
the Quene to knowe hir pleasire where 
the Lord Edmond son to the Lady Kate- 
ryne shuld be bury ed . . xx d. 

Itin the same day to John Duffyn for his 
costes riding from Richemount to Westin 
for the Quenes confesour on Trinite 
Sonday evyn and for delivering of a Ire of 
the Quenes to Thabbot of Westm xvj d. 
Itifi for his costes riding from Londone 
to Winsore for Maistres Brent and from 
Wendesore to London ayen in message 
to the same Maistres Brent by the space 
of iij dayes ij s. vj d. I tin for his costes 
riding for M. Decons whan his clerk was 
deed to cause him to comme to the Court 
by the space of ij dayes xx d. Itin for 
his costes to Lambeth for countremaund- 
ing of acofer of the Quenes x d. . vj s. iiij d. 

Itin the xiiif 1 day of July to Edmond Cal- 
verd for his costes riding to Vektour 
Courtney vj s. viij d. Itin for an elne of 
yelowe sarcenet for the Quene v s. Itin 
for his costes riding to London by the 
space of iij dayes ij s. vj d. Itin anothere 
tyme for riding to London by the space 
of iij dayes ij s. vj d. and for mending of 
a possenetof the Quenes viij d. . xvij s. iiij d. 



JULY, 1502. 33 

I tin the xix th day of July delivered to the 
Quenes Aulmoner for money by him 
leyed out in aulmous from Windesore to 
Woodstok . . . vij s. 

I tin the same day to the Quenes purse at 
Woodstok by thandes of my Lady Kate- 
ryne . . . xx s. 

Itin the xx" day of July to Thomas Wood- 
note for thexpenses of the Queues grey- 
houndes for the monethes of January 
February Marche Aprill May and Juyn 
that is to wit for C iiij" j dayes at ij d. 
the day . . . xxx s. ij d. 

ELYSABETH. 
|> r SnV pag. iiij li. xj s. ij d. 



Itin the same day to a servaunt of the prior 
of Lantony for bringing a present of 
chesys to the Quene to Woodstok . iij s. iiij d. 

Itin the xxiij* day of July to Richard Justice 
page of the robys for his costes going 
from Richemount to London for a gowne 
of cloth of gold furred with pawmpilyon 
ayenst Corpus Xpi day by the space of 
twoo dayes every day viij d. xvj d. Itm 
for bote hire for the same gowne xij d. 
Itin for going from Richemount to Lon- 
F 



34 AUGUST, 1502. 

done for the making of a gowne of 
crymsyn sattayn by the space of ij dayes 
at viij d. the day xvj d. Itin for mend- 
ing of a lokke upon the warderobe dore 
at Westm iij d. I tin for mending a lokke 
upon a standard ij d. Itin for botehire 
from Westm to London for sarsonettes 
and divers othere thinges iij d. Itin for 
botehire from Westm to London for the 
Querie of Scottes slevys of orenge colour 
sarsonet iij d. Itin for going from 
Westin to Richemount for vj gownes of 
the Quenes by the space of oone day 
viij d. Itin for botehire for the same 
gownes from Richemont to Westm and 
from Westin to Richemount ay en ij s. vij s. iij d. 

Itin the xxiiij u day of July to John Rauf 
yeoman of the close carre for a payre of 
whelys by him bought of William Roke 
of Kydlington vj s. viij d. Itin for the 
bynding and setting on of the strakes 
xij d. Itin for xl Ib. of iron xvj d. ob. 
Itin for making of iij dosyn of nailles 
xij d. Itih for mending and eching of 
iiij hopys to the said whelys ij d. and for 
cariage of the same whelys from Kyd- 
lington to Woodstok iiij d. . xs. vj d.ob. 

Itin the ij de day of August to Anne Saye for 

iij smokkes -..;, . . iij s. iiij d. 

Itin the same day to the Quenes purs by 

thandes of Maistres Brent . xl s. 

Itin the same day to Robert Ragdale taillour 
for making of twoo dubieties for the twoo 
fotemen iij s. iiij d. Itin for lynyng of 



AUGUST, 1502. 3d 

a gowne of blake velvet for the Queries 
grace with wyde slevys with black sarsenet 
with an egge of blake sattayn iij s. iiij d. 
and for mending of divers gownes and 
kirtelles of the Quenes iiij s. x d. . xj s. vj d. 

Itih the iij de day of August to a servaunt of 
the Lord Mountioyes for bringing of 
twoo bukkes from Cornebury to Wood- 
stok to the Quene . ij s. 

ELYSABETH. 

,p r Sin* pag. Ixxvij s. xj d. ob. 



I tin the same day to Robert Alyn for his 
costes prepayring logging for the Quene 
from Richemount to Westm by the 
space of iij dayes at xij d. the day iij s. 
Itin to William Hamerton yeoman to the 
Quenes beddes for iij dayes at xij d. the 
day iij s. I tin to Edmond Burtone yeo- 
man for iij dayes at xij d. the daye iij s. 
Itm to George Hamerton grome porter 
for iij dayes ij s. vj d. Itin to William 
Pole grome for iij dayes ij s. vj d. and to 
Edmond Caverd page for iij dayes ij s. xvj a. 

Itin the same daye to the said Robert for his 
costes prepayring logging for the Quene 
from Windesore to Woodstok by the 
space of vj dayes at xij d. the day vj s. 
Itin to Edmond Levesey yeoman for vj 
dayes vij s. Itin to George Hamerton 
F2 



36 AUGUST, 1502. 

grome portere for vj dayes v s. Itin to 

John Staunton grome for vj dayes v s. 

Itin to John Bright page for vj dayes 

iiij s. and to Henry Rooper page for iiij 

dayes at viij d. the daye ij s. viij d. xxviij s. viij d. 
Itm the same daye to the forsaid Robert Alyn 

for his costes prepayring logging for the 

Quene from Richemount to Grenewiche 

the last day of Marche by the space of 

twoo dayes and from thens to the Towre 

of London the xxvij" day of Aprell by 

the space of twoo dayes that is to wit for 

iiij dayes at xij d. the day iiij s. Itin to 

Edmond Lyvesey yeoman for iiij dayes 

iiij s. Itm to George Hamerton grome 

portere for iiij dayes iij s. iiij d. Itin to 

William Pole grome for twoo dayes xx d. 

Itm to Edmond Calverd page for ij 

dayes xvj d. Itm to John Browne 
grome of the beddes for twoo dayes 
xx d. and to John Feld grome for ij 
dayes xx d. . . . xvij s. viij d. 

ttin the same day to my Lady Verney for 
money by hur delivered by the com- 
maundement of the Quene to Fyll the 
Kinges payntour in reward iij s. iiij d. 
Itin to John Reynold payntour for 
making of divers beestes and othere 
pleasires for the Quene at Windesore 
x s. Itin to a servauut of William Bul- 
strowdes for bringing a present of cherys 
to the Quene to Wycombe xx d. and for 
hir offring to Saint Frydeswyde at Oxon- 
ford xx d. . . . xvj s. viij d. 



AUGUST, 1502. 37 

Itm the iiij* day of August delivered to 
Thabbesse of Elnestowe by thandes of 
John Duffy n for the costes and charges 
of litle Anne Loveday at the making of 
hire nonne there . vj ii. xiij 3. iiij d. 

I tin the V th day of August to Rogier Elys for 
a barrell of greese of hym bought by 
William Hamerton for the lycoryng of 
the Quenes barehydes x j; ^ 

T ~^ 

Itm the same day to a servaunt of the Prior 
of Lanthony for bringing a present of 
chesys to the Queue to Langley, . iij s. iiij d. 

ELYSABETH. 

j? r Sm a pag. xj li. vij s. viij d. 



Itm the same day delivered to M. Xpofre 
Plommer for money by him geven in 
aulmous for the Quene at divers tymes 
in hur journeys . . . xxiij s. 

Itm the vj* day of August to the Quenes 
purs at Langley by thandes of my Lady 
Anne Percy . . vj li. xiij s. iiij d. 

Itm delivered for thoffring of the Quene at 
hir being sikke at Woodstok to oure 
Lady at Northampton ij s. vj d. and to 
fyve preestes for v masses doon before 
oure Lady there xx d. Itm for thoffring 
of the Quene to the Roode at Northamp- 
ton xij d. and to oure Lady at Linche- 
lade ij s. vd. . . . vij s. viij d. 



38 AUGUST, 1502. 

Itin the same day delivered for the Queries 
almous at hir departing from Woodstok 
to Langley . . . xxj d. 

Itin the same day to Maistres Bellknap for 
money by hir delivered by the com- 
maundement of the Queue to the Quene 
of Scottes at Windesore . lt. I xx s. 

Itin delivered to Maistres Bourne for money 
by hur payed for Maistres Anne Saye. 
Furst for vj yerdes of fustyan price the 
yerd vij d. iij s. vj d. Itin for lynyng 
and lynnyn cloth to the same xvj d. Itin 
for making of the same kirtell xij d. and 
for hose and shone for the same Anne 
ij s. viij d. i . . viij s. vj d. 

Itin delivered for the Queues offring at Flex- 
ley Abbey to the high aulter there . v s. 

Itin the xiiij* day of August to the Kinges 

garde in rewarde with a buk . xx s. 

Itin the same day to thofficers and kepers of 
the Quenes stable with a buk in reward 
at Monmouth . . x s. 

Itin to Jaques Hawte for money by him de- 
livered to a woman that brought a pre- 
sent of cakys and pearys to the Quene xij d. 

Itin the same day to certain personnes in 
Litle Dean in the Forrest of Dean that 
wrought in fynyng of iron in reward ... x s. 

Itin in rewarde to the keper of the parke of 
Miserder for bringing thre bukkes to 
Monmouth . . jj r . v s. 

Itin for the keper of the parke of Brymes- 
feld for bringing twoo bukkes to Mon- 
mouth to the Quene . . ij s. viij d. 



AUGUST, 1502. 30 

Itin to the Kinges harbegiers in rewarde with 
a buk at Monmouth 

A ?> 

Itin delivered to my Lady Verney for money 
by hure offred by the Quenes com 
maundement to Saint Frydeswyde at 
Oxonford . . xx d. 

ELYSABETH. 

,p r Sih a pag. xij li. xix s. vij d. 



Itin the XV th day of August to John Browne 
grome of the Quenes beddes for carieng 
of certain stuf from Baynardes Castell to 
Richemounte whan thambassidours of 
Hungry were ther iij s. iiij d. Itin for 
his costes going from Richemounte to 
London to Maistres Stafford by the 
Quenes commaundement by the space of 
iij dayes at x d. the day ij s. vj d. Itin 
at a nother tyme for his costes going from 
Richemount to London to Maistres Staf- 
ford for Maistres Lokke by the space of 
twoo dayes at xd. the daye xx d. Itin 
for his costes going from Richemount to 
Baynardes Castell fore bringing up the 
bedde of a Tourney by the Quenes com- 
maundement iiij d. Itin for an hamper 
to carye in pepyns for the Quene vj d. 
Itm for his costes riding to Therl of 
Northumbreland by the space of a day 
x d. and for his costes riding to the Lord 



40 AUGUST, 1502. 

of Arundell by the space of iij dayes 

ij s. vj d. . . . xj s. viij d. 

Itm the same daye to Thomas Hoden for 
keping of his childe geven to the Quene 
for the half yere ended at Mydsomer last 
past . . . . xiij s. iiij d. 

Itm the same daye to Thomas Woodnote and 
John Felde gromes of the Quenes 
chambre for thaire costes \vayting upon 
the Queues joy elles from Richemount to 
Windesore from Windesore to Wycombe 
from Wycombe to Notley from Notley 
to Bostall from Bostall to Woodstok and 
for Woodstok to Langley by the space of 
vj dayes either of theiin at vj d. the day 
vj s. Itm to the same Thomas \\ ood- 
note for his costes from Windesore to 
London by the space of iij dayes at x d. 
the day ij s. vj d. . . viij s. vj d. 

Itm the xviij* day of August to Robert 
Johnson the Quenes taillour in partye of 
pavement of a bill signed with thande 
of the Quene conteignyng the somme of 
xxxij li. xvj s. j d. to him due for 
making of certain robys gownys kyrtilles 
and othere apparrell belonging to the 
Quenes grace and divers ladyes and 
gentilwomen being at hur fynding as 
appereth by the said bill . xiij li. vj s. viij d. 

Itm the xix* day of August by Henry Ropers 
servaunt for his costes commyng behinde 
with the cartes of stuf from Langley to 
Ragland by the space of vj dayes at 
iiij d. the day . : &* t.fi ij s. 



AUGUST, 1502. 41 

Itm the same day to the Quenes purs by 
thandes of my Lady Elisabeth Stafford 
atRaglang . . . xl s. 

ELYSABETH. 
<p r Sm a pag. xvij li. ij s. ij d. 



Itm the same day to Hugh Denys for money 
by him delivered to a straungier that 
gave the Queue a payre of clavycordes in 
crownes for his rewarde . . iiij li. 

Itm the xx u day of August to Robert Alyn 
for his costes prepayring logging for the 
Quene from Woodstok to Ragland by 
the space of xj dayes at xij d. the day 
xj s. Itin to Edmond Lyvesey yeoman 
for x dayes at xij d. the day x s. Itm 
to George Hamerton grome porter for 
x dayes at x d. the day viij s. iiij d. Itm 
to John Staunton grome of the Quenes 
chambre for x dayes at x d. the day viij s: 
iiij d. Itin to John Browne grome of 
the beddes with the Quenes grace for ix 
dayes at x d. the daye vij s. vj d. Itm 
to William Gentilman page of the 
chambre for x dayes at viij d. the day vj s. 
viij d. and to Henry Roper page of the 
beddes for ij dayes at viij d. the day 
xvj d. . . . Hij s. ij d. 



42 AUGUST, 1502. 

Itin the xxj u day of August to Arnolde Chol- 
lerton for his costes prepayring logging 
for the Quene from Grenewiche to 
Richemounte by the space of twoo dayes 
at xij d. the daye ij s. Itm to Edmond 
Lyvesey yeoman for ij dayes at xij d. the 
day ij s. Itm to John Browne grome 
of the beddes for ij dayes at x d. the 
day xx d. Itin to William Pole for ij 
dayes at x d. the daye xx d. Itin to 
Edmond Calverd page for ij dayes at 
viij d. the day xvj d. Itm to the said 
Arnold for his costes prepayring logging 
for the Quene from Richemount to 
Windesore by the space of twoo dayes 
at xij d. the day ij s. Itin to Edmond 
Lyvesey yeoman for ij dayes at xij d. the 
day ij s. Itin to John Browne grome 
of the beddes for twoo dayes at x d. the 
day xx d. Itin to William Pole grome 
for twoo dayes xx d. And to Edmond 
Calverd page for ij dayes at viij d. the 
day xvj d. . . . xvij s. iiij d. 

Itin the xxij" day of August to the Kinges 
Aulmoner for the Quenes offring to 
Saint Anne in the wood besides Bristowe ij s. vj d. 

Itin the same day to John Hamerton for 
money by him delivered to the Quene 
for hir offring at hir departing from 
Windesore. Furst to the high aulter 
within the Kinges Colleage there ij s. 
vj d. Itin to Saint George ij s. vj d. 
Itin to King Henry ij s. vj d. . vij s. vj d. 

Itin the xxiiij" day of August delivered to the 






AUGUST, 1502. 43 

Queries grace at Tabuls by thandes of 
Maistres Lee at Ragland . . x s. 

ELYSABETH. 

<p* Sin 8 pag. viij li. x s. vj d. 



Itin the xxviij u day of August to a servaunt 
of S' Waltier Herbertes in reward for 
bringing a goshawke to the Quene to 
Chepstowe . . x s. 

Itin the same day to the mariners that con- 
veyed the Quenes grace over Severn be- 
sides Chepstowe . . xs. 

Itin the same day to the Quenes purs at Wal- 

leston by thandes of my Lady Verney xl s. 

Itm the xxix" day of August to a servaunt of 
M. Esterfeldes of Bristowe in rewarde 
for bringing of a present of oranges and 
sukcades to the Quene to Berkeley . ij 3. 

Itm the same daye to the churche of Thome- 
bury . . . xx d. 

Itin the last day of August to my Lady Anne 
Percy for money by hire geven in re- 
ward to a Spanyarde that camme from 
the Princesse to the Quene into Walys xx s. 

Itm the ij* 16 day of Septembre to the Quenes 
purs at Berkeley by thandes of Maistres 
Brent . C s. 

G 2 



44 SEPTEMBER, 1502. 

Itin the same day to Thomas Woodnote and 

John Felde gromes of the Quenes 

chambre for thaire costes wayting upon 

the Quenes joyelles from Langley to 

Northlache from Northlache to Coberley 

from Coberley to the Vineyarde from 

the Vyneyarde to Flexley Abbey from 

Flexley Abbey to Troye and from Troye 

to Ragland by the space of vj dayes 

eithere of theim at vj d. the day . vj s. 

I tin the same Thomas Woodnote and John 

Felde for theire costes going before with 

the Quenes jewelles from Ragland to 
Berkeley by the space of x dayes eithere 
of theim at x d. the day . $ xvj s. viij d. 

Itin the same day to a servaunt of the Priour 
of Lanthonys in rewarde for bringing of 
a present of chesys to the Quene to Ber- 
keley . . . ij 8. 
Itin the same day to the Quenes mynstrelles 

in reward . . . xl s. 

Itin the iij de day of Septembre to Edmond 
Calverd for fyve yerdes of blake chamlet 
at ij s. iiij d. the yerde xj s. viij d. Itin 
for fyve yerdes of tawny chamlet at ij s. 
the yerde x s. Itin for eight yerdes of 
buk ram at v d. the yerde iij s. iiij d. and 
for his costes riding for the same stuf 
from Berkeley to Bristowe by the space 
of ij dayes xx d. . . xxvj s. viij d. 

Itin the same day to a servaunt of the Lord 
Saintmondes for bringing of twoo bukkes 
to the Quene to Berkeley * . ij s. viij d. 



SEPTEMBER, 1502. 45 

Itiii the same day for bringing of venyson 
from Fastern to London by the Queues 
commaundement . . vj s. viij d. 

ELYSABETH. 

J}* Sm" pag. xiiij li. iiij s. iiij d. 



Itin the iiij 111 day of Septembre to John Belly 
yeoman of the Quenes stuf for money by 
him layed out for certain necessaries for 
the Quenes lytter. Furst for viij dosyn 
silke pointes price the dosyn iij d. ij s. 
Itm for CCC pynnes price the C iiij d. 
xij d. Itin for fyre to drye the stuf iij s. 
Itm for a yerde of freese vj d. Itm for 
iij litter pynnes of iron vj d. and for ij 
brusshis vj d. . . vij s. vj d. 

Itm the same day for cariage of vj bukkes 

from Fastern to Berkeley to the Quene iiij s. 

Itin the V th day of Septembre for cariage of 
the Quenes stole from London to Oxon- 
ford and from Oxonford to Langley . xiiij d. 

Itin the X th day of Septembre to a servaunt 
of the Lord Saintmondes for bringing of 
twoo bukkes from Blakemore to Fayre- 
ford to the Quene . .vs. 

Itin the same day of Septembre to Thomas 
Acwurth for thexpenses of the Quenes 
stable . - iiij"vjli. xxij d. ob. q. 

Itin the same day to John Bolton for his costes 



46 SEPTEMBER, 1502. 

riding from Berkeley to Bristowe for 

wyne for the Queue . . xij d. 

Itin the xij* 11 day of Septembre to the keper 
of Cosham Parke for bringing of v 
bukkes from thens to Fayreford to the 
Quene . . .vs. 

Itin the same day to a guyde that guyded the 
Quenes grace from Cotes place to Fayre- 
ford .... viij d. 

Itin the xiij" 1 day of Septembr to a servaunt 
of the Lord Saintmondes for bringing of 
vj bukkes from the Forrest of Pevisham 
and Blakemore to the Quene to Fayre- 
ford . . . vj s. 

Itin the same day to the Quenes purs at 

Fayreford , . xl s. 

Itfn the same day to Agnes Dean the Quenes 
laundre for hir hors mete betwene 
Windesore and Berkeley by the space of 
Ix dayes at iiij d. the day . . xx s. 

Itin the same day to Richard Justice page of 
the robys for money by him payed to a 
guyde that went from Monmouth foure 
myles bakewarde towardes Flexley Abbey 
to guyde a wayne laden with stuf of the 
Warderobe of the robys that was broken 
to Monmouth forsaid viij d. Itin for 
making of twoo dublettes for the Quenes 
fotemen of crymsyn velvet at xx d. the 
pece iij s. iiij d. Itin to the same Richard 
for his costes riding from Wollestone to 
Berkeley to receyve the close carre and 
a loode of stuf that went aboute by 
Gloucestre from Ragland to Berkeley 



. 
SEPTEMBER, 1502. 47 

by the space of twoo dayes at viij d. the 

<%xvjd. . .vs. iiijd. 

ELYSABETH. 

,p r Sm a pag. iiij" x li. xvij s. vj d. ob. q a . 



I tin the same day to John Duffy n for his costes 
riding from Woodstok to Antell by the 
Quenes commaundement from Antell to 
Thabbesse of Elstowe from Elstowe to 
Herauld for a buk for the professing of 
a nonne of Elstowe forsaid and from 
thens to the courte to S r Giles Brigges 
place by the space of vij dayes at x d. 
the day . . . v s. x d. 

Itin the same day to the keper of the parke 
of the Devyes for bringing of vj bukkes 
from thens to Fayreford to the Quene vj s. viij d. 

Itm the same day to John Staunton for money 
by him payed to a man that guyded the 
Quene from Flexley Abbey to Troye be- 
sides Monmouth . . . iij s. iiij d. 

Itfn the xiiij* 11 day of Septembre to a servaunt 
of the Lord Saintmondes for bringing of 
a buk to the Quene to Fayreford xvj d. 

Itin the xvj* day of Septembre to John 
Staunton for money by him geven in re- 
warde to a woman that brought a present 
of apulles to the Quene to Fayreford 
from the LadyHungreford . . iij s. iiij d. 



48 SEPTEMBER, 1502. 

I tin the same day to a servaunt of the Lord 
Saintmondes for bringing of twoo bukkes 
to the Quene to Langley . . ij s. viij d. 

Itm the xvij" 1 day of Septembre to John Grice 
appoticary for certain stuf of his occu- 
pacon by him delivered to th'use of the 
Quene as by bill signed with thande of 
hure grace it appereth . . x li. xix s. xj d. 

Itm the same daye for cariage of v bukkes 

from Fastern to the Princesse to London x s. 

Itm the same day for cariage of twoo bukkes 

from Fastern to Langley to the Quene ij s. viij d. 

Itm the same day to the Quenes purs at 

Langley . . . xl s. 

Itm the xviij* day of Septembre to the keper 
of the parke of the Devyes for bringing 
of iiij bukkes to the Quene to Langley vs. iiij d. 

Itm the xix* day of Septembre to a servaunt 
of the Maires of London in rewarde for 
bringing of twoo barrelles of Rynnysshe 
wyne from London to Langley to the 
Quene . . . 

Itm the xx ti day of Septembre to the Quenes 

purs at Langley . . xlli. 

Itm for bourding of Anne Saye oon of the 
Quenes gentilwomen being sikke at 
Woodstok by the space of viij wekes 
at xvj d. the weke . . x s. viij d. 

ELYSABETH. 
j) r Sin 8 pag. Ivj li. xj s. ix. d. 



SEPTEMBER, 1502. 49 

Itin the xxj" day of Septembre to Lyonard 
Twycrosse servaunt to John Gyrce appo- 
ticary towardes his wedding gowne . xvj s. 

Itffi the xxvj'day of Septembre to the Quenes 

purs by thandes of my Lady Anne Percy xl s. 

Itin the xxvij" day of Septembre to Robert 
Alyn for his costes prepayring logging 
for the Quene from Ragland to Chep- 
stowe by the space of twoo dayes from 
Chepstowe to Walstone ij dayes from 
Walstone to Berkeley ij dayes from Ber- 
keley to Beverstone twoo dayes from 
Beverstone to Cotes place twoo dayes 
from Cootes place to Fayreford twoo 
dayes and from Fayreford to Langley oon 
day that is to wit by the space of xiij 
dayes at xij d. the day xiij s. I tin to 
William Hamerton yeoman for ij dayes 
ij s. Itin to Edmond Bourtone yeoman 
for xiij dayes xiij s. Itin to George 
Hamerton grome porter for xij dayes x s. 
Itin to William Pole grome for xiij dayes 
x s. x d. Itin to John Browne grome 
for ix dayes vij s. vj d. Itin to John 
Bright page for xij dayes viij s. and to 
Henry Roper page for twoo dayes xvj d. 
Sin a . . . . . Ixv s. viij d. 

Itin the xxviij" day of Septembre to John 
Wereclon for his costes prepayring log- 
ging from Richemount to Ragland and 
from Ragland to Langley by the space 
of xx u dayes at xij d. the day xx s. and 
to the same John for his costes riding 
from Windesore to Dartford to my Lady 
H 



50 SEPTEMBER, 1502. 

Brigget by the space of twoo dayes at 

xij d. the day ij s. Sm a . . xxij s. 

Itih the same day to John Browne grome of 
the beddes for his costes riding afore from 
Windesore to Woodstok with the Quenes 
stuf by the space of twoo dayes xx d. 
Itm for his costes going before from 
Notley to Woostok with stuf of the 
Quenes by the space of iiij dayes at x d. 
the day iij s. iiij d. and for his costes 
riding afore with the said stuf from 
Ragland to Berkeley by the space of viij 
dayes vj s. viij d. sm a . . xj s. viij d. 

I tin the same day to Maister Harding clerc 
of the Quenes closed for money by him 
geven in aulmous at divers tymes by the 
Quenes commaundement . . ij s. viij d. 

Itin the same day to Richard Smyth yeoman 
of the robis for money by him payed for 
a plyte of lawnde for a shirte for the 
childe of grace at Reding v s. Itin for 
making of the same shirte iiij d. and for 
offring to our Lady of Cawseham iiij d. 
by the Quenes commaundement. sm* v s. viij d. 

|> r Sm* pag. viij ii. iij s. viij d. 





OCTOBER, 1502. 



Itm the same day to William Hamertone 
yeoman of the beddes for money by him 
geven in rewarde to a poure man that 
drove the charyet from Coberley to Chep- 
stowe by the Queues commaundement iij s. iiij d. 

Itm the ij de day of Octobre to a servaunt of 
my Lady Herbart wif to S r Waltier Her- 
bert Knight in reward for bringing of an 
hert to the Quene to Langley . x s. 

Itm the iij de day of Octobre to Maistres 
Bourne at Langley for laces rybandes and 
sarcenet for gurdelles for the Quene . xl s. 

Itin the vj* day of Octobre to the Quenes 
purs at Minstre Lovell by thandes of my 
Lady Anne Percy . . xx s. 

Itin the same day to a servaunt of S* John 
Longes in reward for bringing of a crane 
to the Quene . . xij d. 

Itin the \ij* day of Octobre to the Quenes 
purse at Minstre Lovel by thandes of 
John Staunton thelder . . xx s. 

Itm the same day to the Quenes purs by 

thandes of the said John Staunton . xx s. 

Itm the same day to William Hamerton for 
making of a bedde stedde for the Quene 
and for certain iron werke therunto be- 
longing at Minstre Lovell . . iiij 

Itin the ix* day of Octobre to Richard Cot- 
tone for thuse of the bretherhed of Ifius 
gilde at Grantham iij s. iiij d. 

Itin the same day to Thomas Holdeyn for 
thexpenses of Fraunceys from Abyndone 
to London . . x s. 

Itin the same day to Griffith Morgan for 

H-2 



52 OCTOBER, 1502. 

thexpenses of Maistres Anne Say being 

sikke at Abyndon . xx d. 

Itm delivered to oone that was foteman to my 

Lord Prince in aulmous at Abyndon . iij s. iiij d. 

Itm the xj* day of Octobre to a servaunt of 
S r John Shaa Knight for brynging twoo 
vesselles with Renysshe wyne from Lon- 
done to Esthampsted in rewarde . xiij s. iiij d. 

Itrn the xiij" 1 day of Octobre to my Lady 
Gilford for money by hure delivered to 
the Queues grace at Ewelme playeng at 
dyce .... xiij s. iiij d. 

Itm the same day to my Lady Bray for money 

by hure delivered to the Quenes grace . xvj s. viij d. 

<p r Sm a pag. x li. 



Itm the same day to Maistres Belknap for a 
reward geven to a servant of the Bisshop 
of Rouchestre for bringing a present of 
grapes to the Queue . . iij s. iiij d. 

Itm the same day to Maistres Lee for money 
by hure geven in rewarde to a servauut of 
my Lord Prince that cam in message to 
the Quenes grace vj s. viij d. Also for 
money by hure delivered to the Quenes 
grace at dice vj s. viij d. Sm a . xiij s. iiij d. 

Itm to the same Maistres Lee for money by 
hure geven in reward to a servant be- 
longing to my lady the Kinges moder . vj s. viij d. 

Itm the \\j A day of Octobre to my Lady 



OCTOBER, 1502. 53 

Bray for money by hure geven in re- 
warde to a disare that played the Shep- 
pert before the Quene . . iij s. iiij d. 

Itin the same day to John Staunton thelder 

towardes the byeng of an hors . vj s. viij d. 

Itin the same day to Henry Roper for his 
servauntes costes commyng behiude with 
the Quenes stuf of the warderobe of hur 
beddes from Ragland to Abyndonby the 
space of viij dayesat iiij d. the day . ij s. viij d. 

Itin the same day to the Quenes purs at Est- 

hamstede . . C s. 

Itih the xxiij" day of Octobre to Anne Buk- 
nam oon of the Quenes gentilwomen in 
rewarde by the Quenes commaundement Ixvj s. viij d. 

Itin the xxv u day of Octobre to the Quenes 
purs at Richemounte by thandes of 
Maistres Brent . . xl s. 

Itin the same day to a poure woman that 
brought a present of apuls from Howns- 
lowe to the Quene to Richemouute . xx d. 

Itin the same day to a servaunt of Thabbottes 
of Obourne for bringing a present of 
woodcokkes to the Quene to Riche- 
mounte . . . . iij s. iiij d. 

Itin the xxviij* day of Octobre to Robert 
Alyn for the Quenes offring on Symond 
day and Jude at Westminster v s. 

r Sm a pag. xij li. xij s. viij d. 



54 NOVEMBER, 1502. 

Itin the same day to my Lady Verney for 
money by hur payed to Carvenelle for 
his costes riding to thePrincesse vs. and 
to Robert Ragdale for making and 
lynyng of a kirtelle and othere geere ij s. vij s. 

Itm the last day of Octobre to William Shaad 
for bringing a present of chekyns to the 
Quene . . . iij s. iiij d. 

Itm the same day to my Lady Bray for 
money by hure geven to a poure woman 
that brought a present of byrdes to the 
Quene . . . iij s. iiij d. 

Itm the same day to the Quenes purs by 

thandes of my Lady Anne Percy . xl s. 

I tin the furst day of Novembre to the chil- 
dren of the Kinges chapell in reward . xiij s. iiij d. 

Itin for thoffring of the Quene upon the Fest 
of Alle Saintes v s. and at hure housell 
xx d. Sin a . " ; ' . vj s. viij d. 

Itin the same day to the Quenes purs at West- 
minster by thandes of my Lady Gurden xl s. 

Itin the iij de day of Novembre to Elys Hilton 
grome of the robys for money by him 
payed for six yerdes of sarcenet for tip- 
pettes for the Quene at ij s. the yerde 
xijjs./ Itin for twoo yerdes dl blake 
lynyng that was put betwene the out- 
side and the lynyng of the Quenes cloke 
at xij d. the yerde ij s. vj d. and for 
making the same cloke iij s. iiij d. Sm a xvij s. x d. 

Itin the same day to the said Elys Hilton for 
caryeng certain stuf of the Warderobe 
of the beddes by water from Richemounte 
to Baynardes Castell . . xiiij d. 



NOVEMBER, 1502. 55 

Itfn for the Quenes offring at the obyt of the 

Kinges Fader holden at Westminster . v s. 

r Sm'pag. vj li. xvij s. viij d. 



Itm the iiij th day of Novembre to my Lady 
Verney for money by hure payed for 
thexpenses of the hors of Margret Yone 
from the xiij* day of Juyn anno xvij to 
the xxv* 1 day of Octobre anno xviij R% 
H. vij mi . that is to wit by the space of 
Cxxxv dayes at iiij d. the day xxv s. Itm 
to Robynet the Quenes brawderer for 
j unce of flatte gold price v s. Itm ij 
oncz rounde golde price the ounce iiij s. 
iiij d. viij s. viij d. Itin to Rawlennys 
wif in reward for bringing a present to 
the Quene iij s. iiij d. Sm a . xlij s. 

Itin the same day to Henry Bryan in partie of 
payement of a bille signed with the 
Quenes hande conteignyng the sornme of 
Cvij li. x s. q a . to him due for certain 
silkes and othere stuf of his occupacon 
by him delivered to th'use of the Quene 
as by the same bille it appereth . xxxij li. vj s. 

Itin the same day to Robynet the Quenes 
brawderer for his bourde wages and for 
the hiere of othere brawderers and for 
thaire bourde wages werking upon the 
Quenes riche bedde and for certain stuf 
bought by the said Robynet as appereth 
by a bille signed with thande of the 
Quene . . . vj li. xviij s. xj d. 



56 NOVEMBER, 1502. 

I tin the same day to Richard Cokkes of Lon- 
don berebruere for lij barrelles of bere 
for the Fryers Observauntes at Grene- 
wiche to theim geven by the Quene in 
almous for an hole yere ended at Mig- 
helmas last past . . vj li. xviij s. viij d. 

Itin the V th day of Novembre to William Bul- 
strowde for the Quenes offring to Saint 
Edward and the reliques at Westminster vij s. vj d. 

|> r Sin 3 pag. xlviij li. xiij s. j d. 



Itin the same day to Richard Bailly yeoman of 
the chambre for his costes going before 
and prepayring lodging by the Quenes 
commaundement from Langley to Minstre 
Lovelle by the space of a day xij d. and 
from Minstre Lovelle to Abyndon for 
twoo dayes ij s. Sm a . . iij s. 

Itin the same day to John Hynsted of Lon- 
done wex chaundeler for iiij rolles of 
white wex cont' iiij Ib. price the Ib. 
xvj d. Sm a v s. iiij d. and for xij rolles 
of yelowe wex of xij Ib. price the Ib. viij d. 
viij s. Sin 3 tot. . . . xiij s. iiij d. 

Itm the vj* day of Novembre to Edmond 
Calverd page of the chambre for butter 
egges and milke by him bought at divers 
tymes for the Quenes use vs. vj d. Itin 
to John Bright for money by him layed 
out at divers tymes for butter egz and 
milke iiij s. and to William Gentilman 
for money by him layed out at divers 



NOVEMBER, 1502. 57 

tymes for butter egz and milke for the 

Queues use ij s. viij d. Sm . xij s. ij d. 

Itm the same day to Thabbasse of the Mino- 
resse in almous vj s. viij d. Itm to Dame 
Kateryne nonne ther iij s. iiij d. Itm to 
Dame Elisabeth also nonne of the same 
place ij s. Itin to a nonne doughter unto 
William Cromer ij s. and to a poure 
woman servaunt to the said Abbasse xx d. 
Sm a . . . xv s. viij d. 

Itin the viij^day of Novembre to the Queues 
purs at Westminster by thandes of my 
Lady Verney . . . xl s. 

Itm the ix* day of Novembre to Maistres 
Mary Ratclif for money by hure lent to 
the Quenes grace . . xiij li. vj s. viij d. 

r Sm a pag. xvij li. x s. x d. 



Itm the X th day of Novembre to my Lady 
Bray for Iij barrelles of bere delivered to 
the Fryers Observauntes at Canterbury 
for an hole yere ended at Cristmas next 
commyng . . vj li. xviij s. viij d. 

Itm the same day to John Hamerton for the 
hyere of a hors to conveye Maistres 
Lakyn from Esthampsted to London . xvj d. 

Itin the same day to Robert Alyn for his 
costes prepayring logging for the Quene 
from Langley to Mynystre Lovelle by the 
space of oon day xij d. Itm to the same 
Robert for his costes from Minstre Lovell 



58 NOVEMBER, 1502. 

to Abyndon by the space of twoo dayes 
at xij d. the day ij s. Itin to the same 
Robert for his costes from Riehemount 
to Westminster by the space of twoo 
dayes ij s. Itin to Edmond Bourton 
yeoman of the chambre for his costes by 
the space of v dayes at xij d. the day vs. 
Itm to William Hamerton yeoman for ij 
dayes ij s. Itin to George Hamerton 
grome porter for v dayes at x d. the day 
iiij s. ij d. Itin to William Pole grome 
for iij dayes ij s. vj d. Itin to John 
Duflyn grome for ij dayes xx d. Itin to 
John Brown grome for ij dayes xx d. 
Itin to John Bright page for five dayes 
at viij d. the day iij s. iiij d. and to Henry 
Roper page for ij dayes at viij d. the day 
xvj d. Sin* . . . xxvj s. viij d. 

Itin the same day to Robert Alyn for a sheffe 
and an half of brode arrowes at ij d. the 
arrowe vj s. and for a sheeff of brode 
heddes at ij d. the hedde iiij s. Sm a . x s. 

' Sm" pag. viij li. xvj s. viij d. 



Itni the xj* day of Novembre to William 
Pole grome of the chambre for his costes 
going from Windesore to London with 
venyson for William Bulstrowde by the 
commaundement of the Quenes grace by 
the space of twoo dayes at x d. the day 



NOVEMBER, 1502. 59 

xx d. Itin an othere tyme for conveyeng 
of venyson from Windesore forsaid to 
London to the said William Bulstrowde 
by the space of twoo dayes xx d. Itin 
for the hyereof an hors to cary the said 
venyson by the space of iiij dayes at iiij d. 
the day xvj d. Itin for his costes going 
for M. Lynch from M. Reeds place to 
Oxonford x d. and for his costes riding 
from Langley to the Lady Marques into 
Lincolnshire by the space of v dayes at 
x d. the day iiij s. ij d. Sm* . ix s. viij d. 

Itin the same day to Thomas Holden and 
John Felde for theire costes way ting upon 
the Quenes joyelles from Langley to 
Minstre Lovelle from Minstre Lovelle to 
Abyndon from Abyndon to Ewelme from 
Ewelme to Henley upon Thamys from 
Henley to Esthampsted from Esthamp- 
sted to Windesore from Windesore to 
Richemount and from Richemount to 
Westminster by the space of viij dayes 
eithere of theim at vj d. the day . viij s. 

Itin the same day to Thomas Woodnot for the 
expenses of the Quenes greyhoundes for 
the monethes of July August and Sep- 
tembre that is to wit for iiij" xij dayes at 
ij d. the day . . . xv s. iiij d. 

Itin the xij* day of Novembre to Doctoure 
Undrewood the Quenes confessoure for 
money by him dault in aulmous in Lon- 
don by the Quenes commaundement . xx s. 

<p r Sm* pag. Iiij s. 
72 



60 NOVEMBER, 1502. 

Itm the same day to Thomas Woodnote and 
John Felde gromes of the Queues cham- 
bre for thaire costes way ting upon the 
Quenes joyelles from Barkeley to Bever- 
stone from Beverstone to Cootes Place 
from Cootes Place to Fayreford and from 
Fayreford to Langley by the space of iiij 
dayes eithere of theim at vj d. the day 
iiij s. Itm to the same Thomas Wood- 
note for his costes riding from Langley to 
London by the Quenes commaundement 
and from London to Langley again by 
the space of v dayes at x d. the day iiij s. 
ij d. and for caryeng of certain stuf from 
Londone to Langley xvj d. Sin* . ix s. vj d. 

Itm the same day to Jamys Gentylle and 
Thomas Hynde mercers of London in 
partie of payement of a bille signed with 
thande of the Quenes grace conteignyng 
Cxxix li. xvj s. vj d. to theim due for 
certain stuf of thaire occupacon by theim 
delivered to th'use of the Quene . xlvj li. 

Itm xiij* day of Novembre to Lewes Waltier 
for conveyeng the Quene in hure barge 
with xx a rowers from Richemounte to 
Westminster the xxvij day of Octobre 
every rower taking viij d. xiij s. iiij d. and 
the maistre xvj d. Itm the same day a 
grete bote conveyeng the ladyes and gen- 
tilwomen from Richemount forsaid to 
Westminster with x rowers at viij d. the 
rower vj s. viij d. and the maister xvj d. 
Itm the rewarde of the bote xij d. Itm 
to the said Lewes for conveyeng the 





NOVEMBER, 1502. fi 

Princesse in the Queues barge with xvj 
rowers from the Bisshop of Duresme 
Place to Westminster and from West- 
minster again the vj* day of Novembre 
every rowere taking iiij d. Sin 8 v s. iiij d. 
and the maister xvj d. Sin 8 tot. . xxx s. iiij d. 

p r Sm a pag. xlvij li. xixs. x d. 



Itm the same day to S r Richard Lewes Knight 
for a cheyne of golde with vij knottes 
wayeng vij onz dl and dl quarter price 
the onz xxvj s. viij d. Sin* . x li iij s. iiij d. 

Itm the same day to William Wurthy other- 
wise called Phip for the bourde of Wil- 
liam the Quenes fole for iiij monethes 
ended the last day of Octobre that is to 
wit from the furst day of July unto the 
last day of Octobre at ij s. the moneth viij s. 

Itm to the same William Wurthy for a payre 
of hosyn by him bought for the said Foole 
x d. Itm for a payre of shoys vij d. 
Itm for cloughting the same shoys iij d. 
and for a payre of sokkes for the same 
fole ij d. Sm a . . . xxij d. 

Itm to the same William Wurthy for a quarter 

wages ended at Mighelmas last past . vj s. viij d. 

Itin the same day to Anthony Spynelle for vij 

onz of golde of Venys at iiij s. the onz xxviij s. 

Itin the same day to Maistres Brent for 
money by hure payed for xxvij" elles dl 



62 NOVEMBER, 1502. 

of fyne lynon cloth by hure bought for 
the Quenes use of oon Hans Merschet 
at iij s. viij d. the elle . C s. x d. 

I tin the same day to Hamlet Clegge for 
money by him layed out by the Quenes 
commaundement to the keper of Dachet 
Ferrey in rewarde for conveyeng the 
Quenes grace over Thamys there . iij s iiij d. 

Itin the same day to the Quenes purs by 

thandes of Maistres Brent . xl s. 

Itiri the xiiij* day of Novembre to M. Xpofre 
Plonaer for money by him dault in 
aulmous by the Quenes commaundement 
at divers tymes betwene Berkeley and 
London . . . xx s. iiij d. 

Itin the same day to Richard Mylner of Bynd- 
feld for bringing a present of fesauntes 
cokkes to the Quene to Westminster . v s. 

,p r Sm a pag. xx li. xvij s. iiij d. 



Itiri the same day to Maistres Harrecourte for 
hure costes whiche camme to the Quenes 
grace to Westminster to have been hure 
norice by the labor of Dame Kateryn 
Grey . . . . vj s. viij d. 

Itfh the same day to Thomas Acwurth for 

thexpenses of the Quenes stable Cxxxviij li. xiij s. ix d.q*. 

Itin the xv th day of Novembre to Dame Mar- 
gret Cotton for the diettes of my Lord 
Henry Courteney my Lord Edward and 



NOVEMBER, 1502. (J3 

my Lady Margret their suster twoo 
women servauntes and a grome from the 
last day of May unto the xiij* day of 
July that is to wit for vj wekes at xiij s. 
iiij d. the weke . . . iijj ft. 

Itm to the same Dame Margret Cotton for 
the diettes of my Lord Henry Courteney 
and my Lady Margret his suster twoo 
women servauntes and a grome from the 
xiij* day of July unto the i)* 8 day of 
Novembre that is to wit for xvj wekes at 
ix s. the weke . . . vij li. 

Itm the same day to S r Raaf Verney Knight 
for money by him geven in rewarde to 
a man that brought a buk to the Queue 
to Langley . . xx d. 

Itm the same day to Laurance Travice for 
his costes going upon certain messages at 
divers tymes for the Lord Henry Cour- 
teney and the Lady Margret his suster 
from Havering to London and to the 
Courte xvj d. and to the same Laurance 
for an axe by him bought x d. SnV . ij s. ij d. 

Itm the xvj th day of Novembre to Maulde 
Hainond for keping of hur childe geven 
to the Quene for half a yere ended at 
Mighelmas last past . viij s. 

Itin the same day to the Quenes purs by the 

handes of Richard Justice . . xl s. 

p Sm 8 pag. C lij li. xvj s. iij d. 



64 NOVEMBER, 1502. 

Itin the xvij th day of Novembre to Lybart 
goldsmyth for contentacon of a bille 
signed with thande of the Queue for 
certain parcelles of stuf of his occupacon 
by him delivered to the Quenes grace 
as appereth by the same bill . xix li. vij s. j d. 

Itfii the same day to Agnes Dean the Quenes 
launder for hure horsmete from Berkeley 
Herons to Windesore by the space of xl 
dayes at iiij d. the daye . . xiij s. iiij d. 

Itin the xxiij u day of Novembre to Henry 
Wurley of London goldsmyth in partie 
of payement of a warrant and billes signed 
with thandes of the Quenes grace con- 
teignyng the somme of CC x li. xix s. 
viij d. due unto him for certain stuf of 
his occupacon by him delivered to th'use 
of the Quenes said grace . . Ix li. 

Itin the same day to Thomas Goodriche of 
London mercer for thre score yerdes of 
blewe velvet at x s. vj d. the yerd by 
him delivered to the Quenes use . xxxj li. x s. 

Itin the same day to a servaunt of S r Gil- 
bertes Talbottes in rewarde for bringing 
a wylde bore to the Quene . x s. 

Itin the same day to William Shadde in re- 
warde for bringing a present of trypes to 
the Quene to Baynardes Castell . iij s. iiij d. 

Itin to a servaunt of Maistres Davys in rewarde 
for bringing a present of podynges and 
chynes of porke to the Quene to Bay- 
nardes Castelle . . . ij s. 

Itin the xxiiij u day of Novembre to the Dean 
of the Kinges Chapejl for thoffringes of 



NOVEMBER, 1502. 65 

the Quene upon the Feestes of Mary 
Magdalene Saint James Saint Anne 
Saint Lawrance Thassumpcon of our 
Lady Saint Bartholomewe the Nativite 
of our Lady Thexaltacon of the Holy 
Crosse Saint Mathewe Saint Mighell 
Saint Edward and Saint Luke that is to 
wit for every of the said Feestes v s. Sin* Ix 2. 

' Sm a pag. Cxv li. v s. ix d. 



Itih the same day to John Warreyn for 
making of a trussing bedde seler testere 
and couutrepoynt of crymsyn velvet and 
blewe paned and for making of the cur- 
teyns of dammaske crymsyn and blewe 
paned according to the same xxx s. 
iiij d. Itin for fynne lyere of red thred 
xx d. and for grete rynges to the same 
curteyns xvj d. Sm a . . xxxiij s. iiij d. 

Itin to the same John Warreyn of London 
bedmaker for making of a pyle cloth 
of lynen cloth vj yerdes long and ij 
yerdes brode and curteyns according to 
the same x s. Itm for lyere of fynne 
pakthred to the same xij d. Itin for 
lyere of fynne white thred for the cur- 
teyns of the same pyle cloth iiij d. Itin 
for xl latyn rynges to the same curteyns 
iiij d. Itin for iiij lb. dl of white frynge 
of white thred at xvj d. the lb. vj s. Itin 
K 



(>(> NOVEMBER, 1502. 

for making a cloth of estate of crimsyn 
riche cloth of tissue iiij yerdes depe and 
iij yerdes brode the seler ij yerdes dl and 
the quarter long the valance j quarter dl 
depe according to the same xxvj s. viij d. 
and for fynne Iyer of red thred to the 
same ij s. Sfn a . . . xlvj s. iiij d. 

Itiri the same day to John Vandelf and 
Alexandre Hove goldsmythes in fulle 
conteutacon and payement of a bill 
signed with thande of the Quenes grace 
for certain parcelles of stuf of thaire 
occupacon by theim delivered to the 
Quenes said grace against the mariage 
of my Lord Prince decessed as it ap- 
pereth by the same bille . . xlvij li. 

Itm the xxv u day of Novembre to Thomas 
Humberston hosyer for the cloth and 
making of vij payere sokkes for the 
Quenes grace at vj d. the payere . iij s. vj d. 

4> z Sin* pag. Ij li. iij s. ij d. 



Itm the same day for thre yerdes of blake 
sattyn geven to John Myklowe clerc of 
comptrolment of the Kinges houshold 
by the Quenes grace at vj s. viij d. the 
yerd . . . .^v , xx s. 

I tin the same day to John Duffyn for his 
costes ryding from Berkeley Herons to 
Pevesham and Blakemore to the Lord 



NOVEMBER, 1502. 67 

Saintmond from thens to the parke of 
Cosham from Cosham to the Devyes 
from thens to the forest of Savernake to 
S r John Seymer for bukkes for the Kinges 
grace and from thens to Fayreford by the 
space of viij dayes at x d. the daye . vi s. viij d. 

Itin to the same John for his costes ryding 
from Langley to Savernake for certain 
bukkes left behynde by the space of iiij 
dayes at x d. the day . . iij s. iiij d. 

Itin the same day to William Boterey of 
London mercer in partye of payement 
of a bille signed with the hande of the 
Quenes grace conteignying the somme of 
vij" poundes vj d. for certain silkes by 
him delivered to the Quenes said grace 
as by the same bille it appereth . xl li. 

Itin the same day to Maister Payne the 
Quenes aulmoigner for money by him 
dault in almous from Langley to Berke- 
ley Herons xvij s. viij d. Itin to an 
ancoresse at Gloucestre xx d. Itin for 
thoff'ring of the Queue to the Roode 
beyond Gloucestre xij d. and to a fote- 
man for money by him leyed out by the 
Quenes commaundement xij d. Sm a . xxj s. iiij d. 

Itin the same day to my Lady Bray for 
money by hure geven in reward to a 
chapellain of the Bisshop of Murreys 
xl s. and to a poure rnau that was 
somtyme servaunt to King Edward in 
almous vj s. viij d. Sin' . xlvj s. viij il. 

* Sin* pag. xliiij li. xviij s. iij d. 

AT2 



68 NOVEMBER, 1502. 

Itin the xxvj u day of Novembre to Richard 
Justice page of the robys for his costes 
going from Westminster to London in 
the nyght for a gowne of blewe velvet 
for the Quene and for his bote hyere 
viij d. Itm for conveyeng alle the 
Quenes lyned govvnys from Westminster 
to London by water and for mens 
labour that bare the same gownys to 
the water and from the water v d. Itin 
for bringing the Quenes furred gownys 
from London to Westminster and for 
mens labours that bare the same to and 
from the water v d. Itm for his costes 
from Westminster to London to take 
the remaynes of suche stuf as remaineth 
there iiij d. Itm for going from West- 
minster to London for vij yerdes quarter 
di of blake damaske and for a frontlet 
of golde for the Quene iiij d. and for 
making a newe key to a grete standard 
being in the warderobe of the robys and 
for mending of boeth lokkes to the same 
vj d. Srh a . > if' . ij s. viij d. 

Itm the same day to Henry Bryan for xvij 
yerdes of blake velvet for a gowne for 
the Quene at x s. vj d. the yerde viij li. 
xviij s. vj d. Itin for xiij yerdes of blake 
Batten delivered to Johnson for a riding 
gowne for the Quene at ix s. the yerde 
C xvij s. Itin for a yerde di quarter of 
blake velvet for an edge and cuffes for 
the same gowne at xj s. vj d. the yerde 
xiij s. Itin for vij yerdes di of blake 



NOVEMBER, 1502. Qg 

bokeram for lynyng of the same gowne 
at ix d. the yerd v s. vij d. ob. Itin for 
a nayle of sarcenet for fentes for the 
same gowne iiij d. and for an elle 
quarter of canvas for lynyng of the 
same gowne vj d. Sm a . xv li. xiiij s. xj d. ob. 

<p r Sin* pag. xv li. xvij s. vij d. ob. 



Itin the same day to a Frenche woman in 
rewarde that came to the Queue to 
Baynardes Castelle to have been hure 
norice . . . vj s. viij d. 

Itin the xxvij u day of Novembre to Robert 
Machene taillour for making of the 
covering of a lytter of blewe velvet 
lyned with sarcenet and bordered with 
sattyn fygure that was geven to a lady of 
Spayne vj s. viij d. Itin for making of 
iiij quysshens of blewe dammaske for the 
same lytter ij s. Itin for making of a 
gowne of sattyn fygure lyned with yelowe 
sattyn of Bruges for the grete Flemyng 
called Anne v s. Itin for making of twoo 
dublettes of tawny dammaske for the 
quenes fotemen at Warwike iiij s. Itin 
for making of twoo gownes of tawny for 
the same fotemen ij s. Itin for making 
of twoo dublettes of yelowe sattyn of 
Bruges for the said fotemen iij s. iiij d. 
Itin for making of a gowne of blake 



70 NOVEMBER, 1502. 

dammaske lyned with sarcenet for the 
yong Lord Henry Courteney ij s. Itm 
for making of a gowne of tawny medley 
bordred with sarcenet for the same Lord 
xij d. Itin for making of a cote of 
murrey chainlet for the same Lord ij s. 
Itin for making of a peticote for the 
same Lord vj d. Itin for making of a 
cote of murrey chamlet for my Lord his 
broder and a cote of blakc dammaske 
iiij s. Itin for making of a peticote for 
the same Lord vj d. and for making of 
twoo gownys for the forsaid fotemen at 
London ij s. Sin* . . xxxv s. 

Itih the xxviij" day of Novembre to Nicholas 
Mathewe yeoman of the Quencs chambre 
in reward towardes his charges whan he 
was hurte by the servauntes of S r William 
Sandes . . . xxvjs. viijd. 

Itin the same day to my Lady Anne Percy 
for xiij elles iij quarter di of fyne lynon 
cloth by hure bought for the Queues 
use at iij s. viij d. the elle . . 1 s. x d. ob. 

p r Sin* pag. Cxix s. ij d. ob. 



Itin the same day to Robert Alyn for his 
costes prepayring logging for the Quene 
from Westminster to Grenewiche by 
the space of twoo dayes at xij d. the 
daye ij s. Itm to Thomas Holden yeo- 



NOVEMBER, j 502. 7t 

man for twoo dayes ij s. to John Duffy n 
grome for twoo dayes at x d. the day 
xx d. Itin to George Hamerton grome 
porter for oon day x d. Itin to Henry 
Roper page of the Queues beddes for 
ij dayes at viij d. the day xvj d. and to 
Edmond Calverd page for oon day viij d. 
Itin to the said Robert Alyn for his 
costes prepayring logging for the Queue 
from Grenewiche to Baynardes Castelle 
by the space of a day xij d. Itin to 
George Hamerton grome porter for oon 
day xd. Itin to Edmond Calverd page 
for oon day viij d. and to the said Robert 
Alyn for a lokke by him bought at Bay- 
nardes Castelle vij d. Sm a . . xj s. vij d. 
Itin the same day to Arnolde Chollerton 
yeoman huisshere of the Queues Cham- 
bre for his costes prepayring logging for 
the Quene for Abyndon to Ewelme by 
the space of a day xij d. Itin to Edmond 
Burton yeoman for oon day xij d. Itin 
to John Duffyn grome for oone day xd. 
Itin to Henry Roper page for oon day 
viij d. Itin to John Bright page for 
oon day viij d. Itin to the same Arnold 
for his costes prepayring logging for the 
Quene from Ewelme to Henley for oon 
day xij d. It to Edmond Burton 
yeoman for a day xij d. Itin to George 
Hamerton grome porter for oon day 
x d. Itin to John Duffyn grome for a 
day x d. Itin to Henry Roper page for 
oon day viij d. Itin to John Bright 



72 NOVEMBER, 1502. 

page for a day viij d. I tin to the said 
Arnold for prepayring logging for the 
Quene from Henley to Esthampsted for 
a day xij d. Itin to Edmond Burton 
yeoman for oon day xij d. Itin to 
George Hamerton grome porter for a 
day x d. It to John Duffyn grome 
for a day x d. Itin to Henry Roper 
page for oon daye viij d. and to John 
Bright page for a day viij d. Sin* . xiij s. ij d. 

|> r Sm* pag. xxv s. ix d. 



Itm the last day of Novembre to the said 
Arnolde Chollerton for his costes pre- 
payring logging for the Quene from Est- 
hampsted to Windesore by the space of 
twoo dayes at xij d. the day ij s. Itin to 
Edmond Burton yeoman for twoo dayes 
ij s. Itm to John Duffyn grome for twoo 
dayes at x d. the day xx d. Itm to Henry 
Roper page for twoo dayes at viij d. the 
day xvj d. and to John Bright page for 
twoo dayes xvj d. Itin to the same Ar- 
nolde for his costes prepayring logging 
for the Quene from Windesore to Riche- 
mount for twoo dayes ij s. Itm to 
Edmund Burton yeoman for twoo dayes 
ij s. Itin to John Duffyn grome for ij 
dayes xxd. Itm to Henry Roper page 
of the beddes for twoo dayes xvj d. and 



NOVEMBER, 1502. 73 

to John Bright page for twoo dayes 
xvj d. Sin a . . xv j s. viij d. 

Itiii the same day to Lewes Waltier barge- 
man for conveying the Queue and hure 
Ladys in hure barge and grete bote with 
xxiij rowers the xiiij* day of Novembre 
from Westminstre to Grenewiche every 
rower taking viij d. sm a xv s. iiij d. and 
the maister xvj d. Itin the rewarde of 
the barge and grete bote above the 
brigge ij s. Itin to the same Lewes for 
conveyeng the Queue in hure barge the 
xix th day of Novembre from Grenewiche 
to Baynardes Castelle with xx li rowers 
every rower taking viij d. xiij s. iiij d. 
and the maister xvj d. Itin to the said 
Lewes for conveyeng the Queues grace 
the xxvj" day of Novembre from Bay- 
nardes Castell to Westminstre in hure 
barge with xvj rowers every rower taking 
iiij d. v s. iiij d. the maister xvj d. Itiii 
for conveyeng the Quenes Gentilwomen 
and hur servauntes in a grete bote from 
Baynardes Castelle to Westminster with 
vj rowers every rower taking iiij d. ij s. 
and the maister of the bote viij d. Itin 
the rewarde of the same bote xij d. Sm a xliij s. viij d. 

,p r Sm a pag. lx s. iiij d. 



74 DECEMBER, 1502. 

Itm the same day to Pache in rewarde for 
bringing a present of poyngarnettes and 
apulles to the Quene . . iij 1. iiij d. 

Itm delivered to George Hamerton grome 
porter for money by him payed by the 
Quenes commaundement at Baynardes 
Castell for twoo quartred bourdes with 
vysys at vj s. the pece . . xij s. 

Itm the same day to John Browne for his 
costes wayting upon the Quenes plate 
from Woodstok to Langley for oon day 
x d. Itm to the same John for his costes 
going before from Woodstok to Abyndon 
with stuf of the Warderobe and making 
herbigage there by the space of iiij dayes 
at x d. the day iij s. iiij d. and to the same 
John for his costes going before with the 
same stuf from Abyndon to Windesore 
by the space of iij dayes at x d. the day 
ij s. vj d. Sm a . . . vj s. viij d. 

Itin the furst day of Decembre to Richard 
Smyth yeoman of the Quenes robya for 
Cv yerdes dt of cloth at iiij s. iiij d. the 
yerde whiche was geven to divers per- 
sonnes by the Quenes commaundement 
in the yere last passed as in the boke of 
the Warderobe it appereth . . xxij li. xv s. 

Itin to the same Richard Smyth for Cxj 
yerdes of cloth for xxxvij poure women 
for the Quenes Maundye in the yere 
last passed every woman iij yerdes at 
ij s. viij d. the yerd xiiij li. xvj s. and 
for iij yerdes di of cloth delivered by 
the commaundement of the Quene to a 



DECEMBER, 1502. 75 

woman that was norice to the Prince 
brothere to the Qnenes grace and iij 
yerdes to the suster of S r Rogier Cotton 
at ij s. viij d. xvij s. iiij d. Sin* xvli. xiij s. iiij d. 

Itm to the same Richard Smyth for viij yerdes 
iij quarter of blake velvet price the yerd 
xs. Sm a . . iiij li. vijs. vj d. 

r Sm a pag. xliij li. xvij s. x d. 



Itm to the said Richard Smyth for certain 
money by him leyed out by the com- 
maundement of the Quene aswele for 
apparelling of the fotemen as for divers 
othere necessaryes as by a bill signed 
with thande of the Quenes grace and 
registred in the boke of the Warderobe 
more plainly appereth . xj li. ijs. iijd. 

Itih to the same Richard Smyth for certain 
money by him payed for certain cloth 
silkes brusshis and othere necessaries by 
him bought by the commaundement of 
the Quene as by a bill signed with 
thande of hure grace and registred in 
the boke of the Warderobe more plainly 
appereth *iijli. 

Itin the ij 46 day of Decembre to dame Mar- 
grette Cotton for money by hure payed 
for hosyn shoys laces sope and othere 
necessaryes for the lordes Henry Cour- 
L 2 



76 DECEMBER, 1502. 

teney Edward and the lady Margret 

their suste re . . xxxvij s. vjd. 

Itfii to the same dame Margrette Cotton for 
the dyettes of Edward Pallet for half a 
yere ended at the Feest of Thassumpcon 
of our lady last past xx s. Itm for iiij 
yerdes of fustyan for a cote for the same 
Edward at vij d. ob. the yerde ij s. vj d. 
Itm for making of the same cote viij d. 
Itm for twoo shirtes for the same Edward 
xvij d. Itm for iiij payre of shoys xvj 
Itm for iiij payre hose at iij d. the payre 
xij d. and for the scole hyer of the same 
Edward by the space of iij quarters of a 
yere every quarter viij d. ij s Sm a . xxviij s. xj d. 

Itm to the same dame Margrette Cotton for 
the diettes of my Lord Henry Courteney 
and my Lady Margret his sustere twoo 
women servauntes and a grome from the 
ij de day of Novembre unto the last day 
of the same moneth that is to wit for iiij 
wekes at ix s. the weke }'** . xxxvj s. 

,p r Sm a pag. xxv ti. iij s. 



Itm the iij de day of Decembre to the Quenes 

purs at Westminstre . . xl s. 

Itm payed to John Heron for th'use of the 
Kinges grace assigned upon the Quenes 
landes this yere . CCCxxxiij li. vj s. viij d. 

Itm to the Bisshop of the Kinges Chappelle 

on Saint Nicholas even at Westminster xl s. 



DECEMBER, 1502. 77 

I tin for thoffring of the Quene on Saint 

Nicholas Day . . .vs. 

Itin for thoffring of the Quene upon Saint 

Andrewes day . . .vs. 

Itiii the vy* day of Decembre to Maistres 
Cheyne for candelstykkes cuppebourde 
clothes and othere necessaryes by hure 
bought for the chambre of the Lord 
Henry Courteney and the Lady Mar- 
gret his suster . vjs. viijd. 

Itin the same day to John Staunton the 
yonger for money by him layed out for 
horsemete and for thexpenses of certain 
personnes that brought the Lord Henry 
Courteney and the Lady Margret his 
suster from S r John Hosys place in 
Essex unto London v s. vj d. and to the 
same John for his costes by space of 
twoo dayes at x d. the day xx d. SnY . vij s. ij d. 

Itin the viij* day of Decembre to John Staun- 
ton thelder for money by him lent to the 
Quene at Westminstre . xvs. iiijd. 

Itin for thoffring of the Quene to oure Lady 
of Pyewe upon thevyn of the Concepcon 
of our Lady V J~ S - vii J d ' 

Itin for thoffring of the Quene upon the day 

of the Concepcon of oure Lady 
ItintothebretherhedofSaintUrselainLondon iijs. iiijd. 

Itih the ix* day of Decembre to Henry Langton 

olde servaunt of King Edwardes . iij s. mj d. 



an 



SnY pag. CCCxlli. iiij s. ij d. 



78 DECEMBER, 1502. 

Itm the same day to Robert Machene taillour 
for making of iiij coots of white and 
grene sarcenet for iiij of the Kinges 
mynstrelles against the dysguysing in 
the yere last passed at ij s. the cote viij s. 
Itm for making of iiij cootes of white 
and grene sarcenet for iiij of the Kinges 
trumpettes at ij s. the cote viijs. And 
for making of thre cotes of sarcenet for 
iij mynstrelles oon of my Lord Princes 
an othere of my Lord of Yorkes and the 
iij de of the Duk of Bukkingham at ij s. 
the cote vjs. Srri a . . xxijs. 

Itui to a man of Poynfreyt sayeng himself to 
lodge in his house Therl Ryvers in tyme 
of his deth in almous . . xij d. 

Itm delivered to Brice yeoman cooke for the 
Quenes mouth for chekyns and larkes 
by him bought for the Quene against 
hure comyng to Baynardes Castelle and 
soo to the Towre . . ij s. viij d. 

Itm the xiij" 1 day of Decembre to the Quenes 
purs at the Towre by thandes of my Lady 
Anne Percy . . . Iiij s. iiij d. 

Itm the same day to my Lady Anne Percy 
for money by hure payed for xxvj elles 
of lynon cloth at xviij d. the elle . xxxix s. 

Itm for thoffring of the Quene to oure Lady 
of Pyewe at hure departing from West- 
minstre to the Towre . . vj s. viij d. 

Itrn to a monke that brought our Lady 

gyrdelle to the Quene in rewarde . vj s. viij d. 

Itm to the gromes and pages of the Quenes 

chambre in reward against Cristmas . xx fi. 



DECEMBER, 1502. 79 

I tin to Lawrance Travice for cariage of cer- 
tain stuf belonging to the Lord Henry 
Courteney and the Lady Margret his 
suster from Havering at Bower to London ij. s. viij d. 

j) r Sm a pag. xx vj li. xiiij s. 



Itm to my Lady Anne in fulle contentacon 
of x markes due unto hure for a yere 
ended at Mighelmas last passed 

Itm the XV th day of Decembre to John Rey- 
nolde for money by him payed to a man 
that broke a yong hors of the Quenes at 
Mortymer by the space of v wekes every 
weke ij s. sm a x s. Itin for marking of the 
Quenes coltes at Havering xij d. Itin for 
the marking of the Quenes coltes at Fod- 
ringhey xij d. Itin for dryving of the 
yong horses from Havering to Mortymer 
by the space of v dayes and for a mans 
costes with his hors by the same space 
at x d. the day iiij s. ij d. Itin for 
dryving of vj yong horses to Mortymer 
for twoo tymes bayting and oon nyght 
xij d. Itm to the said John and Parker 
for thexpenses of thaire twoo horses ij 
dayes and oon nyght x d. Itm for 
shoing of the same twoo horses ij d. 
Itin for casting of a donge hille at the 
Quenes stable at Ham ij s. Sm a . xx s. ij d. 

Itm the same day for brede and ale at Bay- 
nardes Castell at the Quenes departing 



80 DECEMBER, 1502. 

from Westminstre to the Towre xij d. 

and for faggottes iiij d. Sin* . xvj d. 

Itin the xvij 01 day of Decembre to William 
Lewes gentilman of Thewry for a lokke 
by him bought and sette upon Thewry 
doore at Baynardes Castell . iiij d. 

Itin the same day to S r John Grigge for 
money by him payed to certain brikke- 
leyers labourers and carpinters for thaire 
wages and for brikke lyme sande and 
naylles by him bought at divers tymes 
for the reparacon of Baynardes Castell 
as appereth by a bille signed with thande 
of the Queue . . vj ti. vij s. vj d. 

Itin the same day to the Quenes purs by the 

handes of my Lady Elisabeth Stafford . xl s. 

j? r Sin a pag. ix li. ix s. iiij d. 



Itin the xvij th day of Decembre to James 
Nataresse for his costes ryding from 
Westminstre to Newbury for Jaques 
Hault by the Quenes commaundement 
by the space of iiij dayes at xij d. the daye iiij s. 

Itin the xix* day of Decembre to Cristofre 
Ascue for Ixxvj elles di of lynnyn cloth 
at ix d. the elle Ivij s. iiij d. ob. and for 
Ixxiij elles iiij quarter of lynnyn cloth at 
viij d. the elle xlix s. ij d. for bering 



DECEMBER, 1502. 81 

shetes trussing sheetes and sheetes for the 
stoele a presse sheete oon payre of fote 
sheetes and for shyrtes for the fotemen 
and the Quenes Foele , Cvj s. vj d. ob. 

Itin the same day to William Fowler of Lon- 
don dyer for dyeng of CClxxij yerdes of 
wardemole blewe and murrey for the 
Quenes barge at iij d. the yerd . Ixvj s. 

Itm the same day to William Hamerton yeo- 
man of the Quenes beddes for money by 
him layed out at divers tymes by the 
Quenes commaundement as by a bille 
signed with thande of hur grace more 
largely appereth . . . Ij s. viij d. 

Itin the xxiij" day of Decembre to a servaunt 
of S r John Seymours in rewarde for 
bringing of fyve does to the Quene at 
Richemount J|- . . vj s. viij d. 

Itm the xxiiij a day of Decembre to Thomas 
Barton and Richard Chollerton the 
Quenes fotemen for thaire dryeng money 
iourneyeng with the Quenes said grace 
for a yere ended at Cristmas last past . xij s. iiij d. 

Itm the same day for iiij bonne ttes for the 

Quenes said fotemen . v s. 

Itm for thoffring of the Quene to the roode 
at the north doore of Polles iij s. viij d. 
and to our Lady of grace there iij s. 
viij d. Sm. . vi J s- "U d - 

,p r Sm a pag. xij li. xix s. vj d. ob. 



M 



82 DECEMBER, 1502. 

Itin the xxv" day of Decembre to Robynet 
the Queues brawderer for money by him 
payed to certain personnes werking upon 
the riche bedde aswele for theire wages 
as for thaire bourde wages, Furst to oon 
Anthony for xlj dayes ended at Cristmas 
at iiij d. the day xiij s. viij d. Itin to 
the same Anthony for his bourde wages 
by the space of vij wekes and iij dayes at 
xvj d. the weke x s. Itih to oon William 
for xlj dayes at iiij d. the day 
xiij s. viij d. I tin to the same William 
for his bourde wages by the space of vij 
wekes and iij dayes at xvj d. the weke 
x s. Itin to oon James for his 

wages by the space of vij wekes and iij 
dayes at xvj d. the weke x s. Itin the 
same James for his bourde wages by the 
said space x s. Itin to oon Jofine 
for hur wages by the space of v wekes at 
xvj d. the weke vj s. viij d. Itin to the 
same Jomie for hure bourde wages by 
the said space of v wekes vj s. viij d. 
Itin to Margrette Stokes for hure wages 
by the space of twoo wekes and hure 
bourde wages v s. iiij d. Itin to Jofine 
Pote for hur wages and bourde wages 
by the space of twoo wekes v s. iiij d. 
Itin to John Bolok for vj dayes werke 
upon the awter clothes ij s. and for his 
bourde wages by the same space xvj d. 
Itin to the said Robynet for hys bourde 
wages by the space of vij wekes and iij 
dayes at xvj d. the weke x s. Itin for 



DECEMBER, 1502. 83 

candelles by the space of vij weks and iij 
dayes v s. Itin for searing candelles for 
the awter clothys ij d. Itin for blake 
crewle to purfulle the rosys vj d. Itin 
for searing candelles for the white and 
red rosys and clowdes v d. Itin for colys 
for the wurkers by the space of vij wekes 
ij s. and for tawny thred for to leye the 
werke upon thegge of red sattyn iiij d. 
Sm a tot. . . . C xiij s. j d. 

<p r Sin" pag. Cxiij s. j d. 



Itin to Cornishe for setting of a carralle upon 

Cristmas day in reward . . xiij s. iiij d. 

Itin to a servaunt of my Lord the Kinges 
Chambrelain for bringing vj does to the 
Quene to Richemount . . vj s. viij d. 

Itin for thoffering of the Quene upon Crist- 
mas day v s. and for hure howselle the 
same day xx d. Sm a . vj s. viij d. 

Itin to the children of the Kinges Chapelle in 
rewarde to theim geven upon Cristmas 
day xiij s. iiij d. - xii J ~ s - "U d ' 

Itrn for thoffring of the Quene upon the 
Festes of Saint Stephen Saint John 
Childremas day and Saint Thomas in 
Cristmas weke 

Itin delivered to Doctour Uttoune for the 
Queries offringes to Saint Thomas at 
Canterbury iij s. iiij d. to our Lady of 



84 DECEMBER, 1502. 

Undrecroft there iij s. iiij d. to Saint 
Adrean ij s. vj d. and to Saint Augustyn 
ij s. vj d. Sin*. . . xj s. viij d. 

Itm to the Quenes grace upon the Feest of 
Saint Stephen for hure disporte at cardes 
this Cristmas . . . C s. 

Itm to Richard Weston for certain harnesses 
of gyrdelles by him bought for the 
Quene beyond the see . . iiij li. x s. 

Itm to George Colbronde for twoo galons of 
Rynysshe wyne by him bought for the 
Quene twoo wycre bottelles and for his 
costes by the space of a day going for 
the said wyne . . .iij s. 

Itm to my Lady Verney for money by hure 
geven in reward by the Quenes com- 
maundement to Victour Courteney late 
page of the Quenes ehambre . vj s. viij d. 

I tin to the keper of the parke of Odiham for 
bringing of ten does to the Quene to 
Richemounte on newe yeres even last 
passed . . . x s. 

Itm for thoffring of the Quene on Saint 

Thomas day before Cristmas : ' % '. v s. 

,p r Sm a pag. xiiij li. vj s. iiij d. 



JANUARY, 1503. 85 

I tin to Lewis Waltier bargeman conveyeng 
the Queries grace in hure barge the xij 01 
day of Decembre from Westminster to 
the Towre with xviij rowers every rower 
taking vj d. ix s. Itin to the maister 
xvj d. Itin the rewarde of the barge 
beneth the brigge xvj d. Itm to the 
same Lewes conveyeng the Quenes grace 
in hur barge the xxj day of Decembre 
with xxiij" rowers from the Towre to 
Mortelake every rower taking viij d. xv s. 
iiij d. and the maister xvj d. Itm the 
rewarde of the barge beneth the brigge 
xvj d. and to the said Lewes and rowers 
for a reward to theim geven by the 
Quenes grace vj s. viij d. Sin 8 . xxxvj s. iiij d. 

Itin to the Quenes grace for money to bee 

dault in almous upon newe yeres evyn Ix s. 

Itin for the Quenes offring on Newe Yeres 

day . . .vs. 

Itin the ij de day of January to Rutte the 
Quenes cordener for shoys and buskyns 
by him delivered to the Quenes use from 
the xviij 111 day of Fevere anno xvij unto 
the xij 01 day of Decembre anno xviij as 
herafter followeth. Furst for xij payre 
of single soled shoes with latyn bucles 
at xij d. the payre xij s. Itin for xxxvij 
payre shoes for xxxvij" poure women at 
the Quenes Maundy at v d. the payre 
xv s. v d. Itin for xx" payre shoys for 
the Quenes fotemen at hure departing 
into Walys at vj d. the payre x s. Itin 
for vj payre of dobled soled shoys with 



86 JANUARY, 1503. 

kitten bukcles for the Queues awn use at 
xij d. the payre vj s. I tin for twoo payre 
of buskins for the Queues grace at hure 
departing unto Walys at iiij s. the payre 
viij s. Itm for a payre of buskins for 
the Duchesse of Suffolk iiij s. Itm for 
xij payre of shoys for the Quenes fote- 
men at vj d. the payre vj s. and for twoo 
payre of buskins for the Quenes awne 
use against Cristmas at iiij s. the payre 
viij s. Sm a . . . Ixix s. v d. 

,p r Sin" pag. viij li. x s. ix d. 



Itm the same day to a servant of Therl of 
Devon in rewarde by the Quenes com- 
maundement . . . vj s. viij d. 

Itm the same day for the cariage of xj does 
from the grete parke of Paste rn to Lon- 
don . pifan ot < XV J ^* 

Itin the same day to a servaunt of John Wal- 
lers in reward for bringing a goshawke to 
the Quene . f*. ;'^ x s. 

Itin to the Quene of Scottes mynstrelles in 

reward by the Quenes commaundement x s. 

Itm the iiij th day of January to the fraternitie 
of Saint Clementes without Temple 
Barre , .- . . . iij s. iiij d. 

Itin to Robynet brawderer for his howse rent 
by the space of iij quarter of a yere 
ended at Cristmas last passed . xxx s. 



JANUARY, 1503. 8? 

Itm for thoffring of the Queue upon the 
Feest of Saiut Edward the king and 
confessour at Richemount . v s. 

Itm to William Tyler desare late servaunt to 

Therl of Oxonford in reward . vj s. viij d. 

Itm the V th day of January to Thomas Wood- 
note and John Felde gromes of the 
Quenes chambre for thaire costes attend- 
ing upon the Quenesjouelx from Westm 
to Grenewiche by the space of a day 
eithere of theim at vj d. the day xij d. 
Itm from Grenewiche to Baynardes 
Castelle by the space of a day eithere of 
theim at vj d. the day xij d. Itm from 
Baynardes Castelle to Westm and from 
Westm to the Towre by the space of a 
day xij d. and from the Towre by the 
space of a day to Richemounte xij d. iiij s. 

Itiii the same day to a servaunt of Morgan 
Kydwelles that brought a present of 
chesys to the Quene to Rechemount in 
reward . . . iij s. iiij d. 

Itm the same clay to Fraunceys a purcevaunt 
belonging to my lord the Kinges Cham- 
brelain in reward for bringing a present 
of oranges coynfaytes and othere thinges 
to the Quene . x s - 

,p r SnY pag. C v s. 



88 JANUARY, 1503. 

Itm the same day to William Gentilman page 
of the Quenes chambre for his costes 
caryeng twoo bukkes the xx" day of Juyn 
from Windesore to London to William 
Bulstrowde by the Quenes commaunde- 
ment by the space of twoo dayes atviij d. 
the day xvj d. and for horshyre by the 
same space xij d. Itm to the same 
William for caryeng of twoo bukkes from 
Windesore to London the xxiiij u day of 
the said moneth oon to the Duchesse of 
Suff. and the othere to John Vandelf and 
Lybart goldsmythes by the space of ij 
dayes at viij d. the daye xvj d. and for 
hors hyre by the same space xij d. Itm 
to the said William for his costes going 
before from Grenewiche to Baynardes 
Castelle the xix* day of Novembre 
prepayring logging for the Quene by the 
space of a day viij d. Sm a . v s. iiij d. 

Itin for thoffring of the Quene upon twelf 

day . . ,.' v s. 

Itm the vj* day of January to Richard Bul- 
lok surgion for medicynes by him 
minstred upon the Lord Henry Courte- 
ney . . . . x s. 

Itin the vij* day of January to Thomas Wood- 
note for thexpenses of the Quenes grey- 
houndes for the monethes of Octobre 
Novembre and Decembre that is to wit 
for iiij" xij dayes at ij d. the day . xv s. iiij d. 

Itm to Maistres Denton for money by hure 
payed to John Hayward skynner for 



JANUARY, 1503. 

furring of a gown of crymsyn velvet for 
the Quene of Scottes and for two skynnes 
of pampelyon for the cuffes of the same 
gowne vj s. Itm for half a furre of 
shankes for the perfourmyng of the 
same gown vj s. and for iiij tavelyns of 
shankes for the coler and fent of the 
said gowne ij s. . 

Itin the xiiij" 1 day of January to a servant of 
the Pryour of Lanthony in reward for 
brynging of two bakyn laumpreys to the 
Quene 



Sm a pag. liiij s. viij d. 



vs. 



Itm the xvij* day of January to the Quenes 

purs by thandes of my Lady Kateryn . Ixvj s. viij d. 

Itin the xviij* day of January to a servaunt 
of Thabbasse of Syon in reward for 
bringing a present to the Quene . iij s. iiij d. 

Itin the xix^ day of January to a servaunt of 
S r Edward Darrelles in rewarde for 
bringing of a courser to the Quene . x s. 

Itm the xx u day of January to a mayde that 
came out of Spayne and daunsed before 
the Quene in rewarde . . Iiij s. iiij d. 

Itm the same day to James Notarice for his 
costes riding from Richemount into 
Bukkes Shire by the Quenes com- 
maundement . . iiij s. 



90 JANUARY, 1503. 

Itm for gifts geven upon newe yeres day Furst 

to Piers Barboure . ;. x s. 

Itm to James Braybroke . . vj s. viij d. 

Itm to the Kinges Wacche . . xx s. 

Itm to the Kinges Hexmen . . xiij s. iiij d. 

Itm to the Herauldes at Armes . xl s. 

Itin to Thewry . . xx s. 

Itin to the WafFry , . . . vj s. viij d. 

Itin to Thomas Hunt of the Confeccionary . x s. 

Itin to the Mynystres of the Kinges Chapell xl s. 

Itin to a servaunt of the Bisshop of Bathe for 

bringing a newe yeres gift to the Queue xxvj s. viij d. 

Itm to a servaunt of the Bisshop of Excestre 

for bringing a new yeres gift to the Quene xxvjs. viij d. 

Itin to a servaunt of Tharchebisshop of Can- 
terbury for bringing a Newe Yeres gift 

to the Quene . , . xl s. 

Itm to a servaunt of the Bisshop of Ely for 

bringing a Newe Yeres gift to the Quene Iiij s. iiij d. 

Itm to a servaunt of Tharchebisshop of York for 

bringing a Newe Yeres gift to the Quene xxvj s. viij d. 

r Sm" pag. xxiij li. xvij s. iiij d. 



Itin to a servaunt of the Bisshop of Win- 
chestre for bringing a Newe Yeres gift 
to the Quene . . . xxvjs. viij d. 

Itin to a servaunt of the Bisshop of Saresbury 
for bringing a Newe Yeres gift to the 
Quene -. .r . . xxvj s. viij d. 

Itin to a servaunt of the Bisshop of Norwiche 
for bringing a Newe Yeres gyft to the 
Quene . xx s. 



FEBRUARY, 1503. 91 

Itin to Bygot servaunt to my Lady the Kinges 
moder for bringing a Newe Yeres gift to 
the Quene . . . Ixvj s. viijd. 

Itin to my Lady Verney for money by hure 
geven to a servaunt of the Bisshop of 
Carlill for bringing a Newe Yeres gift 
to the Quene . . xxvj s. viij d. 

Itm to the Kinges mynstrelles with the shal- 

mewes . . xl s. 

Itin to the Quenes mynstrells . . xxvj s. viijd. 

Itm to John Whiting gentilman huissher of 

the chambre with the Kinges grace . xl s. 
Itin to the pages of the Quenes chambre . xx s. 
Itin to the children of the prive kechyn x s. 

Itin to the lord of mysrule . xx s> 

Itm to my Lord Prive Sealles foole . iij s. iiij d. 

Itin to Henry Glassbury x s 

Itm to a woman that brought a present of 

caponys to the Quene . "j "U d - 

Itin the last day of January to the Quenes 
purs at the Towre by thandes of George 
Hamerton . . Ixvj s. viij d. 

Itin the same day to William Hamerton for 
thre peces of blewe wursted of the lest 
cise at xiij s. iiij d. the pece xl s. Itin 
for viij Ib. of blewe lyere at xij d. the Ib. 
viij s. and for iij Ib. of ted and white 
thred at viij d. the Ib. ij s. Sin" 
Itm the vij* day of February to William 
Bulstrode for money by him payed to 
the keper of Coldharbrogh for wyne 
and fyre by the Quenes commaunde- 
ment at hure being there . "J 1U J d> 

< Sm a pag. xxxiij li. 



92 FEBRUARY, 15O3. 

Itm the same day to JVIaistres Lokke silke- 
woman in partie of payement of a bill 
signed with thande of the Quenes grace 
conteynyng the somme of Ix li. vj s. v d. 
to hure due for certain frontlettes bonettes 
and othere stuf of liure occupacon by hure 
deliverd to the Quenes use as it appereth 
by the said bill > J . . xx li. 

Itm the same day to Henry Coote of London 
goldsmyth in partie of payement of C 
markes to him due for certain plate 
delivered to the Quenes grace at Riche- 
mount and there lost and brent at the 
brennyng of the place there .:f' xxli. 

Itm the viij* day of February payed to 
John Henley of London sadler for 
hookes and crochettes by him delivered 
to William Hamerton yeoman of the 
Warderobe of the beddes from the last 
day of Novembre A xvij R. H. vij mi 
unto the furst day of Decembre anno 
xviij ' that is to wite at Grenewiche M 1 " 
M 1 hookes at v s. the M l . x s. Itin V c 
crochettes at xviij d. the C. vij s. vj d. 
Itm at Richemount iiij M> hookes at v s. 
the M* xv s. Itm viij c crochettes at 
xviij d. the C. xij s. Itin at Riche- 
mounte when the Quenes grace re- 
tourned from Walys xv hookes at vj d. 
the C. vij s. vj d. and iij crochettes at 
xviij d. the C. iiij s. vj d. Sin a . Ivj s. vj d. 

Itm the same day to John Whiting oon of 
the gentilmen huisshers of the Kinges 
chambre for money by him lent to the 



FEBRUARY, 1503. 93 

Quenes grace at the Toure whiche was 
geveii to thofficers of the Mynt in 
rewarde at the Quenes being there . xl s. 
Itm the X th day of February to Thomas Ac- 
wurth for tlie wages and bourde wages 
of the stable for a quarter ended at 
Cristmas last passed . qr. in ij folio sequen. 

Itm delivered to Pache for a present of poyn- 
garnettes oranges and othere frutes by 
him geven to the Queue in rewarde . vj s. viij d. 

r Sm a pag. xlv li. xij s. ij d. 



Itm the xij th day of February to Robert Ading- 
ton for lyuyng and hemmyng of a kyrtelle 
of blake sattyn for the Quenes grace xij d. 
Itm for making of thre dublettes of sat- 
tyn of Bruges for the Quenes fotemen at 
xx d. the pece v s. Itm for making of 
iij jakettes of blake velvet lyned with 
sarcenet for the same fotemen at xij d. 
the pece iij s. Itin for making a payre 
of slevys of blake sarcenet for the Quene 
of Scottes iiij d. and for mending of viij 
gownes of divers coloures belonging to 
the Quenes grace from Mydsomer to 
Cristmas at ij d. the pece xvj d. Sn . x s. viij d. 
Itin the same day to John Browne William 
Poole and JohnDuffyn for thaire costes 
going before and prepayring logging for 
the Quene from Baynardes Castelle to 



94 FEBRUARY, 1503. 

Westminstre by the space of twoo dayes 
every of theim at x d. the day v s. and 
to the said John Duffyn for his costes 
going from Hampton Courte to West- 
minstre for the maister of the barge by 
the Quenes commaundement xxd. Sm a vjs. viij d. 

Itin to my lady Anne for money geven unto 
hure by the queues grace for hure purs for 
a yere ended at mighelmas last past vj li. xiij s. iiij d. 

Itm to Oliver Aulferton keper of the Quenes 
goshauke for his diettes out of the Courte 
and for mete for his hauke and spanyelles 
for the yere last passed . . xxvj s. viij d. 

Itm to John Browne grome of the Quenes 
beddes for his costes riding upon the 
Quenes message for certain hunters in 
Wilts' by the space of xj dayes at x d. 
the day A y f r ^ .; . ix s. ij d. 

Itm to Robert Lanston for iiij yerdes of fllanell 
by him bought for my Lady Kateryn the 
Kinges dough tere at xij d. the yerd . iiij s. 

j> r Sm* pag. ix li. xs. vj d. 



Itin the XV th day of February to Lewes Wai- 
tier the Quenes bargeman for conveyeng 
the Quene in a grete bote from Riche- 
mount to Hampton Court with xij rowers 
every rower taking viij d. viij s. and the 
maister xvj d. Itin to the same Lewes 
for conveyeng the Quenes grace and hure 



FEBRUARY, 1503.' 95 

ladys in a grete bote with viij rowers the 
xiiij th day of Janyvere from Hampton 
Courte to Richemounte every rower 
taking viij d. by the day v s. iiij d. and 
the maister xvj d. I tin in rewarde to 
a man that kepte the said bote in 
Hampton Courte by the space of viij 
dayes at ij d. the day xvj d. I tin to the 
said Lewes for conveyeng the Queues 
said grace and hure Ladys in hure barge 
with xxij rowers the xxvj day of January 
from Richemounte to London every 
rower taking viij d. xiiij s. viij d. and 
the maister xvj d. Sm a . . xxxiij s. iiij d. 

Itm the same day to Robert Alyn yeoman 
huisshere of the Queues chambre for his 
costes prepayring lodging for the Quene 
from Westin to the Towre by the space of 
a day xij d. Itm from the Towre to Riche- 
mounte by the space of twoo dayes at x d. 
the day ij s. and from Richemont to the 
Towre again by the space of twoo dayes 
at xij d. the day ij s. Itm to Edmond 
Lyvesey yeoman by the space of iij dayes 
at xij d. the day iij s. Itm to William 
Poole grome for iij dayes at x d. the day 
ij 3. v j d. Itm to George Hamerton 
grome porter for iiij dayes at x d. the 
day iij s. iiij d. Itm to John Browne 
for twoo dayes xx d. Itm to John 
Bright page for ij dayes at viij d. the 
day xvj d. and to Edmond Calverd page 
for ij dayes xvj d. SnV xviij *. ij d. 

Itin the same day to Richard Brampton 



96 FEBRUARY, 1503. 

gentilman of the pantry with the Queue 
for money by him payed for the blades 
of a payre of carving knyves xiiij s. iiij d. 
and for a payre of smalle knyves inamyled 
for the Queues a\vne use viij s. Sin* . xxj s. iiij d. 

p* Sni a pag. Ixxij s. x d. 



Itm the xxvj day of February to John 
DufFyn for money by him geven in 
reward to Henry Glasebury wif by the 
Quenes commaundement vj s. viij d. 
Itm to a man that went on pilgremage 
to our Lady of Willesden by the Queues 
commaundement iij s. iiij d. Sm a . x s. 

Itm the same day to Thomas Humberston 
for making of hosyn for the Quenes 
fotemen from the xviij 111 day of January 
anno xvij unto the xxviij* day of 
February A xviij that is to wit for the 
making and lynyng of x payre of wachet 
hosyn at xij d. the payre x s. and for 
makyng and lynyng of viij payre of blake 
hosyn at xij d. the payere viij s. . xviij s. 

Itm to William Trende for money by him 
layed out for the making of a cheste 
and almorys in the Quenes Counsaille 
Chambre for to put in the bokes . x s. 

Itm to James Nattres for his costes going into 
Kent for DoctourHallyswurth phesicon 
to comme to the Quene by the Kinges 
commaundement. Furst for his bote hyre 
from the Towre to Gravys ende and 



MARCH, J503. 97 

again iij s. iiij d. Itm to twoo watermen 
abiding at Gravys ende unto suche tyme 
the said James camme again for theire 
expenses viij d. Itfn for horse hyre and 
to guydes by nyght and day ij s. iiij d. 
and for his awne expenses xvj d. Sm a . vij s. viij d. 

Itfn for thoffring of the Quene upon the 

Feest of the Purificacon of oure Lady xxv s. 

Itfn for cai iage of a doe from Fasterne to the 
Towre to the Queue against Candelmas 
day . . . iij s. iiij d. 

Itfn to Robert Penson skynner in partie of 
payement of a bille signed with thande 
of the Quene conteignyng the somme of 
C xiiij li. v s. v d. to him due for certain 
stuf of his occupacon as it appereth by 

XX 

the same bille . . . iiij ij li. ij s. 

XX 

p r Sm pag. iiij v li. xvj s. 



Itfn to Symond Warde of London lorymere 

for v D D bittes at xiiij s. the D D . Ixx s. 

Itfn the iij de day of Marche to Thomas Ac- 
wurth for thexpenses of the Quenes 
stable . . C xiiij li. vj s. viij d. 

Itfn the same day Maister Richard Peyn the 
Quenes aulmoigner for the buryeng of 
Griffith late yeoman of the Quenes 
chambre and for the making of him a 
broder of Saint Margretts at Westminstre xiij s. iiij d. 

Itfn the same day to Dame Margrette Cotton 
for the dyettes of Edward Pallet sone to 
O 



98 MARCH, 1503. 

the Lady Jane Bangham for half a yere 
ended at the Purificacon of oure Lady 
last passed xx s. Itin for a boke for the 
same Edward vj d. I tin for a bonnette 
xvj d. Itin for iij payre of shoys xij d. 
and for iij payre of hosyn xij d. Sin* xxiij s. x d. 

Itin the same day to Henry Roper page of 
the Quenes beddes for his costes going 
before and prepayring logging for the 
Quene from Westminstre to the Towre 
by the space of ij dayes at viij d. the day 
xvj d. Itin for his bote hyre and costs 
going for stuf to Baynardes Castelle and 
bringing the same to Westminstre to the 
Queue viij d. Itin for his costes going 
before from Richemount to the To\vre 
and there being by the space of v dayes 
at viij d. the day iij s. iiij d. and for his 
costes going from Richemount to Lon- 
don to Henry Wurley to bringe the 
Quenes Newe Yeres giftes by the space 
of twoo dayes at viij d. the day xvj d. 
Sin a . (4 .s . . vj s. viij d. 

Itin to Thomas Woodnotte grome of the 
Quenes chambre for money by him payed 
at the Towre for Coin.... for the King 
and the Quene .'. .. ij s. ix d. 

Itin to Henry Wurley of London goldsmyth 
in partie of payement of a warrant 
signed with thande of the Quene con- 
teignyng the somme of C xliiij li. to him 
due for certain stuf of his occupacon 
delivered to the use of the Quene xx li. xvij s. vj d. 

ff SnY pag. C Ixx li. ix d. 



MARCH, 1503. 99 



WAGES. 

Itin to my Lady Kateryne for hir pencon for 
an hole yere ended at Mighelmas last 
passed . j j^ 

Itm to my said Lady for a quarter ended at 

Cristmas last passed . . x ij ii. x s. 

Itin to my Lord Haward for the diettes of my 
Lady Anne for a yere ended at Mighel- 
mas last passed . . . C xx li. 

Itm to my Lady Brygette . . l xv j s. viij d. 

Itin to my Lady Elizabeth Stafford xxxiij li. vj s. viij d. 

Itin to Maistres Mary Ratcliff . x li. 

Itin to Lady Alyanor Verney . . xx li. 

Itin to Dame Jaane Guldeford . xiij li. vj s. viijd. 

Itin to Dame Elizabeth Peche . . lxvj s. viij d. 

Itin to Maistres Elizabeth Denton . xx li. 

Itm to Maistres Anne Crowmer . x li. 

Itin to Maistres Alianor Johnes vj li. xiij s. iiij d. 

Itin to Maistres Mary Denys . vj li. xiij s. iiij d. 

Itin to Maistres Elisabeth Catesby . C s. 

Itin to Maistres Margrette Bone vj li. xiij s. iiij d. 

Itin to Maistres Margrette Belknap vj li. xiij s. iiij d. 

Itin to Maistres Elisabeth Lee vj li. xiij s. iiij d. 

Itm to Maistres Anne Weston vj li. xiij s. iiij d. 

Itin to Maistres Elyn Brent . vj li. xiij s. iiij d. 

Itm to Maistres Anne Browne for half yere 

ended at Mighelmas last passed 1 s. 

Itin to Maistres Margrette Wotton for half 

yere ended at Mighelmas last passed . xl 2. 

Itin to Maistres Elisabeth Fitzherbert . Iiij s. iiij d. 

Itm to Alice Skeling C s. 

Itm to Elisabeth Baptiste . lxvj s. viij d. 

2 



10O MARCH, 1503. 

Itin to Fraunceys Baptiste . . Iiij s. iiij d. 

Itin to Agnes Dean the Quenes laundre . Ixvj s. viij d. 
fltin to Beatrix Bradowe rokker to my 

yong Lord Henry Courteney . xiij s. iiij d. 

Itin to Emme Bragges rokker to my 

Lady Margrette Courteney . xx s. 

Itin to Alice Williams rokker to my yong 
| Lord Edward Courteney for a yere 

and quarter at Cristmas . xl s. 

Itm to Lawrance Travers . . xxvj s. viij d. 

<p' Sih a pag. CCC Ixxiiij li. 



Itm to Maister Arthure for a yere ended at 

Mighelmas last passed . xxvj li. xiij s. iiij d. 

Itm to the same M. Arthure for a quarter 

ended at Cristmas last passed vj li. xiij s. iiij d. 

Itm to William Denton carver to the Quene 

xxvj li. xiij s. iiij d. 

Itin to Heyward Skynner . C s. 

Itm to John Staunton thelder . . Ixvj s. viij d. 

Itm to Owen Whitstones messagier . xl s. 

Itin to Marques Loryden mynstrelle . Ixvj s. viij d. 

Itin to Janyn Marcazin mynstrelle . Ixvj s. viij d. 

Itin to Richard Denouse mynstrelle . Ixvj s. viij d. 

Itin to John Ricroft ..,/ . . xiij s. iiij d. 

Itin to Olyver Aulferton keper of the Quenes 

goshauke . . xl s. 

Itm to Richard Elyot the Quenes attourney x li. 

Itin to Richard Decons for his wages of thof- 

fice of the Signet . , x li. 



MARCH, 1503. 101 

Itm to the same Richard Decons aswelle for 
his wages for the receipt of the Quenes 
money as for his costes lyeng in London 
aboutes the Quenes rnatiers and busynes- 
ses and ryding for the surveyeng of the 
Quenes landes . xvj li. xiij s. iiij d. 

Itm to Richard Bedelle the Quenes auditor 

for his fee . . x li. 

Itm to the same Auditour for his wages and 

riding costes . . xxix li. xvj s. viij d. 

Itin to the same Auditour for the compiling 

of the values . . . Iiij s. iiij d. 

Itm to the Clerc of the Quenes Counsaille C s. 

Itin to John Holand keper of the Counsaille 

Chambre . . iiij li. xj s. iij d. 

Itin to John Mordant Sargeant at Lawe . xl s. 

Itin to Humfry Conysby Sargeant at Lawe xl s. 

Itni to James Hobert the Kings Attourney xxvj s. viij d. 

Itin to Richard Empson . . xxvj s. viij d. 

,p r Sin a pag. Clxxviij li. vij s. xj d. 



Itm to S r Morgan Kydwelly . . xxvj s. viij d. 

Itin to Richard Cutlerd . . xxvj s. viij d. 

Itin to William Mordant attourney in the 

Commen place . . xx s. 

Itin to Henry Kemys attourney of the towne 

of Bristowe for the receipt of the fee 

ferme of the same towne . . vj s. viij d. 

Itin to Thomas Goodman for the receipt of 

the fee ferme of Barton Bristowe . xx s. 



102 MARCH, 1503. 

Itm to John Coope for keping of the Quenes 
stuf of hur warderobe of the beddes 
within Baynardes Castel . . xxvj s. viij d. 

Itin to Richard Windesore decessed for his 
annuitee for the half yere ended at Estre 
last past . . . xxvj s. viij d. 

Itin to Alice Massy the Quenes mydwif . x li. 

Itin to Margrette Gough . . Ixvj s. viij d. 

Itin to Thancoresse of Saint Michelle besides 

Saint Albons , . . xxvj s. viij d. 

Itm to Raaf Crestenere . . liij s. iiij d. 

Itin to S r William Barton preest synging at 

oure Lady of Berking . . vij ii. vj s. viij d. 

Itin to S r Robert Byrche singyng at our Lady 

of Piewe . . . vj li. xiij s. iiij d. 

Itin to Richard Decons for papure parche- 

myn hike and wax . . Ixvj s. viij d. 

Itm to Richard Bedell the Quenes auditour 

for paper parchemyn inke and wax , xxxiij s. iiij d. 

Itm to the Clerc of the Counsaille for papure 

parchemyn inke and wax ^ . xxv s. 

Itm to Waltier Reynold keper of the garden 
at Baynardes Castelle for his wages for 
a hole yere ended at Mighelmas last 
passed . . ' . : . Ix s. x d. 

|) r Sin* pag. xlviij li. vs. x d. 



MARCH, 1503. 103 

Itra the viij u day of Marche to John Hynsted 
of London wexchaundeler for iij rolles of 
white wex of iij 1ft price the 1ft xv d. 
iiij s. and for iij rolles yelowe wex of 
iij 1ft price the 1ft viij d. ij s. by him de- 
livered to the Queues use. Sin" . vj s. 

Itfii to the same John Hynsted for iiij rolles 
white wex of iiij 1ft price the 1ft xvj d. 
sm a . v s. iiij d. and for viij rolles yelowe 
wex of viij 1ft price the 1ft viij d. v s. 
iiij d. Sin 8 . . . x s. viij d. 

I tin to John Cope of London Taillour for the 
lynyng and covering of a lytture of blake 
velvet with blake cloth for the Quene, 
wherin the princes was brought from 
Ludlowe to London, frynged aboute with 
blake valance and the twoo hed peces of 
the same bounden aboute with blake 
rebyn and frynged abowte with blake 
valance . . .vs. 

Itin to Thomas Eldreton for the costes and 
charges of the buryeng of the yong lord 
Edward Courteney Son to the Lady Ka- 
teryn Suster to the Quene iiij li. xviij s. 
iiij d. and for money by him geven by 
the commaundement of the Quene at the 
de[part]u[re] of the Norice and Rokker 
of the same lord, xxvj s. viij d. Sm a . vj li. v s. 

Itih to John Rolf yeoman of the Close Carre 
for money by him payed for twoo Ax- 
trees for the said carre ij s. Itin for v 
1ft of clowtes vij d. oft. Itm for half an 
hundred of nayllys ij d. Itin in oynte- 



104 MARCH, 1503. 

ment. ij d. I tin for a stirrope for the 
[same] iiij d. and for making of twoo lynes 
ij d. Sm* . . . iij s. v d. o 

Itm payed for a pece of wursted bought by 
Richard Smyth yeoman of the Quenes 
robys for the use of the Quene xxxiij s. iiij d. 

,p r Sin a pag. ix li. iij s. vd. ob. 



Itm payed for a bonet for the yong lord 

Henry Courteney . . xx d. 

Itm payed to Cristofre Ascue for v yerdes of 
Streyt white by him delivered to Nicholas 
Sadler for the use of the Quenes grace at 
ij s. the yerd . . . x s. 

Itin payed to the same Cristofre for v yerdes 
of cotton russet of him bought by Nicho- 
las Sadler for the Quenes Chaare at vj d. 
the yerd . . . ij s. vj d. 

Itin payed to John Lynne of London whele- 
wright for certain necessaryes for the 
Chare by him delivered to John Herman 
Sergeant of the Queues said Chaare for 
the yere last past as it appereth by a bill 
signed with thande of the Quene . xv s. ob. 

Itin the XV th day of Marche to Thomas [Ac- 
wourth] in full conteutacon of the .... 
of the stable . . . xiij x. 

Itin payed for the dyettes of John Pertriche 
oon of the sonnes of mad Beale for a yere 
endyng at Cristmas last past : . 



MARCH, 1503. 10,5 

Itm for ij yerdes of cloth for a gowne for the 
same John Pertriche at ij s. viij d. the 
yerd v s. iiij d. Itin for v yerdes fustyan 
for a cote at vij d. the yerd ij s. xj d. 
Itin for lynyng and making of the same 
gowne and cote iij s. iiij d. Itm for iiij 
shirtes ij s. viij d. Itm for vj payre 
shoyn ij s. Itin for iiij payre of hosyn 
xvj d. Itin for his lernyng xx d. Itm 
for a prymer and saulter xx d. And 
payed to a surgeon whiche heled him of 
the Frenche pox xx s. Sin" . xl s. 

Itin to Maulde Hamond for keping of hir 
children geven to the Quene for a quar- 
ter ended at Cristmas last past . iiij s. 

ii 
j) r Sm a pag. iiij ii. ij s. x d. oH 



Itin to Richard Smyth yeoman of the Quenes 
robys in full contentacon and payement 
of iij billes signed with thande of Uie 
Quene oon bill of xiiij Ii. viij s. an other 
of C vij s. xj d. and the third of iiij Ii. 
x s. ix d. to him due for certain neces- 
ryes by him bought for the Quenes grace 
as it appereth by the same billes xxiiij Ii. xj s. viij d. 

Itin to Jerom Bonvice in partie of payement 
of a bill signed with thande of the 
Quene conteignyng the somme of 

remaignyng with the said Jerom xx s. 

Itin to John Wyrdon by the commaundement 
of the Quene 

p 



106 MARCH, 1503. 

Itm to John Holand for his costes riding from 
London to the baillif of the franches of 
Cokeham and Bray and to Stratfeld 
Mortymer to cause them to comme to 
London for theire accomptes . vj s. viij d. 

Itm for the supplusage of the last accompte 
as it appereth in the boke of the last 
yere . . . . lij ti. xj s. 

xx 

<p r Sm a pag. iiij xix li. ix s. iiij d. b. 



SOME OF THALLOWAUNCE PAYMENTES AND LYVEREYS 

BEFORESEID M M M CCCC XJ li. V s, IX d. q. 



RECEIPTS. 107 



[At the beginning of the Book are the following Pages.] 

HERE ENSUEN THE RECEIPTES OP RYCHARD DECONS 

FROM THE XxiiLj* DAY OP MARCHE ANNO XVIJ m 
UNTO 

TERMING PASCHE. 

let and F urs t of William Knoyell receyvor ther of 
thissues and revenues of his recept for 
the said terme 

[7%e remainder of this Page is wholly illegible.} 



COM 



TERMING PASCHE. 
' WILTESHYER BERKSHIRE AND SOUTHAMPTON. 

ud Grene- O f S< Richard Nanfan fermour of the lord- 

5JT ship of Odiham by thandes of Robert ^ 

Wakefeld bailiff there 
3Ud orene. Of S< John Frye preest fermour of Worthy 
wiche *iijo MO*- . vnjh.xiijs.nuci 

die Maij. 

die Junij. Of Waltu 

Of the same 

[ The rest of the Page illegible.] 

SnV CCCliijxviijli. vj s. ijd. 

P 2 



108 RECEIPTS. 



SWALOWFELD. 



Of Richard Smyth baillif there of thissues 
and revenues of the same lordship for a 
yere ended at Mighelmas last passed 

xxiiij li. xvj s. j d. ob. 



COM' HEREFORD AND WURCESTRE. 

Of John Middelmore receyvor there of this- 
sues of his receipt for the terme of Estre xxij li. 
Of the same John Middelmore . xx li. 
Of the same John Middelmore . r* sW xij li. 

[ The remainder of this Page is illegible.'] 



COM' GLOUCESTRE AND WILTS. 

Of Edmond Tame receyvor there C lij li. 

Of the same Edmond Tame in Woodstok 

Ixvj li. xiij s. iiij d. 
[The same.} 



COM* HERTFORD. 
[This Page contains four or five Entries, but they are illegible.} 



RECEIPTS. 



COM' ESSEX. 

Of William Blake for the warde and mar- 
riage of John Carewe sonne and heyre 
of S r W illiam Carewe Knight deceased xxv li. 

Of William Poyntz receyvor there . xl li. 

Of the same William Poyntz by thands of 

Thomas Acwurth . . XX vj li. xiij s. iiij d. 

[ The remainder is illegible.'] 



FEE FARMS. 
TERMING PASCHE. 

Of the fee ferine of the Monastery of Saint 

Albons . . . xvj li. xiij s. iiij d. 

Of the fee ferine of the towne of Bristowe Ij li. vij s. ix d. 
Of the fee ferme of the towne of Bedford . x li. 
Of the fee ferme of the towne of Oxonford xvij li. x s. 
Of the fee ferme of Kynfare and Stourton . iiij li. x s. 
Of the fee ferme of Alyseowen . . C iij s. iiij d. 



[ The next two Pages are illegible.'] 



HO RECEIPTS. 



MONEY RECEIVED OF THARRERAGS. 

Of Richard Harveys receyvor of the lordship 
of Fekenham for tharrerags of the last 
yere - . . . C s. 



FINES. 

Furst of Cristofre Throkemarton Squier for a 
fyne by him made to the Queues grace 
for the ferme of the demaynes belonging 
to the manor of Marcle in the Countie 
of Hereford and for the Baillisship of 
Marcle xx ti. 



MONEY RECEYYED OF THE QUENES GRACE. 

Furst of hire grace by thandes of S r Thomas 
Lovell Knight as money by him lent to 
the Quene upon certain plate . D li. 

Itm receyved of hure grace by thandes of 
Maistres Alianor Jofins at Ragland the 
xviij* day of August . ? . x ti. 

Itm by thandes of Thabbot of Foumesse 

xxxiij ti. vj s. viij d. 

j>* Sm* Dxliij ti. vj s. viij d. 



RECEIPTS. 

AURUM REGINE. 

[No Entryoccurs under this head.] 



SWALOFELD. 



[No Entry.] 



FODRINGHEY. 



Receyved of Benet Brocas Receyvour of the 
Landes late belonging to the Duchesse 
of Suff. of thissues and Revenues of the 
same . . C. iiij" xviij li. xv. ix d. ob. 



SOME TOTALL OF THE RECEYPTES BEFORESIDE 

THIS YERE M M M D Ilfj V 11. XIX S. X d Ob. 



THE 



TOarfcrobe &ccotmt0 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH, 



THE 18th APRIL TO THE 29th SEPTEMBER, 
20 EDW. IV. 1480. 



113 



' THE Parcelles of the Accomptes of Piers Courteys whome 
the Kings Highnesse and goode grace hath assigned and 
ordeigned by his high comaundement to rule gouverne and 
kepe his grete Warderobe within his Citee of London and 
all his goodes and stuff beying within the same unto his 
mooste honourable usse safly for to kepe, and also for to 
make into the same his saide grete Warderobe monysion 
of all maner of stuff necessary to and for his moost honour- 
able use and behove And also for other personnes at his 
said high comaundement And to make oute off the same 
his grete Wardrobe deliverec of stuff at alle tymes neces- 
sarie and behovefull by his saide high comaundement as 
wel for his moste royal personne as for all other personnes 
at his said high comaundement And also as well of alle 
sommes of money by hym receyved provysions of stuff 
goodes and merchandises boght and pourveyede and 
deliveree off the same made as of all costes and expenses 
by hym made and doon in thoffice of the same grete 
Warderobe unto the use and behove of oure saide souve- 
rayn Lorde the Kyng and other at his said high comaunde- 
ment that is to wit from the xviij day of Aprille in the 
xx th yere of the moost noble reigne off oure souverayn 
Lorde Kyng Edward the iiij th unto the Fest of Saint 
Mighell tharchaungelle than next and im medially suyng 
that is to say by a quarter of a yere and Ixviij dayes." 



115 



WARDROBE ACCOUNTS 

or 

KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 

A 1480. 



" MONEY commen and growen off the ferine of the man- 
sions and tenementes apperteignyng and belonging unto 
the same grete Warderobe within the said time," [the 
tenants of each of the tenements are mentioned with the 
amount of their respective rents] . vij ii. xviij d. 

" The same Accomptant charges hymself frely to have 
receyved of the Kyngs Highnesse and good grace as in 
the price and value of diverse velvetts satyns damasks and 
other silks boght of Piers de Vraulx of Montpelier in Gas- 
coignyne . . CCC xxxviij li. xvs. vjd. 

" And off C ii. also by hym receyved of the Kings High- 
nesse and goode grace for the making of vj coursour 
harneis, and an hoby harneis of grene velvett enbrowdered 
and wroght with ageletts of silver and gilt and spangf of 
silver and gilt. 

" And of xlviij li. xviij s. iiij d. receyved of the Kings 
Highnesse and goode grace as in price and value of 
CC 1 xxix unces di' in old spangf and wa? floures of silver 
and gilt of the Kings own store after price of the unce 
iij s. vjd." 

To divers persons for scarlet cloth at from seven to ten 
shillings the yard, of violet ingrain from eleven to thir- 
teen shillings and four pence the yard ; of cloth of Mustre- 



116 WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 

vilers from iij s. viij d. to v s. the yard ; of " Franche blac 
cloth" from v s. iiij d. to xiij s. iiij d. the yard; of russet cloth 
at iiij s. the yard ; for murrey and blue cloth from ij s. viij d. 
to iij s. iiij d. the yard ; and for green cloth at vj s. viij d. 
the yard ; to skinners for " skinnesof fox of Irland" at vij d. 
the pece ; for " powderings made of bogy leggs" at ij s. the 
hundred ; for white lamb skins at xiiij s the hundred ; for " a 
furre of blac bogy shanks" xiij s. iiij d. ; and for bogy shanks 
vij d. each. 

For crimson velvet of Mountpelier in Gascony at 
xiiij s. and xxs. the yard; for black velvet; black velvet 
speckled with white ; " blue velvet figured with tawny ;" 
white velvet ; white velvet with black spots ; tawny vel- 
vet; " motley velvet ;" "chekkerd velvet;" " grene chaunge- 
able velvet;" "velvet purpull ray and white;" "velvet 
russet figury;" "velvet cremysyn figured with white" at 
viij s. the yard. 

For black cloth of gold at xl s. the yard ; for " velvet 
upon velvet white tysshue clothe of golde and for xxv yerds 
di' of velvet uppon velvefgrene tisshue cloth of golde" at 
xls. the yard; for " cloth of gold broched upon satyn 
ground" at xxiiij s. the yard ; for " blue clothe of silver 
broched uppon satyn ground" at xxiiij s. the yard. 

For white and black damask at viij s. the yard ; green 
damask at vij s. viij d. the yard ; " white damask with 
floures of diverse colours" at viij s. the yard ; " damask 
cremysyn and blue with floures" at vj s. the yard ; for black 
satin at vij s. the yard ; white satin at x s. the yard ; green 
satin at viij s. the yard ; for " chameletts of diverse colours" 
at xxx s. the piece; black chamelet at iiijs. the yard. 

For " baldekyn of silke" at xxxiij s. iiij d. the pece; 
to Richard Rawson of London Alderman for " grene and 
white sarsynett" at iij s. vj d. the yard ; to John Pykering 
citizen and mercer of London for grene sarsinett at 
at iij s. ij d. the yard ;" for sarsinetts ehaungeables and 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 117 

other diverse colours after v yerds to the C, price of every 
yerde iiij s." for tawney sarcinet at iij s. iiij d. the yard. 

For a piece of " grene tartaryn xviijs." for "rede 
worsted of the moost assize" at xxxiij s. iiij d. the piece ; 
for " rede worsted of the niyddel assise" at xv 5. vj d. the 
piece; for " worsted grene and rede of the mvddel assise" 
at xv s. vj d. the piece ; and for red worsted " of the leeste 
assise," at xs. vj d. the piece. 

' To Alice Claver sylkwoman for an unce of sowing 
silk" xiv d. ; for " ij yerds di' and a naille corse of blue 
silk weying an unce iij quarters di' price the unce ij s. viij d. 
vs. ; for iiij yerds di' of quarter corse of blac silk weying iij 
unces price the unce ij s. iiij d. vij s. ; for vj unces and 
iij quarters of silk to the laces and tassels for garnysshing 
of diverse Books price the unce xiiij d. vij s. x d. ob. ; 
for the making of xvj laces and xvj tassels made of the 
said vj unces and iij quarters of silke price in grete ij s. viij d. 
and for xvj hotons of blue silk and gold price in grete 
iiij s." 

For " streyte riban of silk" at xvd. the ounce; for 
" brode ryban of blac silk for girdelles" at xv d. the ounce ; 
for " ryban of silk for poynts laces and girdelles" at xivd. 
the ounce ; for ij dosen laces and a double lace of silk 
made of ryban of silk" at xv d. the ounce ; for " a mantell 
lace of blue silk with botons of the same" xvij s. ; for " xl 
dosen poynts of silk ribbon at xx s. the pound and xv d. 
the ounce ;" for " freuge of gold of Venys" at vj s. the 
ounce ; " for frenge of silk yelowe grene rede white and 
blue at xviijs viij d. the pound and xviij d. the ounce; 
for a garter of rudde richely wroght with silke and golde 
xvij s." 

For a " counterpoynt of arras silk with ymagery con- 
teignyng xix fT elles Ix s. ;" for " iiij counterpoynts wherof 
j of arras with ymagery without silk oon other of greene 



118 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 

verdours with trees ; oon other of white verdour with a 
scripture and the iiij th of white verdour playn" price of one 
with the other xxij s. iiij d. each ; for " iiij costerings of wool 
paled rede and blue with rooses sonnes and crownes in 
every pane xij li." 

" To Lisbet Ketiller for a grete tikke xxxij s. for a 
myddell tikke xxxivs. for CCC Ibs. of down atxlvj s. viij d. 
the hundred ;" for featherbeds with bolsters to them from 
xvj s. viij d. to xx s. each. 

For thread at xvj d the Ib. for Utnaid thread at vij d. 
the Ib. ; for five ounces of ribbon of green thread at j d. 
the ounce. 

To Marty n Jumbard embroiderer for eight great roses 
embroidered at iiij d. each, and for xlviij small roses 
embroidered at j d. each. 

For eight pair of hosen of cloth of divers colours at 
xiij s. iiij d. the pair ; and for four pair " of sokks of fustian" 
at iij d. the pair. 

" To Petir Herton cordewaner for a pair of shoon 
double soled of blac leder not lined" price v d. ; " \ pair 
shoon of blac ledre double soled and not lyned price of 
every pair" xiiij d. ; for " two pair shoon of Spanish ledre 
double soled arid not lyned price the paire" xvj d. " a 
pair of shoon single soled" vj d. ; for " a pair shoon of 
Spanish ledre single soled" v d. each pair ; for xj pair 
sloppes wherof oon pair of blue ledre iiij payr of Spaynyssh 
leder v pair of tawny leder and a paire of red Spaynyssh 
leder price of every payre xviij d. a pair of sloppes of blac 
leder v d. and for a pair sloppes of by yond see leder price 
vj d." " for viij paire of sloppes* lyned with blac velvet of 
the Kings own store j" to Thomas Hatche for two pair 
" of slippers price the pair vij d." 

- Notices of Sloppes of "russet leder," "tawny leder," and of red Spanish 
leather also occur, each of which cost xx d. 



KINO EDWARD THE FOURTH. 119 

" To the same Peter Herton for ij pair patyns of leder 
price the pair xij d." for a " pair of Botews of tawney 
Spaynyssh leder price xvj d. for vij pair Botews of blac 
leder above the kne price of every pair iiij s." " for ij 
paire Botews sengle blac ledre unto the knee price the 
pair iij s. iiij d. for iij pair of Botews of rede Spaynyssh leder 
single above the knee ; and for viij paire of Botews of tawny 
leder above the knee price of every paire vj s." 

" The same Peter Herton for a pair of Bootes of blac 
leder price vj s. viij d.; and for ij paire of Bootes oon of 
rede Spaynyssh leder and the other tawny Spaynyssh leder 
price of either paire viij s." 

To " Selys goldesmythe for M Iij ageletts of silver and 
gilt weying CC Ixxxj unces iij quarters and for C Iv unces 
grete and small spangf of silver and gilt cont' in all 
CCCC xxvj unces and iij quarters price of every unce vj s. 
C xxviij li. vj d. with xlviij li. xviij s. iiij d. as in the price 
of CC Ixxix unces di' of old spangf and wa? floures of 
silver aud gilt of the Kings own store delivered unto the 
said Selys in partie of paiement of the said C xxviij li. vj d." 

" For the Copersmythe for iij paire of claspes of cooper 
and gilt with roses uppon them price of every peire iij s." 
for two paire of claspes of coper and gilt with the Kings 
armes upon them price the pair v s. and for Ixx bolyons of 
coper and gilt xlvj s. viij d." 

For " a paire off blac spurres parcell gilt vs." for " a 
paire of longe spurres parcell gilt price vj s." 

For iiij hattes of wolle price the pece xij d." for " a 
hatte of wolle price viij d. ;" for " bonetts" from ij s. vj d. 
to iij s. " every pece." 

To " Hastings Purssyvant for x ostriche feders price of 
every pece x s." 

" For di' C ryngs of laton iiij d." " to John Coper- 
smythe for CC smal gilte nailes price of every C iiij d." 



120 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 

To Piers Draper citizen and ironmonger for " crochetts 
of the moost and mydell and leest assise" the first at 
iij s. iiij d. the second at ij s. vj d. and the last at xviij d. 
the hundred ; for " tapethooks" at vj d. and " tenterhooks" 
at ij d. the hundred; for a " clove hamer" xij d. 

" And in the wages of diverse Taillors working in the 
same Warderobe as well aboute the making of diverse 
roobes and garmentes for the Kings moost royal persone 
as for the lynyng of diverse peces of arras and tapicery ; 
with also verdours lyned with busk" [Then follow their 
names and the amount of each of their wages whence it 
appears that they received from viij d. to vj d. per diem 
each ; and the whole sum paid them was vj li. x s.] 

" And in the wages of John Caster skynner and other 
diverse skynners workinge aboute the furring of diverse 
roobes and garmentes of owre said Souverain Lorde the 
King and making of divers furres of sables for the same" 
at vj d. per diem xiiij li. x s. vd. 

" John Poyntmaker for pointyng of xl dosen points of 
silk pointed with ageletts of laton for every dosen pointing 
ij d." " and for pointing of ij dosen double laces for either 
dosen ij d." 



EXPENSES NECESSARY. 

John Poyntmaker for pointing of xl dosen points of silk 
pointed with agelettes of laton for every dosen pointing ij d. 
vj s. viij d. -, and for pointing of ij dosen double laces for either 
dosen ij d. iiij d. The aforesaid Richard Andrewe citezein 
and hosier of London for making and lynyng of vj pair of 
hosen of puke lyned with cloth of the goodes of the saide 
Richard for lynyng of every pair iij s. iiij d. xx s. John 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 121 

Copersmythe for the amending of a broken chayer 
emended with small' gilt nailles iij d. Rauff Vnderwood 
wyredrawer for iij Ib. and a quart'on of wyre of iren forto 
hang with verdours ayenst the grete bay windowe in the 
Quenes old chambre in the Warderobe towarde the Dragon 
price of every Ib' viij d. ij s. ij d. and for crochetts and 
tapethooks for the hangyng of the same verdours iiij d. 
and for his werkemanship hanging the saide verdours iij d. 

" Robert Boylet for wasshing of ij pair of shets and ij pair 
of fustians that were occupied by Thambassiatours of 
Fraunce whiche were loged in Maister Sutton place xij d. 
And for wasshing of ij pair of shets of ij breds and viij pair 
of shetes everiche of iij bredes after the Kinges departing 
froin his grete Warderobe in the monethe of Juyll' the 
xx ' yere of his mooste noble reigne, for euery pair wassh- 
ing iij d. ij s. vj d. 

" And for ceryng candell' at ij tymes vd. And to Joh'n 
Massy lawyer for tawing of a tymbre of hole sables iiij s. 
And to Robert Boyllet for xxx burdons of risshes at divers 
tymes whan the Kinges highriesse and goode grace rested 
and abode at his said grete Warderobe with the cariage of 
the same iij s. iiij d. 

" William Whyte taloughchaundeller for iij dosen 
and ix Ib' of pis candell' for to light whan the Kings high- 
nesse and goode grace on a nyhgt come unto his said grete 
Warderobe and at other divers tyrnes price of every Ib' j d. 
q* iij s. viij d. q*. And to Agneys Cosyn for making of viij 
pair of shetes of Brusseh" clothe everiche of ij bredes for 
making of every paire vj d. iiij s. 

" John Carter for cariage away of a grete loode of 
robeux that was left in the strele after the reparacon 
made vppon a hous apperteignyng unto the same Warde- 
robe late in the tenure of John Malter ferrour iiij d. 
And to a laborer called Rychard Gardyner workyng in 
the gardyne of the same Warderobe aboute clensing and 



122 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 

making clene of the said gardyne and other thyngs by 
iiij daies di' takyng iiij d. by the day xviij d. And to Piers 
Draper for M 1 sprigge price vj d. And for di M of latis- 
naille price iij d. of hym so boght and expended at 
Eltham aboute covering of the fonte att the cristenyng of 
Lady Kateryn the Kings doughter. And payed to ij water- 
men for bote hyre and cariage of divers chistes and cofres 
with other divers stuff belonging unto thoffice of the Roobes 
within the moost honourable household of cure saide souve- 
rain lorde the Kyng from Grenvviche unto Baynardes 
Castelle in London iiij d. ; and from thens for cariage of 
the same stuff into his saide grete Warderobe iiij d. And 
unto John Huntman for cariage and bringing of the Kinges 
carre at divers tymes frome Grenewiche to London ij s. 

"And to Alice Shapster for making and wasshing of xxiiij 
sherts and xxiiij stomachers, v dosen handcouverchieffes, 
and xij combe coverchieffes, for making and wasshing of 
every sherte xij d., xxiiij s. ; and for making of every cou- 
verchieff ij d. xvj s. ; for making and wasshing of v pair of 
shets, everiche of iiij bredes and v elles di' longe, for every 
paire, making and wasshing iij s. iiij d., xvj s. viij d. : for 
making and wasshing of xiiij pair of shets everiche of 
iij breds> for every pair making and wasshing xx d. xxiij s. 
iiij d. : for making and wasshing of viij pair of shetes, everiche 
of ij breds, for every pair making and wasshing vj d., iiij s. j 
and for making and wasshing of iij hedeshets large xij d. 

"And in money payed by the said accomptant unto John 
Lucas of Kent for seasing of a pece of blac satyn course 
cont' xxxviij yerdes forfait unto the Kiuges highnes, that is 
to say, for the said John Lucas rewarde for xix yerdes of 
the same satyn, moite of the said xxxviij yerdes satin to hym 
due by statute of suche forfaitures made, preised at vs. iiij d. 
the yerd, C j s. iiij d. And for the batillage and bootehire 
of the said accomptant as it hath bene accustumed after 
the rate of v marc by the yerde, that is to witt, for a quarter 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 123 

of a yere and Ixviij dales, within the tyme of this accompte, 
after the rate of ij d. by the day, xxviij s. 

Sin" pagine hue x li. xix s. viij d." 



' REPARACION OFF THE KINGES CARRE. 

" Costes and expenses inaade and doon as well for neces- 
sarie thinges boght for the Kynges carre and for the repara- 
con of the same within the tyme of this accompte, that is to 
witte, John Jaks for a forehors bridelle, price iiij s. ; for v 
other bridels price the pece ij s. iiij d. xj s. viij d. ; for vj 
teyng haltres, price the pece xvj d., viij s. ; for v pair trays 
garnyssht, price in grete xxvs.; for vj drawing colers, price 
the pece, iij s. ; xviij s. for a crouper for the lymour, price 
iiij s. for a doser price ij s. iiij d. ; for a lymour sadell' price 
vs. ; for apayre lymour hamys garnissht xviij d. ; and for a 
payre of braying roopes price vj d. Sm a to 1 iiij ii. 

" And to Agneys Philipp for ij auxeltrees for the same 
carre ij s. ; for xv Ib. cloutes at ij d. the lb., ij s. vj d. ; for 
stiroppes viij d. ; for ij bondes of iren iiij d.; for a bedd xvj d. ; 
for CC nailles viij d. ; for a chevel bolt and a lymour bolte 
weying xvj lb. price in grete ij s. viij d. for iiij newe lynces 
weying xvj lb. at ij d. xij d. ; a speringcheyne with staples 
and hookes weying xvj lb. at ij d., ij s. viij d. ; for ij braying 
roopes v d. ; for amending of the lokks of the same carre v d. 
for sowing of the barehide of the same carre vj d. ; for lycour 
for the same carre iiij d. ; and for ij grete nailles for the 
same vj d. xvj s. Sm in all' iiij li. xvj s. 

To 1 pagine xv li. xv s. vij d." 



124 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 



" YIT EXPENSSES NECESSARIE. 

" George Luf kyn for makyng of x doublettes of blac satyn 
a doublet of purpull satyn, and a doublet of purpull velvet, 
for every doublet making with the inner stuif unto the 
same vj s. viij d. iiij t. ; for the making of iij long gownes of 
clothe of gold, iij longe gownes of velvet, and vj demy gownes 
and a shorte loose gowne of velvet and damask, for every 
gowne making iij s. iiij d.jxliij s. iiijd.; for makingofajaket 
of cloth of gold ij s. ; for making of a gowne and a hoode 
of the liveree of the Garter for the Duke de Ferrar' viij s. ; 
and for making of a mantell of blue velvett for the saide 
Duke deFerrar' garnyssht with a riche garter of ruddeur vij s.; 

" And payed for the cariage of divers bedding and stuff 
from the Coldherber into the same Warderobe atoon tyme 
iiij d. ; and for an other cariage of federbeddes and other stuff 
for the said Coldherber, and also the herber into the same 
Warderobe, and also for thecostesof a man awaiting uppon 
the same stuff vij d. 

" Payed for bystowing of many harneis of Milayn oute 
of the rayne iiij d. ; Robert Boilet for wasshing and drying 
of ix pair of shetes of divers bredes for every pair iij d., 
ij s. iij d. ; for wasshing and drying of iiij pair of fustians, 
for every pair iij d , xij d. ; for wasshing and drying of a 
blanket j d. ; for wasshing of iij rede cupborde clothes of 
rede worsted iij d. ; for wasshing of divers old peces of 
busk and of a paillett vj d. 

" Martyne Jumbard for enbrowdering and setting of 
CCCC xxvj vnces iij q of agelettes and spanges of silver 
and gilt for the garnysshing of vj coursour harneys and a 
hoby harneis of the same suyte of grene velvet for every 
unce browderyng and setting xij d. xxj 1. vj s. 'ix d, ; and to 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 125 

Gilmyn sadeller for making and lynyng of the saide vij 
barneys, for every pece xx s., vij 1. for xlix bokels of 
laton for the same barneys at iiij d. the pece xvj s. iiij d. ; 
for making and stuffing of a sadelle covered in tawny 
velvet xs. ; for v yerds of cremesy sarsinett for stuffing 
of the saide agelettes at iiij s. viij d. the yerde, xxiij s. 
iiij d. ; for vij Ib. of white threde at x d. the lb., v s. x d. ; for 
rede threde, ceringe, sowing, and making of every C of 
the said M 1 lij. xx agelettes for every C xx d. xvij s. vj d. 
for vij yerdes chaynes of laton to put in the saide ageletts 
for cutting, price of every yerde, ij d. xxiij s. iiij d. ; for the 
making and garnysshing of x hors houses that the Kinges 
highnesse and goode grace yave to my lady Duchesse of 
Bourgoingne his sister price of every pece making ix s. iiij 1. 
xs. ; for x sursengles of twyne price the pece viij d. vj s. 
viij d. 

" Richard Carter for cariage of divers parcelles 
apperteignyng unto thoffice of the Beddes caried from Lon- 
don unto Eltham xv d. and to the Kinges carreman for a 
reward awaiteng uppon certen of the Kinges books put in 
the Kinges carr viij d. and for making of iij pair hosen of 
Tranche blac cloth boght of Hastinges Pursyvant for every 
pair making with the lynyng price iijs. iiij d., xs. 

" Piers Herton for lynyng of a pair botews of blue leder 
lyned with blac velvet xx d. 

" And to Alice Claver for the makyng of xvj laces 
and xvj tasshels for the garnysshing of divers of the 
Kinges bookes ij s. viij d. ; and to Robert Boillett for blac 
papir and nailles for closyng and fastenyng of divers cofyns 
of fyrre wherein the Kinges books were conveyed and caried 
from the Kinges grete Warderobe in London unto Eltham 
aforesaid v d. ; Piers Bauduyn stacioner for bynding gilding 
and dressing of a booke called Titus Livius xx s. ; for bind- 



126 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 

ing gilding and dressing of a booke of the Holy Trinite 
xvj s. ; for binding gilding and dressing of a booke called 
Frossard xvj s. ; for binding gilding and dressing of a booke 
called the Bible xvj s. ; for binding gilding and dressing of a 
booke called LeGouvernement of Kinges and Princes xvj s. ; 
for binding and dressing of thre smalle bookes of Franche 
price in grete vj s. viij d. ; for the dressing of ij bookes wherof 
oon is called La Forteresse de Foy and the other called the 
Book of Josephus iij s. iiij d. ; and for binding gilding and 
dressing of a booke called the Bible Historial xxs. 

"John Cave for making of iij beddes of rede worsted at the 
Herber iij s.; for lyre and rynges of laton to the same iij s.; for 
hanging of the saide bedds and divers costers there ij s. ; for 
making of ij trav asses of grene sarsinett for either pece iij s. ; 
and for making of a travas with ij curtyns of grene sarsinett 
for the chapelle at Coldherber whan my Lady Duchesse 
of Bourgoingne was loged there iiij s. ; and for CC ringes of 
laton for the samexij d.; the saide PetirBaudvin for gilding 
of an old pair of claspes ij s. ; and for gilding of an old pair 
of claspes ij s. ; and for gilding of olde bolyons v s. ; and 
payed for x burdons of risshes spent in the same Warde- 
robe at divers tymes whan the Kinges highnesse and goode 
grace come thider, price with the cariage, xxij d. 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 127 



" REPARACON MAADE AND BOON IN DIVERSE TENEMENTES 
APPERTEIGNYNG AND BELONGING UNTO THE SAIDE 
WARDEROBE." 

THESE were chiefly payments to a carpenter and a smith 
for wood, iron, and labour, for the repairs of houses ; for nails, 
hooks hinges, keys, and bolts, and for the workmens wages 
two of whom are described as " Dawbers" who it appears 
received from iiij d. to vj d. a day. Among these items 
which are of no interest or importance are, " for a holowe 
key for the galary dore of the same Warderobe viij d." "for 
a newe key for a lokk of the Toure dore within the same 
Warderobe iiij d." " for a lokk and a newe key for the Kinges 
kechyn dore there viij d." " for amending of a lokk and a 
key to the porters loge dore toward the Dragon ij d. ; " for 
a plate of iren for a dore in the Quenes chamber j d." " for 
vj loodes of lyme, price of every loode x d. and the iiij" 1 
parte of a ferthing" to " Alice Veysy for cole for colouring 
of the same hous ix d." " for ij loodes of sand price the 
loode vj d.;" " and payed unto William Norton for borde naill 
and lome for cering and amending of his chambre flore 
that dust shul not falle downe uppon them that sittes and 
occupies his halle xij d." 

"To Sir Thomas Williams Person of the Parissh Chirche 
of Saint Andrewe at Baynardes Castell in London for his 
yerely pension of xl s. by the yere due unto hym by reason 
of his saide chirche and benefice in recompense of certeyn 
offeringes oblacons and emoluments unto the said benefice 
due, of the graunte of the Prince of right noble memorie 
Kyng Edward the Thirde, that is to witt, for the tyme of 
this accompte, after the rate of j d. q' by the day, xvij s. 

" To the sayde Piers Courteys whome the Kinges High- 
nesse and goode grace hath assigned and ordeigned by his 



128 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 

high commaundement to rule gouverne and kepe his said 
grete Warderobe," &c. " for the fee and revvarde of the 
said Piers Courteys belonging and apperteignyng unto his 
saide office after the rate of C li. by the yere." 

" To William Misterton clerk of the same grete Warde- 
robe for his wages of xij d. by the day." 

" To the yeoman taillours at vj d. by the day" each ; " to 
the portitour at iiij d. by the day ;" " to John Easter skinner 
for his laborious attendance in the same Warderobe and 
also for his profitable provysion and bying of furres for his 
rewarde after the rate of x li. by the yere after vj d. ob. the 
day;" 

" To Richard Huntingdon and Thomas Dancas? 
Clercs attending in the same Warderobe early and late for 
their laborious attendance in the same, and their grete 
labours, as well aboute making of many and divers enden- 
tures warrantes acquitances and billes in the same as 
overseing of werkemen, entring theire dayes and rekenyng 
and accompting the wages aswelle of divers taillours skyn- 
ners and bedmakers as of other werkemen by all the time of 
this accompte for the rewarde of either of them after the 
rate of * yerely. 

And for and in parchemyh papir ink rede wex threde 
nedels counters baggesof leder with many other smalleneces- 
sarie thinges the seide office concernyng and touching after 
the rate of Ixxvj s. viij d. by the yere." 

* In the margin is added " Ix s. p' ambobus p' temp' compi." 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 129 



STUFF REMAIGNYNG UPPON THE EENDE OFF THE LAST 
ACCOMPTE IN THE SAIDE GRETE WARDEROBE. 

XX 

WOLLEN Clothe: scarlett iiij vij yerdes di'; Clothe in 

greyne vj yerdes di'; White vvollen clothe xliij yerdes and 

iij quarters. 

Errayn : bakkes xxviij tymbr' di' xiij bakkes. 
Sables: hole vj tymbr' and ix beestes; bakkes xxvj ; 

wombes vj tymbr' di' and x. 
Bogy: skynnes blac CClxvij. 
Whyte lambe skynnes C xlv. 
Velvette : sengle ix C xij virg' j q'rt' ; double of divers 

colours C xlix di' q"rt'. 
Clothe of gold aswel upon velvet grounde as satyn grounde 

XX 

C iiij vij yerdes and iij q a rt's. 

Damask of sylke Ixxj yerdes and iij q"rt's. 

Satyn of sylke CCCCix yerdes and di' q a rt'. 

Chamelet : off ix yerdes every pece, xiij peces and a yerde 
cont' C xviij yerdes ; off x yerdes every pece, xli peces 
cont' CCCC xxx yerdes di'; of xvij yerdes and a q'rter 
every pece, x peces cont' Clxxij yerdes di' ; off xxiij 
yerdes and iij q'rt's every pece, xv peces cont' CCC 
Ixxj yerdes and a q'rt'r: conteignyng in all' ioyntly 

xx 

M 1 iiij xij yerdes and a q'rt'r. 

Sarssinette C xlviij yerdes di'. 

Purpulle clothe of silver xiiij yerdes di' q'rt'. 

Sperver of rede damask with curtyns of sarsynett j. 

Tartaryn v yerdes iij q'rt's di'. 

Curtyns of sarsynet used iij. 

Worsted : off the moost assise ij peces ; of the myddelle 
assise a pece; Cupbord clothes iiij ; Counterpoynt of the 
mooste assise j ; bedde of the moost assise j ; sperver 
of blue worstede j ; spervers of rede worsted ij. 



130 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 

Carpet j. 

Bokeram : long xxvij peces xj yerdes ; shorte cont' v yerdes 

j pece ; shorte everiche conteignyng vij yerdes di' xxvj 

peces. 

xx 

Lynnen cloth by vj elles to the C : Lawne v peces ; 
Holand clothe M M CCC Ix ; Flemmyshe clothe ij 
elles; Brussell clothe DCCvij elles iij quarters; Brownes- 

XX 1 1 XX 

wyke iiij ix elles ; Busk M M CCC iiij xiij elles and iij 

quarters of a naille ; Canvas Cxxix elles. 
Fustian xx peces xj yerdes iij q' di. 
Fustians : of iiij bredes iij pair ; off v bredes vj pair ; off vj 

bredes j pair. 
Shetes off Holand clothe, of iiij bredes viij pair ; of iij 

bredes xix pair and j shete ; off ij bredes ij pair ; Hede- 

shetes of Holand clothe vij. j-, 

Garters, with lettres of gold xvj ; with lettres off silk C xxij . 
Shetes off Flemmysshe clothe of ij bredes xvj pair; Shetes 

off Brussell clothe of ij bredes vij pair ; Shetes of busk 

of iij bredes ij pair. 
Sylk j Ib. an unce andj quarteron. 
Frenge, off sylk x Ib. x unces ; off sylk and gold ij Ib. v 

unces. 

Poyntes off ryban off sylk iij groos. 
Arras, conteignyng Cxlvj Flemmyssh elles called buscage 

ix peces ; conteignyng xlvj Flemmyssh elles called bus- 
cage ij peces. 

Quysshon clothes with ymagery of sylk xij. 
Tapicery : oft' wolle wroght called counterpoyntes of divers 

sortes conteignyng CCxlvj Flemmyssh elles ix peces ; 

chavnberyng off tapicery white and grene chekked cont' 

xx 

iiij xv Flemmyssh elles di' j. 
Tykkes iiij. 
Beddes called federbeddes stuffed with downe with their 

bolsters v. 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 131 

Federbeddes with theyre bolsters all stuffed with feders xxx. 

Pilowes off fustian stuffed with downe xxviij. 

Pilowe beres off fustian unstuffed iiij. 

Lytill bagges of fustian stuffed with ireos and anneys xxvj. 

Pilowe beres of Holand clothe xxij. 

Blankettes ij pair. 

Paylettes of busk v. 

Canvas in the Skynnery j. 

Threde xlvj Ib. and ij unces. 

Bonettes xij. 

Gloves viij dosen pair. 

Quysshons : long covered in grene velvet cloth of gold j; 
long covered in velvet of divers colours iij ; short covered 
in velvet of divers colours iiij ; short covered in grene 
velvet cloth of gold j ; square covered in tawny velvet 
ij ; uncovered ij. 

Table clothes off dyaper werk ij ; Table clothes playne iiij. 

Napkyns course of werk riij. 

Towails playne vj. 

Brusshes of hethe xij. 

Trestels iij pair and j trestell. 

Tables with iiij paire trestells iiij. 

Fourmes vij ; joynede fourmes iiij ; longe j ; short e j. 

Chayers ij. 

Cupborde of ostriche horde j. 

Stoles xvj. 

Escochons of papir in colours of the armes of Lorde George 
Ver vj. 

Double soled shoon at iiij d. the payre iiij pair. 

Spervers of ly nnen cloth iij . 

Standing glas j. 

Standisshes with weightes and scales iij. 



132 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 



THE FOREYN RECEYTE OF STUFF. 

AND the said Accomptant charges hym self frely aswelle 
of divers peces of Arras, divers federbeddes, divers 
shetes, divers peces of worsted, divers fustians, and a 
sperver of tawny damask. 

Two peces of arras of the story of Paris and Elyn ; C liiij 
elles of Holand clothe of oure saide souverayn Lorde the 
Kynges provysion by the handes of Roger Cooke servant 
unto the right high and right noble Princesse Lady 
Margarete Duchesse of Bourgoingne suster unto oure 
saide souverain Lorde the Kyng. ij federbeddes with 
bolsters unto them ; a paire of shetes of iij bredes, a 
paire of shetes of ij bredes, of Holand clothe ; ij pair of 
fustians either of v bredes ; iij peces rede worsted of the 
myddell assise ; a sperver of tawny damask ; v paire of 
shetes of Holand clothe, everiche of iiij bredes and v 
elles di' longe ; iij hedeshetes of Holand clothe, everiche 
of ij bredes arid iiij elles longe ; xiij paire of shetes of Hol- 
and clothe of iij bredes and iiij elles and a quarter longe ; 
a paire of shetes of iij bredes of Holand maade of xxv 
elles; xvj paire of shetes of Brussell cloth, wherof viij 
pair everiche of ij bredes and iij elles di' longe j and 
other viij paire of shetes of Brussell clothe, everiche of 
ij bredes and iij elles di' longe j ij travasses maade of 
grene sarsinet. 

A sperver maade of velvet ray of the colours of rede grene 
and whyte, conteignyng testour celour and valances lyned 
with busk, with ij syde curtyns and a foote curtyne of sarsi- 
net changeable, the saide sperver garnyssht with frenge of 
sylk ; an other sperver of velvet white and blue paled con- 
teignyng testour celour counterpoint and valance of the 
same lyned with blac bokeram and garnyssht with frenge 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 133 

of silk, with ij side curtyns and a foote curtyn maade of 
sarsynet white and blue, vj paire blankettes of white 
wollen clothe ; a grete paire of Fustians either of vj 
bredes and v yerdes longe ; vj paire of fustians everiche 
of iiij bredes and iij yerdes and iij quarters longe except 
ij yerdes in all. 

xxxviij yerdes of course blac satyri unto oure sayd 
Souverain Lorde, the Kyng forfaited, and seased as a 
forfaite by John Lucas of Kente; and also preysed 
by William Oriell of London mercer at v s. iiij d. every 
yerde and entrede in the bokes of oure said Souverain 
Lorde the King in bis Eschequier and amontethe unto 
the somme of xh ij s. viij d. 

A pane of scarlet made of xij yerdes of scarlet boght afore- 
hand and xxxij tymbres off ermyns used receyved of the 
Kinges Highnesse and goode grace ; two complete her- 
neys receyved of the Kynges highnesse and goode grace 
by the handes off Thomas Grafton merchant of the 
Staple of Caleys ; and of ij pair hosen made of ij yerdes 
and iij q a of Tranche blac afore here of Hastinges the 
Pursyvant boght. 



134 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 



THE TOTALL EMPCION AND EYING OF STUFF WITHIN THE 
TYME OF THIS ACCOMPTE WITH THE FOREYN RECEYTE 
OF STUFF, AND STUFF ALSO REMAIGNYNG UPPON THE 
EENDE OF THE LAST ACCOMPTE OF THE YERE PRECE- 
DENT. 

Clothe off divers sorts : Scarlet, CC ix yerdes di'; Clothe in 
greyne, xxviij yerdes di'; Clothe of divers colours, Clxx 
yerdes j quart' dj' ; White wollen clothe, xliij yerdes and 
iij quarters. 

Furres off dyvers sortes : Ermyns, newe, xxviij tymbr' di' 
and xiij bakkes; used, xxxij tymbr'; Sables, hole, vj tymbr' 
and ix bestes ; bakkes xxvj ; wombes vj tymbr' di' and 
x wombes : Bogy blac, skynnes blac CC Ixx ; furre of 
shankes blac j ; powderinges of shankes blac M M M 

xx 

CCC iiij x ; White lambe DC xlv skynnes; Fox skynnes 

of Island viij. 
Velvettes of divers sortes: sengle, M CCC xij yerdes dj' 

virg. ; double C xlix virg' dj' dj' quart'. 
Clothe of golde aswell blac of colour as of the colours 

white and grene velvet uppon velvet tisshue cloth of golde 

and other clothe of gold aswell of the grounde of velvet 

as of satyn grounde som broched with golde, CC Ixx 

yerdes and iij quarters. 
Clothe of sylver: purpull xiiij yerdes and di' quart'; blue 

uppon satyn grounde broched iij yerdes di'. 

xx 

Damask of sylk, C iiij xviij yerdes di' quarter. 

Satyn of sylk, DC xxxiij yerdes j quarter di'. 

Chamelettes, of ix yerdes every pece xiij peces and a 

yerde cont' C xviij yerdes ; of x yerdes di' every pece 

xlj peces cont' iiij C xxx yerdes di'; of xvij yerdes 

and a quarter every pece x peces cont' C Ixxij yerdes 

di' ; of xxiiij yerdes and iij quarters xv peces cont' 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 135 

XX 

CCC Ixxj virg' j q': conteignyng in alljoyntly M iiij xij 

yerdes j quarter. 
Baldekyns of silk vij peces. 
Sarsinet : sarsinettes chaungeable and other divers colours, 

DCC iiij xv yerdes and iij quarters ; Curtyns of sarsi- 

net iij. 
Spervers of damask with curtyns of sarsinet wherof j rede 

and the other tawny, ij. 
Tarteryn, j pece v yerdes iij quarters di'. 
Worsted: off the moos teassisev peces; of the myddel assise 

xiij peces ; off the leeste assise yj peces ; Cupbord 

clothes iiij ; Counterpoynt of the moost assise j ; of 

the moost assise bedde j ; Sperver of blue worsted j ; 

Spervers of rede worsted ij ; Celours of worsted iij. 
Carpetj. 
Bokeram : longe xxvij peces xj yerdes ; shorte cont' v 

yerdes j pece ; shorte everiche cont' vij yerdes di' xxvj 

peces. 

XX 

Lynnen cloth after vj elles to the C : Lawne v peces ; Hol- 
and clothe M M CCC Ixix ell' di' et j nayll'; Flemysshe 
clothe ij elles ; Brussell clothe DCCvij elles and iij 
quarters. 

xx 

Browneswyk, iiij ix elles. 

Busk, M M CCC iiij xiij elles iij q' of a naill'. 

Canvas, C xxix elles. 

Fustian, xx peces xj yerdes iij quarters di'. 

Fustians, of iiij bredes ix pair ; of v bredes viij pair ; of 
vj bredes ij pair. 

Shetes off Hoi and clothe: of iiij bredes xiij pair; of iij 
bredes xxxiiij pair and a shete ; of ij bredes iij pair; 
Hedeshetes of Holand clothe x; Shetes of Flemmyssh 
clothe, off ij bredes xvj pair ; off Brussell clothe, shetes, 
off ij bredes xxiij pair; Shetes off busk cloth, of iij 
bredes ij pair. 



136 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 

Spervers off velvet garnyssht with frenge of silk : off velvet 
with curtyns off sarsinett oon of ray velvet and an other 
of velvet blue and white ij. 

Travasses maade of grene sarsynet ij. 

Garters : with lettres of gold xvj ; with lettres of silk C xxij ; 
off ruddeur richely wroght with silk and gold j. 

Sowing sylk, j Ib. ij unces and a quarter. 

Riban off silk : streyte xj unces di' ; brode ix yerdes weying 
v unces di' quarter. 

Riban of silk for poyntes laces and gyrdels iiij unces. 

Riban of silk and golde j unce. 

Laces made of ryban of silk: ij dosen laces and a double 
lace of riban of silk weying ij unces di' ; Mantell lace of 
blue silk with botons of the same j. 

Poyntes: made of ryban of silk iij groos; made of ryban 
of silk weying j Ib. ij unces iij quarterons di', xl dosen. 

Frenge : of sylk xv Ib. vj unces and a quarteron : of sylk 
and gold ij Ib. v unces ; of Venys gold xj unces di'. 

Corses of sylk with laces and tassels of sylk and botons off 
sylk and gold : of blue sylk weyng an unce iij quarterons 
di', ij yerdes di' and a nail ; of blac silk weying iij unces 
iiij yerdes di' di' quart' ; of silk for laces and tassels, vj 
unces and iij quarterons ; botons of blue sylk and golde 
xvj. 

Arras : cont' Cxlvj Flemmyssh elles and a quarter called 
buscage ix peces ; cont' xlvj Flemmyssh elles called 
buscage ij peces ; of the story of Parys and Eleyn ij 
peces; counterpoint of arras with ymagery and silk, 
cont' xxx Flemmyssh elles j ; counterpoint of arras with 
ymagery without silk cont' xxx Flemmyssh elles j. 

Rosses embroudered ; grete viij, small xlviij. 

Quysshons off arras with ymagery and sylk xij. 

Tapicery, off wolle wroght with ymagery called counter- 
pointes of divers sortes cont' CClvj Flemmyssh elles ix 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 

peces ; chambering of tapicery white and grene chek- 

xx 

ked cont' iiij xv Flemmyssh elles di', j ; counter- 
pointes of verdours without silk everiche cont' xxx 
Flemmyssh elles vij. ; counterpointes of verdours of 
wolle everiche cont' xx Flemmyssh elles vj ; costeringes 
of wolle paled rede and blue with rooses sonnes and 
crounes in every pane, wherof two peces either cont' Ix 
Flemmyssh elles and either of the other ij peces cont' 1 
Flemmyssh elles, and a counterpoint cont' xx Flem- 
myssh elles, v peces. 

Tykkes, iiij; gretej; myddellj. 

Federbeddes : stuffed with downe with bolsters longing 
unto the same v ; stuffed with feders with bolsters belong- 
ing unto the same xxxviij. 

Downe CCC lib. 

Pilowes stuffed with downe xxviij ; Pilowe beres of fustian 
unstuffed iiij ; Pilowberes of Holand clothe xxij. 

Lytill bagges of fustian stuffed with ireos arid anneys xxvj. 

Blankettes viij paire. 

Pailettes of busk v. 

Canvas in the Skynnery j. 

Threde of divers colours Iviij Ib. di' and iiij unces. 

Ryban of threde xiij unces. 

Corde and lyour Cxv Ib. di'. 

Gloves viij dd' pair. 

Quysshons : long, covered in grene cloth of gold j ; longe, 
covered in velvet of divers colours iij ; shorte, covered 
in velvet of divers colours iiij ; shorte, covered in grene 
cloth of gold j ; square, covered in velvet tawny ij ; 
uncovered ij. 

Hosen vi paire xj paire.* 

* The words in italics were afterwards added. 

T 



138 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 

Sokkes of fustian, iiij paire. 

Shoon double soled and not lynede : blac, v paire wherof iiij 
pair everiche paire at iiij d. the paire ; blac v paire 
Spaynyssh leder ij paire. 

Shoon sengle soled and not lynede : blac j paire, iiij d ; 
Spaynyssh leder iiij paire, v d. ; j paire, vj d. ; blac vij 
paire xij d. ; tawny Spaynyssh leder ix paire. 
Sloppes off divers sortes : blue, j paire ; Spaynyssh leder, 
iiij paire ; tawny leder, v paire ; rede Spaynyssh leder, a 
paire at xviij d. the paire; of by yond the see leder 
a paire, vj d. ; blac leder a paire, v d. : Sloppes of blac 
leder not lined, ij paire ; Sloppes off divers sortes and 
divers leders lined with blac clothe, blac j paire ; Spay- 
nyssh leder ij paire ; russet a paire ; tawny a paire ; 
rede Spaynyssh leder a paire : Sloppes of divers sortes 
and divers leders lyned with velvett; Spaynyssh leder, 
vj paire ; blue leder, a paire ; grene leder, a paire. 

Slippers, iij paire. Item ij par' hatche.* 

Patyns of leder, ij paire. 

Botewsoff divers sortes and divers leders; tawny Spaynyssh 
leder, a paire ; blac leder above the knee, vij paire ; 
blac sengle unto the knee ij paire ; rede Spaynyssh 
leder above the knee iij paire ; tawny leder above the 
knee viij paire. 

Bootes, blac leder a paire; rede Spaynyssh leder a paire; 
tawny Spaynyssh leder a paire. 

Spurres parcell gilt : longe, a paire ; shorte, a paire. 

Hattes of wolle, v. 

Bonettes, xix. 

Ostriche feders, xj. 

Rynges of laton, iiij. 

* The words in italics were added afterwards. 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 139 

Smalle gilt naill', CC. Item other CCC gylt nayles.* 
Crochettes : off the moost assise, C ; of the myddell assise, 

CCC ; of the leest assise, DCC. 
Tapethokes, D. 
Tentourhokes, CC. 
Clovehamer, j. 

Table clothes of diaper werk, ij ; table clothes playne, iiij. 
Napkyns of werk course, viij. 
Towails playne, vj. 
Brussb.es of hethe, xij. 
Trestels, iij paire and a trestelle. 
Tables with iiij paire trestels, iiij. 
Fourrnes: joyned, iiij; longej; shortej. 
Agelettes of silver and gylt and spanges of silver and gilt 

weying in all, CCCCxxvj unces and iij quarterons. 
Claspes of coper and gilt, vj paire. 
Bolyons of coper and gilt, Ixx. 

* The words in italics were added afterwards. 



140 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 



FOR THE OFFICE OFF THE BEDDES WITHIN THE MOOST 
HONORABLE HOUSEHOLD OF CURE SAIDE SOUVERAIN 
LORDE THE KYNG, RECEYVED liY THE HANDES OFF PIERS 
WRATON YOMAN OFF THE SAME OFFICE OFF THE BEDDES. 

To oure said Souverayn Lorde tbe King to have 
into thoffice of his Beddes within his moost honourable 
householde divers stuff and bedding as may playnly appere 
by an endenture of papir thereof made bering date the 
xvj day of May the xx li yere of the inooste noble reigne 
of oure said Souverain Lorde the Kyng. And also by 
vertue of a warrant aswelle undre oure said Souverain 
Lordes signe manuell as undre his signet bering date the 
second day of Juyne the said xx" yere of oure said Souve- 
rain Lordes moost noble reigne unto the said Piers Curteys 
directe for the deliveree of the said stuff and bedding. 
And over this busk delivered for lynyng of divers peces of 
arras corde and Hour for liring and lowping of the same 
arras ; and for hanging of a curtyne of paled verdour rede 
and blue with riban of grene threde and rynges of latone 
by vertue of the warrant aforesayd : federbeddes xij with 
bolsters to them stuffed with feders; shetes of Holand 
clothe, v paire every of iiij bredes ; a paire of ij bredes ; 
blankettes iij paire ; fustians ij pair everiche of v bredes ; 
a paire of iiij bredes ; pilowe, j of fustiane stuffed with 
downe and a here of Holand clothe therunto ; busk Clxx 
ell' iij q'. di' after the grete C; corde and Hour Iv Ib ; 
riban, v unces of grene threde; rynges, xxx of laton. 

Delivered for to make off v peire of shetes of Holand 
clothe everiche of iiij bredes and v elles di' longe ; iij 
hede shetes of Holand clothe everiche of ij bredes and iiij 
elles longe ; xiij paire of shetes of Holand clothe everiche 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 141 

of iij bredes and iiij elles and a quarter longe ; a paire of 
shetes of Holand clothe of iij bredes made of xxv elles; 
viij paire of shetes everiche of ij bredes and iij elles di' 
quarter longe of Brusselle clothe; and viij paire of shetes, 
everiche of ij bredes and ij elles di' longe, 

Brussell cloth Dlx elles ; D elles di' Holand clothe. 

Delivered unto Rauff Dovvell' unto the Erber for 
the logeing of the ambassiatours of Bourgoingne iij peces 
of rede worsted of the moost assise, wherof was made iiij 
costers and iij counterpointes for iij beddes in iij chambres 
there ; and also delivered unto the same Rauff for the same 
logeing vj peces rede worsted of the myddelle assise, wherof 
was made iij newe testours to iij celours that were boght of 
William Shukburgh and delivered to the same Rauf, and 
there were made also of the saide vj peces of rede worsted 
of the myddelle assise ix curtyns to iij beddes in the saide 
iij chambres and costers for ij of the saide iij chambres; 
and the saide iij old testours that; were taken of from the 
saide elours were made into iij cupbordclothes, alle whiche 
stuff of worstedes remaigne stil there, for the logeing 
nowe of M r . John Wode nowe undretresorer of England, 
by vertue of a warrant utidre the Kinges signet and signe 
manuelle bering date the xxiiij day of Juylle, in the xx u 
yere of the moost noble reigne of oure said Souverain 
Lorde the King, 

Worsted : iij peces of the moost assise ; vj peces of 
the myddelle assise ; iij celours ; pilow of fustiane and here 
of Holand cloth ; j stuffed with downe with a bere of 
Holand clothe therto. 

Delivered unto the Manoir of Grenwiche and Cold- 
herber ayenst the commyng tbider of my Lady Duchesse 
of Bourgoingne ij paire shetes of iiij bredes; a paire of 



142 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 

shetes of iij bredes ; a paire of fustians of iiij bredes ; a 
paire of blankettes ; iij peces rede worsted of the myddelle 
assise ; ij peces of arras of Paris and Eleyn ; ij travasses of 
grene sarsinet; and delivered to make of the same ij 
travasses xlvij yerdes of grene sarsinett garnissht with v 
unces di' riban of grene silk, by vertue of a warrant under 
the Kinges signet and signe manuelle bering date the 
xxiiij day of Juylle in the xx t * yere of the moost noble 
regne of oure saide Souverain Lorde the Kyng within the 
tyme of this Accompte, 

Sarsinette xlvij yerdes grene, in ij traves ; riban of silk, 
v unces di' streite ; arras ij peces of the story of Purys and 
Eleyn ; shetes of Holand clothe ij paire everiche of iiij 
bredes ; a paire of iij bredes ; fustians, a paire of iiij 
bredes ; blankettes, a paire ; rede worsted, iij peces of the 
myddelle assise : counterpoint, j of xx Fleminyssh elles. 

Deliverede for to make of a sperver of ray velvet of 
the colours grene rede and white, the testour made of x 
yerdes of the saide velvet, the celour of the same made of 
ix yerdes of the same velvet, and the valance of the same 
made of iij yerdes a quart' di' of the same velvet, and the 
saide sperver lyned with xj elles busk. An other sperver 
made of velvet white and blue paled, the testour made of x 
yerdes, the celour made of ix yerdes, the valance made 
of iij yerdes j q' di' of the same velvet, and perfourmed 
with iij quarters of whyte satyne. And the counterpoint of 
thes am e sperver made of xxx yerdes, and the saide sperver 
lined thorough oute with blac bokeram and either sperver 
with ij side curtyns, and a foote curtyne of sarsinet of the 
colours according unto the said spervers, the same spervers 
bound with riban of grene threde sowed with silk and 
garnyssht with frenge of sylk, 

Velvet, xxij yerdes j q' di' ray of divers colours ; Iij 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 143 

yerdes a quarter di' blue and white; satyne, blue and white, 
iij quarters of a yerde white ; sarsinette, xxj yerdes di' 
chaungeable, xxij yerdes white and blue ; busk, xj elles; 
bokeram longe, iij peces ; silk, iij unces di' di' q' of divers 
colours; frenge of silk of divers colours/ iij Ib. iiij unces iij 
q'; riban of threde di' Ib. ; thredej Ib. of divers colours. 

To cure said Souverayn Lorde the Kyng to have 
into th'office of his Beddes within his rnoost honourable 
household dely vered to Windesore by the Kynges high com- 
maundement by the handes of Thomas Frysley Ix yerdes 
of^scarlet for to make of divers costeringes, by vertue of a 
warrant undre the Kynges signet and signe manuelle bering 
date the xvj day of August in the xx tl yere of the mooste 
noble reigne of oure said Souverain Lorde the King unto the 
said Piers Courteys for deliveree of the said stuff directe, 
Scarlet, Ix yerdes. 

To oure said Souverain Lortle the King to have 
into thoffice of his Beddes within his moost honourable 
household, a grete large federbedd and the bolster therunto 
stuffed with downe ; v tapettes of verdours with crownes 
and roses paled blue and crymysyn ; a sperver of ray 
velvet of the colours grene rede and white, conteignyng 
testour celour and valance of the same suyt, lined with 
busk and frenged with frenge of silk of divers colours, with 
ij syde curtyns and a fote curtyn of sarsinet chaungeable ; 
an other sperver of velvet white and blue, conteignyng 
testour celour valance and counterpointe of the same, lyned 
with blac bokeram and frenged with frenge of silk, and the 
valence of the sperver of velvet white and blue and par- 
fourmed with white satyn ; a paire of fustians of vj bredes 
and ij peire fustians either of v bredes ; iiij peire of shetes 



144 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 

of Holand clothe everiche of iiij bredes and v elles longe ; 
xliiij yerdes of rede sarsinett for divers curtyns and ij hede- 
shetes either of ij bredes and ij elles longe, by vertue of a 
warrant undre the Kinges signet and signe manuelle bering 
date the xvij day of August in the xx" yere of the vnoost 
noble reigne of oure said Souverain Lorde the Kyng unto the 
saide Piers Courteys for deliveree of the said stuff directe, 

Federbedde : A grete bedde with a bolster thereunto 

stuffed with down; tapettes other wise called costeringes, 

v of verdoures with crownes and looses paled blue and 

crymysyn ; spervers, oon of ray velvet of the colours grerie 

rede and white with curtyns of chaungeable sarsinet ; oon 

of velvet white and blue with curtyns of sarsinet ; fustians, 

a paire of vj bredes ; ij peir everiche of v bredes ; shetes, 

iiij paire everiche of iiij bredes and v ell' long ; hedeshetes, 

, either of ij bredes and ij elles long : sarsinet rede, xliiij 

yerdes for divers curtyns ; rynges, cli' C of latone. 

Delivered to make of a travas of grene sarsinett and 
ij curtyns for the Chapelle of my lady Duchesse of Bour- 
goingne atColdherber whiche was lost there, by vertue of a 
warrant under the Kinges signet and signe manuelle bering 
date the xxiiij day of Juylle the said xx" yere, 
Sarsinett xiij yerdes di' di' quarter grene. 

Delivered for the garnysshing of a chaier for oure saide 
Souverain Lorde the King garnyssht with riban of silk 
and gold and gilt nayles, by vertue of the saide warrant 
bering date the xxiiij day of Juylle the said xx" yere, 

Riban of silk and gold j unce ; nailes gilt, CC smalle. 

Delivered for to make of vj paire of blankettes, white 
wollen clothe xviij yerdes; white threde j unce. 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 145 

Delivered to make of a grete paire of fustians of vj 
bredes, and vj paire of fustians everiche of iiij bredes and 
iij yerdes and iij quarters longe except ij yerdes lakking in 
alle, 

Viij hole peces of fustiane except ij yerdes in alle. 

Delivered for the conveying and trussing of ix worthy 
gentilwomen, embroudered, 
Busk xxx elles. 

Delivered unto Piers Wratone yoman of the beddes 
within the moost honourable household of cure said Sou- 
verain Lorde the King whan he went to the Grace Dieu 
and from thens unto Caunterbury, 

Shetes of Holand cloth : a paire of iij bredes ; a paire 
of ij bredes. 

Delivered also to the Coldherber ayenst the commyng 
thider of my lady Duchesse of Bourgoine for the apparail- 
lyng of the logeing there, di' C grete crochettes CC myd- 
del crochettes and iiij C smalle crochettes, and for th'ap- 
paraillyng of the Erber ayeust the commyng thider of th' 
ambassiatours of Bourgingne, C crochettes of the leest assise 
CCC tapethokes and CC tentourhokes, 

Crochettes, di.' C of the moost assise ; CC of the myddel 
assise ; D of the leest assise ; tapethokes CCC ; tentour 
hokes CC. 



146 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 



FOR THE OFFICE OFF THE ROOBES WITHIN THE MOOST 
HONORABLE HOUSEHOLD OF OURE SAID SOUVERAIN 
LORDE THE KYNG. 

To oure said Souverain Lorde the Kyng. A longe 
gowne made of blue clothe of gold uppon satyn grounde 
emaylled, and lyned with grene satyne ; a doublet made of 
blac satyne lyned with Holand clothe and busk ; and ij elles 
of busk and di' elle of Holand clothe for lynyng of Bother 
doublettes; a demy gowne made of tawny velvett lyned 
with blac damask; a demy gown made of blac velvet 
lyned with purpulle satyne ; a demy gowne of grene velvet 
lyned with blac damask ; and iiij tipettes made of blac 
velvett ; and over this other stuff necessarie, as sloppes of 
divers leder; shoon of divers leder ; patyns ofleder; Coleyn 
threde delivered into the Tailloury for taillours to lyne arras 
and verdours with, and a lb' of threde delivered into the 
Skynnery for skynners to wirk with, by vertueof a warrant 
under the signet of oure said Souverain Lord the Kinges 
armes signed with his owne handes bering date the xj day 
of May in the xx u yere of the mooste noble reigne of oure 
said Souverain Lorde the Kyng unto the saide Piers Curteys 
by oure said Souverain Lordes highnesse for the deliveree 
of the saide stuff directe. 

Velvet, xxiij yerdes di' of divers colours; blue cloth of 
gold, x yerdes di' uppon satyne grounde emayled ; blac 
damask, xij yerdes; satyn, xxij yerdes and a quarter of 
divers colouis; Holand clothe, ij elles; busk, iij elles; 
threde, ij lb' colen, di'lb' white, j lb' of threde for skynners ; 
sloppes, ij paire of Spanyssh leder not lyned, a paire of 
Spaynyssh leder lined with clothe, j payre of blac leder 
lyned; a paire of blac leder not lyned; shoon, a paire of 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 147 

Spaynyssh leder sengle soled and not lined; ij paire of blac 
leder sengle soled and not lined; patyns, j paire of blac 
leder. 

To oure saide Souverain Lorde the Kyng to have into 
th'office of his Roobes within his mooste honorable house- 
hold divers stuff by vertue of a warrant undre the Kinges 
signe manuelle and signet bering date the second day of 
Juyn the xx li yere of the moost noble reigne of oure said 
Souverain Lorde the Kyng unto the saide Piers Curteys 
direct for the deliveree of the said stuff, 

Blac velvet, a yerde for lynyng of ij paire sloppes of 
Spaynyssh leder and of divers botews; botews, a paire 
botews unto the knee of blac leder; a pair above the 
knee of blac leder ; v paire of Spaynyssh tawny leder ; a 
paire of blue leder; sloppes, ij paire lined with blac velvet, 
a paire of tawny Spaynyssh leder, viij pair of Spaynyssh 
leder not lined ; shoone, iij pair of Spaynyssh ledder 
sengle soled, ij paire of by yond see leder sengle soled ; 
patyns, j pair of leder. 

To oure said Souverain Lorde the Kyng, a demy gowne of 
purpulle velvet, double sett lyned withgrenesarsinette; ajaket 
of blue clothe of gold emayled not lined, and oon elle di' of 
Holand clothe for to make of necessarie thinges for the 
Kynges medicyns, by vertue of a warrant undre the Kinges 
signe manuelle and signet bering date the xix day of Juyl 
in the xx u yere of the moost noble reigne of oure said Sou- 
verain Lorde the Kyng unto the saide Piers Court eys 
direct for deliveree of the said stuff, 

Velvet purpulle, vj yerdes di' double sett ; cloth of gold 
emayled, ij yerdes blue ; sarsinett, iij yerdes grene ; Holand 
clothe j elle di'. 

To oure saide Souverayn ij doublettes of blac satyne ; 



148 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 

a longe gowne of blac velvett lined with tawny damask ; 
a demy gown of grene velvet chaungeable lined with 
blac sarsinette; a longe gowne of white damask furrid 
with fyne sables; a doublet of purpulle satyn and a doublet 
of crymysyn velvet both lined with Holand clothe and in- 
terlined with busk; ij stomachers of blac satyn; half a 
yerde of blac velvet for lynyng of ij paire of sloppes; 
xxiiij sheries of Holand clothe ; xxiiij brest coverchieffes 
of Holand clothe ; and xlviij handcoverchieffes of Holand 
clothe ; an ostriche feder ; ij paire hosen of puke ; iiij paire 
sokkes of fustian and a paire of hunting spurres parcelle gilt ; 
ij paire of sloppes lined with velvet, blac ; iij paire of 
slippers ; a paire of botews of blac leder doubled soled 
above the knee ; iij paire of botews of blac leder above the 
knee; a paire botews of blac leder; a paire of botews 
above the knee of rede Spaynyssh leder ; a paire of botews 
of tawny leder ; a paire of shoon of Spaynyssh leder ; ij 
paire shoon of tawny leder ; a paire shoon of blac leder 
double soled ; a paire shoon double soled not lined ; and 
iiij paire of shoon of blac leder sengle soled ; by vertue of 
a warrant undre the Kynges signe manuelle and signette 
bering date the xxiiij u day of Juyll in the xx u yere of the 
mooste noble reigne of oure said Souverain Lorde the 
Kyng unto the saide Piers Courteys directed for the 
deliveree of the said stuff, 

Velvett, xxij" yerdes of divers colours ; damask of silk, 
xx yerdes and iij quarters di' of divers colours ; satyn of 
silk, ix yerdes and iij quarters of divers colours; sarsinett 
blac, iiij yerdes ; Holand clothe, Cix elles ; busk, iij elles ; 
sable bakkes, vj tymbre di' xiiij ; ostriche feder, j ; hunting 
spurres, j paire parcelle gilt ; sloppes, ij paire lyned with 
blac velvett ; slippers, iij paire ; botews, a paire above the 
knee of blac leder double soled ; iij paire of blac leder 
above the knee ; j paire of blac leder ; a paire of rede 
Spanyssh leder above the knee; a paire of Spaynyssh 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 149 

leder tawny ; shoone, a paire of Spaynyssh leder, ij paire 
of tawny leder, a paire of blac leder double soled, a 
paire double soled not lined, iiij paire of blac leder sengle 
soled ; hosen, ij paire of puke ; sokkes, iiij paire of fustiane. 

To oure saide Souverayn Lorde the Kyngalonge gowne 
of grene velvet upon velvet tisshue cloth of gold, and a 
longe gowne of white velvet upon velvet tisshue cloth of gold, 
both gownes lined with blac satyn ; j unce and a quarteron 
of grene tbrede for the same ; a doublet of blac satyn 
lined with Holand clothe and busk, and to have of divers 
thinges necessarie as more plainly apperith in the utter 
margyne by vertue of a warrant undre the Kinges signet 
and signe manuelle bering date the vj the day of August 
the xx" yere of the moost noble reigne of oure said Souve- 
rain Lord the King unto the saide Piers Courteys direct, 

Tisshue clothe of gold, xxj yerdes di' of grene and 
white velvet upon velvet; satyn blac, xxvj yerdes; threde 
grene, j unce j quarteron ; Holand clothe, j elle j q' ; 
busk, j elle di' ; laces of silk, xiiij laces of riban of silk ; 
pointes of silk, viij dosen ; riban of silk, vij yerdes brode 
riban of silk for girdels ; shetes of Holand cloth, a paire of 
iij bredes ; blankettes, a paire ; hosen, ij paire ; bonettes, 
ij ; gloves, xviij paire ; brusshes, iij of heth. 

To oure said Souverayn Lorde the Kyng a demy 
gowne of grene velvet and a gowne of grene damask, bothe 
gownes lyned with blac satyn, ij tipettes of blac velvet, 
ij hattes vj bonettes, by vertue of a warrant undre the 
Kinges signet and sign manuelle bering date xvij day of 
August in the xx u yere of the mooste noble reigne of oure 
said Souverain Lorde the Kyng unto the saide Piers Cour- 
teys for the deliveree of the said stuff directe, 

Velvet, vj yerdes j quart' of divers colours ; damask, vj 
yerdes grene ; satyn, xj yerdes di' ; hattes ij ; bonettes vj. 



150 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 

To cure saide Souverain Lorde the King a loose 
gowne of purpulle velvet double sette lined with blac satyn, 
a doublet of blac satin made and lined accordingly with 
a base of a jaket and a stomacher, both of blac satyn ; 
a loose gowne of purpul clothe of gold upon satin grounde 
furred with ermyns ; a loose gowne of velvet upon velvet 
blac clothe of gold furrid with ermyns ; a streite gowne of 
crymysyn clothe of gold uppon satyn grounde lined with 
blac satyn, and a doublet of blac satyn ; a pane of scarlet 
furrid with used ermyns di' yerde of purpul velvet forto 
lyne with an hatt by the bordure; a paire of long spurres 
parcelle gilt. Delivered also unto Richard Andrewe 
hosier iij yerdes and iij quarters puke forto make of iij 
paire of hosen, and to have into the said office of the 
Roobes within oure saide Souverain Lordes the King moost 
honourable household the parcels of stuff ensuyng, that is 
to say, iiij paire of shetes of Bruselle clothe everiche of 
ij bredes; iiij hattes of wolle; viij bonettes; a groos pointes 
of sylk of divers colours; xxiiij laces of silk of divers 
colours ; viij yerdes di' brode riban of silk for girdels ; and 
xij combe coverchieffes everiche of an elle of Holand clothe, 
Scarlet xij yerdes ; puke, iij yerdes iij q' ; ermyns, vj 
tymbre di', xvj bakkes newe, xxxij tymbre bakkes used ; 
velvet double sett, v yerdes ; pouderinges, iij MCCCiiij x; 
clothe of golde ix yerdes di, uppon satin grounde purpulle 
and crymysy; tisshue cloth of gold, iiij yerdes di' blac 
velvet upon velvet; satyne blac, xvj yerdes and a naille ; 
Holand clothe, xix elles di' ; busk, an elle ; shetes of Brus- 
selle cloth, iiij paire of ij bredes ; spurres, a paire longe 
parcelle gilt ; hattes iiij of wolle ; bonettes viij ; pointes, 
a groos of silk of divers colours; laces xxiiij of silk of divers 
colours ; brode riban, viij yerdes di' of silk. 

To oure saide Souverayn Lorde the Kyng to have 
into the office of his Roobes within his moost honourable 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 151 

householde ; a clooke rnaade of blac chamelet lyned with 
blac clothe, and the cape lyned with blac velvet ; ij tipettes 
made of blac velvet ; ij par' of grene hosen and ij paire 
hosen of blac puke. And to have of divers stuff necessarie 
into the said office for the store and were of oure said 
Souverain Lorde the King the parcels of stuff hereafter 
named, that is to vvitt, vj brusshes of hethe ; di'lb' of white 
threde ; di' lb' of Bruges threde ; ij paire of botews sengle 
above the knee of Spaynyssh leder and tawny leder; ij 
paire of botews of Spaynyssh rede leder ; a paire of blac 
botews sengle above the knee ; iij paire of sloppes of 
tawny leder and Spaynysshe leder; iij paire sloppes of rede 
Spaynyssh leder of divers sortes ; a paire of sloppes of blac 
leder not lined ; a paire sloppes of blue Spaynyssh leder 
not lined ; and a paire of sloppes of tawny Spaynyssh leder 
lined with velvett ; iiij paire of shoon of blac leder of divers 
sortes ; and ij paire of shoon of Spaynyssh leder double 
soled of divers sortes ; a paire shetes of Brusselle clothe 
for foteshetes of ij bredes; a paire of botews of blac leder 
double soled above the knee, 

Blac clothe, iiij yerdes ; blac velvet, ij yerdes and 
iij q'; chamelett, xvj yerdes di' quarter parcelle of a 
pece cont' xvij yerdes di' ; hosen, ij paire grene, ij paire 
blac puke ; brusshes, vj of heth ; threde, di' lb' white, 
di' lb' blue Bruges ; botews of divers leders and divers 
sortes, ij paire sengle soled above the kne of Spay- 
nyssh leder and tawny leder ; ij paire of rede Spaynyssh 
leder ; a paire of blac sengle soled above the knee ; j 
pair of blac leder double soled above the knee; sloppes 
of divers leders and divers sortes, iij paire of tawny 
leder and Spaynyssh leder; iij paire of rede Spaynyssh 
leder of divers sortes ; a paire of blac leder not lined ; a 
pair of blue Spaynyssh leder not lined, a paire of tawny 
Spaynyssh leder lined with velvet ; shoon of divers leders 



152 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 

and of divers sortes, iiij paire of blac leder of divers sortes, 
and ij paire of Spaynyssh leder double soled of divers 
sortes ; shetes, j par' of ij bredes of Brusselle clothe ; bootes, 
a paire of rede Spaynyssh leder, a paire of tawny Spay- 
nyssh leder, a paire of blac leder. 

Delyvered for the coveryng and garnysshing vj of 
the Bookes of oure saide Souverain Lorde the Kinges, 
that is to say, oon of the Holy Trinite, oon of Titus Ly vjus, 
oon of the Gouvernal of Kinges and Princes, a Bible, a 
Bible Historialle, and the vj the called Frossard, 

Velvet, vj yerdes cremysy figured ; corse of silk, ij 
yerdes di' and a naille blue silk weying an unce iij q' 
di'; iiij yerdes di' di' quarter blac silk weying iij unces; 
laces and tassels of silk, xvj laces; xvj tassels, weying to 
gider vj unces and iij q' ; botons, xvj of blue silk and 
gold ; claspes off coper and gilt, iij paire smalle with roses 
uppon them; a paire myddelle, ij paire grete with the 
Kinges armes uppon them ; bolions coper and gilt, Ixx ; 
navies gilt, CCC. 



* 

KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 153 



FOR TH OFFICE OF THE STABLE. 

Delivered for to lyrie with a foote cloth of velvet iij 
yerdes of long blac bokeram, unto Joh'n Cheyne Squier 
for the body of oure said Souverain Lorde the King and 
Maister of his Hors; receyved by the handes of Joh'n 
Frysley clerk of the Kinges Stable by vertue of a warrant 
under the Kinges signet and signe manuelle bering date 
the xxiiij" day of Juylle in the xx tl yere of the mooste noble 
reigne of oure said Souverain Lorde the King unto the 
saide Piers Curteys for the deliveree of the saide bokeram 
directe, 

Bokeram longe, iij yerdes blac. 

Delivered for covering and making of xvij hors har- 
neys of grene velvett, wherof vij barneys for coursours and 
oon harneys for an hoby, alle garnyssht with agelettes of 
silver and gilt and bordured with spanges of silver and 
gilt the saide vij harneys lyned with blac bokeram, by 
vertue of a warrant under the Kinges signet and signe 
manuelle bering date the xxvj day of Juylle in the xx" yere 
of the moost noble reigne of oure said Souverain Lorde 
the King unto the saide Piers Curteys for the deliveree of 
the said stuff directe : and viij yerdes of cry mysy velvet 
for covering of x hedstalles and x broderayns for x hobyes 
and palfreys the whiche the Kinges highnesse and goode 
grace yave unto my lady Duchesse of Bourgoingne, 

Velvet : viij yerdes cry mysy ; xvij yerdes di' grene ; 
bokeram longe, xvij yerdes di', boght by yond the see ; 
agelettes, M 1 Iij of silver and gilt weying CC Ixxj unces 
and iij quarterons ; spanges, of silver and gilt 

weying Civ unces. 

x 



154 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 

Delivered for the covering of a sadelle and an herneys 
in russet velvet cloth of gold for an hakeney, and a foote- 
clothe maade of russet velvet lyned with blac bokeram, by 
vertue of a warrant under the Kinges signet and signe 
manuelle bering date the second day of Septembre in the 
xx ti yere of the moost noble reigne of oure said Souverain 
Lord the King unto the saide Piers Courteys for the de- 
liveree of the said stuff directe, 

Velvet, iij yerdes russet ; velvet cloth of gold, ij yerdes 
di' russet ; bokeram longe, v yerdes. 

Deliverede for the covering of a sadelle of astate ij yerdes 
of purpul velvet clothe of golde, by vertue of a warrant 
undre the Kinges signet and signe mauuelle beringe date 
the xj day of Septembre in the xx yere of the moost noble 
reigne of oure said Souverain Lorde the Kyng unto the 
saide Piers Courteys for deliveree of the saide stuff directe, 
Purpulle velvet clothe of gold, ij yerdes. 

Deliverede for covering of iiij saddles and iiij harneys, 
wherof iij saddles and iij harneis covered in blac velvet, 
and a sadel and a harneis covered in grene velvet; and 
iiij foteclothes of velvet lyned with bokeram, wherof iij of 
blac velvet and oon of grene velvet, by vertue of a warrant 
undre the Kinges signet and signe manuelle bering date 
the in the xx tt yere of the moost noble 

reigne of oure said Souverain Lorde the King unto the 
said Piers Courteys for deliveree of the said stuff directe, 

Velvet, xxxij yerdes grene and blac ; bokeram longe, 
xij yerdes.* 

* Here follows in the MS. a general Inventory of all the articles mentioned 
in the preceding pages, entitled " The foote of the deliveree of stuff," 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 155 



YIFTES YEVEN ASWELLE UNTO THE RIGHT HIGH AND 
MYGHTY PRYNCE THE DUKE OF YORK, SON UNTO OURE 
SAYD SOUVERAYN LORDE THE KYNG, AS UNTO OTHER 
DIVERS LORDES AND ASTATES AND OTHER DIVERS PER- 
SONES BY THE KINGES HIGHNESSE AND GOODE GRACE. 

To the right high and myghty Prynce the Duke of 
Yorke, son unto oure said Souverayn Lord the Kyng for 
covering of an harneys and a sadelle for hym, by the 
vertue of a warrant undre oure saide Souverain Lordes the 
Kinges signet and signe manuelle bering date the xxviij" 
day of Aprille the xx u yere of his mooste noble reigne unto 
the said Piers Courteys for deliveree of the said stuff 
directe, 

Velvet cremysy, j yerde di' ; velvet uppon velvet grene 
clothe of golde, j yerde and a quarter. 

George Lufkyn Sergeant taillour of the grete Warde- 
robe of the Kyng oure saide Souverain Lorde to have the 
parcelles of stuff here in the lower margin specified for 
to make of certeyn garmentes for the apparaille and arraye 
of a warde unto the Kinges highnesse and goode grace 
apperteignyng and belonging, by vertue of a warrant undre 
oure said Souverain Lord the Kinges signet and signe 
manuelle bering date the xj day of May the xx yere of 
oure said Souverain Lorde the King moost noble reigne, 
unto the said Piers Courteys for deliveree of the said stuff 
directe, 

Chamelet, vij yerdes violet, a pece blac ; satyn, vj 
yerdes blac ; velvet, iiij yerdes blac ; bokeram longe, a 
pece ; Holand clothe, an elle ; busk, ij elles. 



156 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 

To the Lorde Howard to have of the yift of cure saide 
Souverayn Lorde the Kyng, by vertue of a warrant bering 
date the xij day of May the xx u yere of the mooste noble 
reigrie of oure said Souverain Lorde the King unto the 
saide Piers Courteys directe, 

Blac velvet, ix j'erdes. 

To the College off oure Lady or chapelle of oure Lady and 
Saynt George within the Castelle of Windesore, to have of 
the yifte of oure said Souverain Lorde the King the parcelles 
of silke here in the margyne named, by vertue of a warrant 
bering date the xxiiij day of May the xxyere of the mooste 
noble reigne of oure said Souvesain Lorde the King unto 
the saide Piers Curteys for the deliveree of the saide silkes 
directe, 

Velvet of divers colours : xv yerdes of white velvet with 
blac spottes ; xxvij yerdes of blue velvet with braunches ; 
xix yerdes of blac velvet with white spottes; xj yerdes 
iij quarters white velvett braunched. 

To the right highe and myghty Prince Richard Duke 
of York to have the parcelles of silkes hereafter named, 
receyved by Sir Thomas Grey Knyght his chamberleyne, 
that is to witt, v yerdes of blac satyn and v yerdes of pur- 
pulle velvet for lynyng of the same gown ; v yerdes of grene 
satyn for a gowne, and ij yerdes di' of blac sarsinett for 
lynyng of the same gowne, by vertue of a warrant bering 
date the second day of Juyne the xx u yere of the mooste 
noble reigne of oure said Souverain Lorde the King unto 
the saide Piers Courteys for the deliveree of the said stuff 
directe, 

Velvet purpulle, v yerdes ; satyn, x yerdes ; blac sarsi- 
nett, ij yerdes di'. 



KINO EDWARD THE FOURTH. 157 

To th'Erle off Warrewyk to have for his were and use, 
iiij peire of shoon double soled and a peire of shoon of 
Spaynyssh leder sengle soled, by vertue of a warrant undre 
the Kinges signe manuelle and signet bering date the 
second day of Juyn in the xx u yere of the moost noble 
reigne of our said Souverain Lorde the King, 

Shoon : iiij paire double soled ; a payre of Spaynyssh 
leder sengle soled. 

To George Grey son and heyre of th'Erle of Kent, to 
have of the yift of oure said Souverain Lorde the Kyng 
ayenst the mariage of the same George, a gowne of blue 
velvet lyned with blac satyn, a gowne of cryinysy velvet 
lyned with blac satyn, and a demy gowne of blac velvet 
lyned with blac satyn, by vertue of a warrant undre the 
Kinges signe manuelle and signet bering date the xxvj 
day of Juyn in the xx u yere of the moost noble reigne of 
oure Souverain Lorde King Edward the mj tbe , 

Velvet of divers colours, xxvij yerdes ; satyn blac, xxvij 
yerdes. 

Edward Stanley oon off the cupberers of oure said Sou- 
verain Lorde the King to have of the yift of the Kinges 
highnesse and goode grace ix yerdes chamelet, v yerdes of 
sarsinette, ij yerdes of tawny satyn, and ij yerdes of blac 
satyn, by vertue of a warrant undre the Kinges signe 
manuelle and signett bering date the ix day Juylle in the 
xx" yere of the moost noble reigne of oure said Souverain 
Lord the King, 

Chamelet, ix yerdes; satyn, iiij yerdes; sarsinett, v 
yerdes. 

To Dame Anne Wyngfeld to have of the yift of oure 
said Souverain Lorde the Kyng, x yerdes of blac velvet 



158 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 

serigle, by vertue, of a warrant under the signe manuelle and 
signette of oure said Souverain Lorde the Kyng bering 
date the xv day of Juylle in the xx tl yere of the raoost 
noble reigne of oure said Souverain Lorde the Kyng unto 
the said Piers Courteys for deliveree of the said x yerdes of 
velvet directe, 

Velvet, ix yerdes sengle. 

To the Colleg off Wyndesore to have of the yift of 
oure said Souverain Lorde the Kyng xxx yerdes iij quarters 
white damask with floures, of divers colours ; and to William 
Berkeley and Joh'n Rysley to either of hem ij yerdes of 
tawny satyn, by vertue of a warrant undre the Kinges 
signet and signe manuelle bering date the xix day of Juylle 
in the xx 11 yere of the moost noble reigne of oure said 
Souverain Lorde the Kyng unto the saide Piers Courteis 
for deliveree of the saide stuff directe, 

Damask, xxx yerdes and iij quarters white with floures 
of divers colours ; satyn, iiij yerdes tawny. 

To the saide College off Wyndesore to have of the yift 
of oure saide Souverain Lorde the King xiij yerdes rede 
velvet tisshue cloth of gold ; xiij yerdes blue velvet tisshue 
cloth of gold ; xiij yerdes white velvet tisshue cloth of gold ; 
and vij peces bawdekyns of silk, by vertue of a warrant undre 
the Kinges signet and signe manuelle, bering date the 
xxij tl day of Juylle in the xx tl yere of the moost noble 
reigne of oure said Souverain Lorde the Kyng unto the 
saide Piers Courteis for deliveree of the said stuff directe, 

Velvet, tisshue cloth of gold, xxxix yerdes of divers 
colours ; bawdekyns of silk, vij peces. 

To th'Erle of Warrewyk to have of the yifte of oure said 
Souverain Lorde the Kyng for his use and were, a peire of 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 159 

shoon sengle soled of blue leder; a paire of shoon of 
Spaynyssh leder ; a paire botews of tawny Spaynyssh 
leder ; and ij paire shoon sengle soled ; and to Sir William 
A Parre Knyght to have of the yift of oure said Souverain 
Lorde the King for covering of his brygandyns, iij yerdes 
and iij quarters of crymysyn cloth of gold uppon satin 
grounde ; and unto the Maister off the Kinges Barge ayenst 
the commyng of the righte high and right noble Princesse 
Lady Margarete the Duchesse of Bourgoingne suster unto 
our saide Souverain Lorde the Kyng, a gowne of blac 
chamelet, by vertue of a warrant undre the Kynges signet 
and signe manuelle bering date the xxiiij u day of Juylle in 
the xx" yere of the moost noble reigne of oure said Sou- 
verain Lord the Kyng unto the saide Piers Courteys for 
deliveree of the said stuff direct, 

Cremysyn clothe of gold the grounde satyn, iij yerdes iij 
quarters ; chamelet, ix yerdes di' ; Shoon j j paire sengle of 
blue leder ; a paire of Spaynyssh leder sengle soled ; ij 
paire blac ; Botews, j paire of tawny Spaynyssh leder. 

To the saide College off Wyndesore to have of the yift 
of oure said Souverain Lorde the Kyng, xx yerdes blue 
velvet, and xx yerdes of purpulle velvet, by vertue of a warrant 
undre the Kinges signet and signe manuelle bering date 
the vj day of August in the xx u yere of the mooste noble 
reigne of oure saide Souverain Lorde the Kyng unto the 
saide Piers Courteys for deliveree of the said stuff directe ; 
and over this unto oure Souverayn Lady the Quene and to 
Lady Elizabeth the Kinges doughter for ij gownes for them 
had of the Kynges yift, by vertue of an other warrant bering 
the same date, xv yerdes of grene tisshue clothe of gold, 
by vertue of the saide warrant here above reherced, 

Velvet, xl yerdes of blue and purpulle ; tisshue cloth of 
gold, xv yerdes grene. 



160 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 

To the Argenter off Fraurice to have of the yift of oure 
saide Souverain Lorde the King xij yerdes of scarlet, and xij 
yerdes of violet in greyne, and Ixvj yerdes and iij quarters of 
blac velvet, and xij yerdes of clothe of silver hached uppon 
satyn grounde, by the Kinges highriesse and goode grace 
yeven unto divers astates and gentils, being attending and 
awaiting uppon the person of the right high and right noble 
Princesse Lady Margaret Duchesse of Bourgoingne suster 
unto oure said Souverain Lorde the Kyng, by vertue of a 
warrant undre the Kinges signet and signe manuelle bering 
date the xvj day of August in the xx' 1 yere of the moost 
noble reigne of oure saide Souverain Lorde the Kyng unto 
the said Piers Courteys for the deliveree of the saide stuff 
directe, 

Scarlet, xij yerdes; violet in greyne, xij yerdes; velvet, 
Ixvj yerdes and iij quarters; clothe of silver, xij yerdes 
hached uppon satyne grounde. 

To the righte highe and right myghty Prince Edward by 
the grace of God Prince of Wales Duke of Cornwayle 
and Erie of Chester, the firstbigoten son of oure said 
Souverayn Lorde Kyng Edward the iiij the , to have of the 
yift of oure said Souverain Lorde the Kyng, v yerdes of 
white cloth of golde tisshue for a gowne, by vertue of a 
warrant undre the Kinges signet and signe manuelle bering 
date the xvij day of August in the xx li yere of the inooste 
noble reigne of our said Souverain Lorde the Kyng unto 
the said Piers Courteys for the deliveree of the said clothe of 
gold directe, 

White clothe of gold tisshue, v yerdes. 

To the right high and myghty Prince the Duke of 
York, son unto 'oure said Souverain Lorde the Kyng, to have 
of the yift of his highnesse and goode grace, v yerdes of 



KINO EDWARD THE FOURTH. 11 

purpulle velvet for a gowne ; v yerdes of grene velvet for a 
gowne; iiij yerdes di' of grene damask for a gowne; a 
yerde di' of grene satyn ; ij yerdes di' of tawny sarsinet, 
and v yerdes of white cloth of gold for a gowne, by vertue 
of a warrant uudre the Kinges signet and signe manuelle 
bering date the xvij day of August in the xx" yere of the 
moost noble reigne of oure said Souveraiu Lorde the Kyng 
unto the saide Piers Courteys for the deliveree of the said 
stuff direct, 

Velvet, x yerdes purpulle and grene; damask, iiij 
yerdes di' grene ; satyne, a yerde di' grene ; sarsinet, 
ij yerdes di' tawny ; tisshue cloth of golde, v yerdes white. 

To the same right high and myghty Prince the Duke 
of York to have of the yift of oure saide Souverain Lorde 
the Kyng a inantelle of blue velvet lined with white damask 
garnissht with a garter of ruddcur and a lase of blue silk 
with botons of golde, by vertue of a warrant undre the 
Kinges signet and signe manuelle bering date the saide 
xvij day of August in the saide xx u yere of the inoost 
uoble reigne of oure saide Souverain Lorde the King unto 
the said Piers Courteys for deliveree of the said mantel, 

Velvet, vij yerdes blue ; damask, vj yerdes white ; 
garter, j of ruddeur ; lace, j of blue silk with botons of 
golde. 

To the right noble Lordes the Marquies Dorset and 
ih'Erle Ryviers. to have of the yift of our said Souverain 
Lorde the Kyng to either of hem iij yerdes white tisshue 
cloth of gold for j short gowne, by vertue of a warrant 
undre the Kinges signet and signe manuel bering date the 
said xvij day of August in the said xx li yere of the inoost 
noble reigne of oure sayde Souverain Lorde the Kyng unto 



THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 

the said Piers Courteys for deliveree of the said clothe 
of- gold directe, 

Tisshue clothe of gold, vj yerdes white. 

To the Lorde off Audeley to have of the yift of oure 
said Souverain Lorde the Kyng for covering of a peire of 
brygandyns, by way of rewarde, by vertue of a warrant 
undre the Kinges signet and signe manuelle bering date the 
xxiiij" day of August in the xx" yere of the moost noble 
reigne of oure said Souverain Lorde the Kyng unto the 
said Piers Courteys for deliveree of the said clothe of golde, 
-.'-> Clothe of gold, ij yerdes crymysyn uppon satyn 
grounde. 

To John Grantfforde oon of the yomen off the Crown to 
have of the Kinges graunte xij yerdes of scarlet to perfourme 
the Kinges pleasire and to delivere it unto suche personnes 
as the Kinges highnesse hath yeven hym in commaunde- 
ment, by vertue of a warrant undre the Kinges signet and 
signe manuelle bering date the last day of August in 
xx" yere of the mooste noble reigne of oure saide Sou- 
verain Lorde uiito the said Piers Courteys for deliveree 
of the said scarlet direct, 

Scarlet, xij yerdes. 

To Sir Thomas Montgomery and Sir Thomas Borough 
Knyghtes for the Body, to have of the yift of oure saide 
Souverain Lorde the Kyng for the covering of theire 
brygandyns, that is to say, to the said Sir Thomas Mont- 
gomery ij yerdes and a quarter of cremysin clothe of gold 
upon satin grounde in stede of damask grounde ; and to 
the saide Sir Thomas Borough ij yerdes di' of crymysyn 
clothe of gold uppon satyn grounde in stede of damask 
f rounde, by vertue of a warrant undre the Kinges signet 





KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 163 

and signe manuelle bering date the last day of August 
in the xx 11 yere of the moost noble reigne of oure said 
Souverain Lord the King unto the saide Piers Courteys for 
the deliveree of the saide cloth of gold directe, 

Crymysyn cloth of gold uppon satyn grounde, iiij yerdes 
and iij quarters. 

To the Lorde Marquies and th'Erle Ryvers to have of 
the yift of oure said Souverain Lorde the King to either 
of them ij yerdes di' purpulle clothe of gold uppon satyn 
grounde, 

Purpulle cloth of gold upon satyn grounde, v yerdes. 

Delyvered for to make off a pilion for the right high and 
right noble Princesse Lady Margarete Duchesse of Bour- 
goingne suster unto oure said Souverain Lorde the King 
to her delivered ayenst her going into Flaundres ayen, 

Clothe of gold, iij yerdes and a quarter blue and pur- 
pulle ; bokeram, ij yerdes ; frenge, vj unces di' of blue and 
purpul silk ; frenge, xj unces di' of Venys gold. 

And to divers off the Kynges servantes aswelle of his 
mooste honourable Chambre as other divers Officers of divers 
of his Offices and other divers men by the Kinges highnesse 
and goode grace assigned and appointed to attende and 
awaite uppon the conveying and bringing over the see of 
the right high and right noble Princesse Lady Margarete 
Duchesse of Bourgoingne suster unto oure said Souverayn 
Lorde the Kyng to have of the Kinges yift ayenst the 
same tyme, jakettes of wollen clothe murrey and blue, 
the names of whiche personnes hereafter ensue and folowe: 

William Rither and a man to awaite uppon hyin, either 
of hem ajaket of blue and murrey clothe; George Chey- 
newe and a man to awaite uppon hym, to either of hem a 



164 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 

jakett of blue and murrey clothe; Thomas Thwaytes a 
jaket of blue and murrey clothe ; Richard Bunteyn and a 
man to awayte uppon him, to either of them a jaket of 
blue and murrey clothe; Rauf Newham a jakett of blue 
and murrey clothe ; Oly vere Guyon a jaket of blue and 
murrey ; William Acham, Thomas Philippe, Roger Riche- 
mond and a man to awayte uppon hym, Davy Morice, 
John Coket, Humfrey Reynforde, John Kendale, Thomas 
Fremanne, Henry Walker, Richard Scopeham, Edmond 
Mille, James Worseley, William Kyghley, Rauf Dowelte, 
Richard Cartemaille, John Davy of Fowy, Richard Leder, 
Thomas Brampston, William Parker, John Walforde, 
John Greyson, John Hamerton, Henry Sambrooke, 
Thomas Pyne, John Asteley, Thomas Granford, John 
Lightfoote, John Besteney, James Warner, John Wil- 
shawe, Thomas Hullok, Henry Langtone, Nicholas Whit- 
feld, John Nevelle, William Dobinson, Thomas Dobinson, 
John More, John Guylle, John Hudde, William Peny, 
John Conner, John Jewelle, Thomas Jackson, Richard 
Tod and a man to awaite uppon hym, Richard Halle, 
William Grenerigge, Thomas Heywode, Thomas Stan- 
hope, Davy Fyssher, Robert Bray, Thomas Sparovve, John 
Hovy, William Thorneton, Thomas* Ryder, Thomas 
Smythson, and Osberne Walyngton, x servauntes of Sir 
Edward Wydevile Knyghte, iiij servantes of Sir James 
Ratclif Knyght, ij servantes of Tayes, and ij servantes of 
Barcy, a servant to awaite uppon Thomas Dobinson and 
William Dobinson, to everiche of hem a jaket of murrey 
and blue cloth : 

And also unto Parker of Dover, Robert Wilson, 
Thomas Ustewayte, John Apris, Geffrey Chirke, iiij men 
to awaite upon William Berkley, and iiij men to awaite 

* This word hat been entwd. 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 165 

uppon Thomas ap Roger Vaghan, to everiche of hem a 
a jaket of murrey and blue : 

zx 

iiij vij persones - 

f C persones in alle. 
xiij persones J 

Clothe murrey and blue, C yerdes. 



To Sir Edward Wydevile and to Sir James Radcliff, 
Knyghtes for the Body of oure saide Souverain Lorde the 
Kyng, to have of his yift ayenst the conveyance and 
bringing over the see of the right highe and right noble 
Princesse Lady Margarete Duchesse of Bourgoingne sus- 
ter unto oure said Souverain Lorde the Kyng, to either of 
theyme a yerde of velvet purpulle and a yerde of blue 
velvet for theire jakettes to be made of: 

And to Darcy and Tay, Squiers for the Body of our* 
said Souverain Lorde the King, ayenst the saide convey- 
ance of the saide right highe and right noble Princesse, to 
either of theym, for theire jakettes, a yerde of purpul 
satyn and a yerde of blue satyne, by vertiie of a warrant 
undre the Kinges signet and signe manuelle bering date 
the xviij day of Septembre in the said xx" yere of the 
said moost noble reigne of our said Souverain Lorde th 
King unto the said Piers Courteys for the deliveree of the 
said stuff direct; and to either of the said Darcy and 
Tay an barneys complete ; and to William Berkley and 
Thomas ap Roger Vaghan, to either of hem, for theire 
jakettes a yerde of purpulle satyn and a yerde of blue 
satyn, by vertue of the same warrant: 

Velvet, ij yerdes purpulle, ij yerdes blue ; satyn, iiij 
yerdes purpulle, iiij yerdes blue ; harneya, ij complete. 

To Thomas Hatthe oon off oure wardes to have the 
parcelles of stuff here after ensuyng of the yift of oure 
said Souverain Lorde the Kyng for his apparaille and 



166 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 

arraye, that is to witt, a long gowne of russet clothe furrid 
with white lambe, a longe gowne of chamelet furrid with 
bogy shankes and bogy, a demy gowne of russet lined 
with blac clothe, a doublet of velvet, a doublet of chamelet, 
a jaket of blac satyne, iij tipetes of blac velvett, a hatte, 
ij bonettes, iiij paire of hosen, poyntes laces aud riban of 
silk for girdelles weying in alle iiij unces, di' groos of leder 
poyntes, iiij paire of shoon, ij paire of slippers, a paire of 
botews, and viij elles of Holand clothe for shertes stomach- 
ers and coverchieffes, by vertue of a warrant undre the 
Kinges signet and signe manuelle, bering date , 

Blac clothe, a yerde di' ; russet clothe, iij yerdes iij 
quarters di' ; white lamb, xxxij skynnes ; bogy, a furre of 
blac shankes, iij skynnes blac ; velvet, ij yerdes di' blac ; 
satyn, a yerde blac ; chamelet, viij yerdes blac ; riban of 
silke, iiij unces for girdels pointes and laces ; Holand clothe, 
viij elles ; hosen, iij paire ; bonettes, ij ; hatt, j of wolle ; 
poyntes, di' groos of leder ; shoon, iiij paire sengle soled 
blac ; slippers, ij paire ; botews, a paire. 

Delivered unto the maister of the Kinges barge aud 
unto xxiiij bargemen to make of xxv jakettes garnyssht 
with smalle rooses enbroudered ; and unto iiij other per- 
sones to have of the Kinges yift viij grete roses enbrou- 
dered ayenst the commyng to London of the right high and 
right noble Princesse Lady Margarete Duchesse of Bour- 
goingne sustere unto oure saide Souverain Lorde the Kyng, 
Clothe, blue and murrey, xvj yerdes ; roses enbroudered, 
xlviij smalle, viij grete. 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 167 



THE FOREYN AND OWTWARDE DEL1VEREE OF STUFF 
FOR THAPPARAILLE OFF THE SAYDE MAISTER AND VIJ 
HENXEMEN. 

To John Cheyne Squier for the Body of oure said Sou- 
verain Lorde the King and Maister of his Henxmen for 
th'apparaille of the saide Maister and vij of the Kinges 
Henxemen ayenst the feste of Midsomer in the xx li yere of 
the mooste noble reigne of oure saide Souverain Lorde 
the King, by vertue of his warrant undre his signet and 
signe manuelle bering date the xxix" day of May in the 
said xx" yere of oure said Souverain Lorde the King 
mooste noble reigne unto the saide Piers Curteys for 
deliveree of the said stuff directe, that is to witte, viij 
longe gownes maade of vij peces purpulle chamelett and 
of a pece of blac chamelett, lined with xxxij yerdes of blac 
sarsinett ; and also xxxij yerdes of blac sarsinet delivered 
for lynyng of viij longe gownes of wollen clothe, and xvj 
yerdes di' of blac satyn, and xvj yerdes di' of tawny satyn, 
for xvj doublettes for the said maister and vij Henxemenne, 
Satyne, xxxiij yerdes ; chamelet, viij peces ; sarsinet, 
Ixiiij yerdes. 



168 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS OF 



FOB TH'APSAKAILLE OFF THE KYNGES* FOTEMBN. 

To Robert Hert and John Topffeld the Kynges fate- 
men, for theire apparaille, by vertue of a warrant undre 
the Kinges signet and signe manuelle bering date the xviij 
day of Juylle the xx tl of the moost noble reigne ofamre 
saide Souverain Lord the Kyng to the said Piers Curteis 
direct, asmuche velvet and chamelet as shalbe necessarie 
to make of ij doublettes for either of them ; and also 
asmuche velvette and ehamelet as shalbe necessarie 
for two jakettes for either of them, 

Velvet, iiij yerdes di' blac, iij yerdes purpalle and blue ; 
chamelet, viij yerdes di' of divers colours. 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 169 



THE SOMER CLOTHING OF DIVERS OFFICERS. 

To the saide Piers Courteys whome the Kinges high- 
nesse and goode grace hath assigned and ordeigned by 
his highe commaundement to rule gouverne and kepe 
his saide grete Warderobe, and al his goodes beyng within 
the same, unto his moost honourable use safly to keepe, 
and to make into the same his grete Warderobe provysion 
ot all maner of stuff necessarie to and for his use and other 
personnes at his said high commaundement, and to make 
oute of the same his saide grete Warderobe deliveree of 
stuff at alle tymes necessarie by his said high commaunde- 
ment, aswel for his moost royalle person as for all other 
personnes at his said high commaundement, for his liveree 
of clothing for the feste of Witson tyde in the xx 11 yere of 
the mooste noble reigne of oure said Souverain Lorde the 
Kyng, that is to witt, x yerdes of violet in greyne and a 
pece of tartaryn, 

Violet in greyne x yerdes, tartaryn j pece. 

William Mistertone clerc of the same grete Warde- 
robe for his Somer clothing for the said feste of Witson 
tyde the said xx u yere of the moost noble reigne of oure 
said Souverain Lord King Edward the iiij th % iiij yerdes of 
Mustrevilers, 

Mustrevilers clothe, iiij yerdes. 

William Dunkam oon of the yomanne taillours of the 
same grete Warderobe, for his liveree of clothing for the 
season of Somer for the fest of Witsontyde, the said 
xx ti yere of the moost noble reigne of oure said Souverain 
Lorde the King, iiij yerdes of Mustrevilers. 

William Halle oon of the yomen taillours of the same 

z 



170 THE WARDROBE ACCOUNTS, & C . 

grete Warderobe for his liveree of clothing for the season 
of Somer for the feste of Witsontyde, the said xx li yere of 
the mooste noble reigne of oure said Souverain Lord the 
King, iiij yerdes of Mustrevilers, 

Thomas Stanes Portitour of the same grete Warderobe, 
for his liveree of clothing for the season of Somer for the 
fest of Witsontyde the said xx" yere of the mooste noble 
reigne of oure said Souverain Lord the King, iiij yerdes of 
Mustrevilers. 

Richard Huntingdon and Thomas Dancaster clerkes, 
erly and late attending in the same Warderobe, for theire 
liveree of clothing for the season of Somer for the feste of 
Witsontyde the said xx 1 ' yere of the mooste noble reigne 
of oure saide Souverain Lorde the King, to either of them 
iiij yerdes of Mustrevilers. 

To the Rentgeder of the mansions and tenementes 
apperteignyng and belanging unto the same Warderobe 
for his hole rewarde for gadering of the said rente and for 
the overseying of the reparacion of the same Warderobe, 
and of the said mansions and tenementes, for his Somer 
liveree ayenst the fest of Witsontyde the said xx u yere of 
the moost noble reigne of oure said Souverain Lord the 
King, that is to witt, for alle the tyme of this accompt, 
Mustrevilers clothe, iiij yerdes. 

Richard Sheldone and John Clerk, auditors of th' Es- 
chequier of oure saide Souverain Lorde the King, to either 
of hem for theire Somer liveree, iij yerdes of Mustrevilers 
clothe ; and betwix them a yerde and iij quarters grene 
clothe for half a countingclothe, 

Clothe Mustrevilers, vij yerdes and iij q\ 



INDEX AND NOTES 

TO THE 

PRIVY PURSE EXPENSES 

OF 

ELIZABETH OF YORK, 



Z 2 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



ABINGDON, 51 52, 53, 56, 58, 
59, 71, 74. 

The queen appears to have heen 
at Abingdon about the 8th Octo- 
ber, 1502. 

Acworth, Thomas, 18, 30, 45, 
62, 93, 97, 104, 109. 
Apparently one of the officers of 
the queen's household, connected 
with the department of the sta- 
bles, the expenses of which he paid. 

Adington, Robert, 93. 

A tailor. 
Ale, for, 79. 

Almond butler brought, 2. 

A usual present on Good Friday, 
when common butter was not 
permitted to be eaten. In the 
ancient cookery temp. Richard the 
Second, published by the Society 
of Antiquaries in 1790, is this re- 
ceipt for making " Botyr of Al- 
mones. Take almonde mylk and 
let hit boyle, and in the boyling 
cast therto a lytel wyne or vine- 
gar, and when it is sothen take 
and cast it on a canvas abrode, 
tyl it be colde, then take and geder 
it togeder and hang it up in a 
cloth a lytel while, then lay it in 
colde water and serve it forthe." 
D. Paid " in rewarde for a dish 
of almon butter presented on Good 
Friday, iij *.," occurs in the 
household expenses of Thomas 
Kytson, Esq., in 1575. Gage's 
History and Antiquities of Hen- 
grave, p. 206. 

Almoner, the king's, 42. 

- the queen's, 31, 33, 67, 97. 
Richard Payne, clerk. See 
PAYNE. 

Almorys, for, 96. 

" Cibutum," in the Promptorium 



Parvulorum, in the Harl. MS., 
221, is translated by an " almery 
of inete kepyng, or a save for 
mete ;" and Palsgrave, in Les- 
clarcissement de la Langue Fran, 
coys, in 1530, has " almery to put 
meat in, unes almoires." It ap- 
pears, however, from this entry, 
that almories were applied to 
other purposes than for meat, as 
in this instance they were used 
for books : " and within the said 
feretory on both north and south 
side there were ambries of fine 
wainscot, varnished and finely 
painted, and gilt over with fine 
little images very beautiful to be- 
hold, for the reliques belonging 
to St. Cuthbert to lye in." The 
Ancient Riles of the Church of 
Durham, G. 

Alms, money given in, 1, 5, 12, 
23, 30, 32, 33, 37, 38, 50, 52, 
56, 59, 62, 67, 78, 85. 
The whole amount expended "in 
almous " was only 9/. 11s. 5</., 
which was distributed in small 
sums in the queen's progresses, in 
gifts to old servants of her family, 
or in the gratification of any sud- 
den benevolent impulse. The 
practice of giving alms on jour- 
nies was common with all persons 
of any consequence. " Delivered 
to my Mrs. to give by the way in 
her little purse." Gage's History 
of Hengrave, p. 203. 

Altar cloths, for working on, 82, 
83. 

Altar cloths were frequently 
richly embroidered, sometimes 
with the name of our Saviour, 
sometimes with the Order of the 
Garter, the arms of the donor, &c. 
Rich robes and vestments were 
often bequeathed to be made into 



174 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



altar cloths. Royal Wills and Tet- 
tamenta Vetusta. 

Alyn, Robert, 29, 35, 36, 41, 
49, 53, 57, 58, 70, 71, 95. 
Yeoman Usher of the queen's 
chamber. 

Anchoress, an, 67, 102. 

A female am horite In the 1 8th 
Edw. II. a piece of ground, in 
St. Peter's, Cornhill, London, 
which the parishioners had in- 
closed and built upon, is said to 
have been then the residence of 
an anchoress ; and in the 4th 
Edw. IV. " Alice Ripas Ancho- 
ryse, inclused withynne the Cha- 
pell of St. Eleyn of Pountefret," 
was protected by the Act of Re- 
sumption in the enjoymentof 40s., 
which had been granted to her 
by the king's letters patent. Rot. 
Part. i. 419 ; v. 546 b . 

Antill, 47. 

Ampthill, in Bedfordshire. See 
a note in the Privy Purse Ex- 
penses of Henry VI1L, p. 295. 

Anne, Lady, 9, 79, 94, 99. 

The queen's sister, who married 
Thomas Lord Howard, son and 
heir apparent of Thomas, Earl of 
Surrey (afterwards second Duke 
of Norfolk). She had issue two 
sons, both of whom died infants. 
In the Privy Purse Expenses of 
Henry VIL, on the 4th February, 
1495, is an entry of 6s. 8rf., being 
paid as the king's offering at her 
marriage, which nearly fixes the 
date of that event. See also Rolls 
of Parliament, vi. 479, 511. 
Anthem, for setting an, 2. 

Antyne, William, 21. 
A coppersmith. 

Apothecary, John Eyrce, 49. 
Apothecary's bills, 8, 48. 
Apples brought, 4, 13, 30, 47, 

53, 74. 

Arbour, an, made in the Little 
Park at Windsor, 31. 
Apparently from the price, 4s. 8d., 
an arbour made of twigs only. 

Arrerages, i. e. Arrears, 109. 
Arrows, for a sheaf of, 58. 



Arthur, Mr., 100. 

One of the queen's servants. 

Arundel, Earl of, 40. 

Thomas Fitzalan, K.G. He suc- 
ceeded to the earldom of Arundel 
in 1487, and married the queen's 
aunt, Margaret, daughter of 
Richard Wydeville, Earl Rivers, 
by whom he had, among other 
issue, William, his son and suc- 
cessor, and a daughter, Margaret, 
who married her majesty's first 
cousin, John de la Pole, Earl of 
Lincoln, son of Elizabeth Duchess 
of Suffolk, sister of Edward IV. 
The Earl died in 1524. 

Askew, Christopher, 20, 80, 104. 

One of the queen's servants. 
Attorney in the Common Pleas, 
101. 

William Mordaunt. See MOR- 



the King's, 101. 

James Hobert. See HOBERT. 

Auditor, the Queen's, 101, 102. 
Richard Bedell. See BEDELL. 

Aulferton, Oliver, 94, 100. 

Keeper of the Queen's Goshawks. 

Aurum Reginae, 111. 

" An ancient perquisite, belong- 
ing to every queen consort during 
her marriage with the king, and 
due from every person who hath 
made a voluntary offering or fine 
to the king, amounting to ten 
marks or upwards, for and in 
consideration of any privileges, 
grants, licenses, pardons, or other 
matter of royal favour conferred 
upon him by the king ; and it is 
due in proportion of one tenth 
part more, over and above the 
entire offering or fine made to the 
king, and becomes an actual debt 
of record to the queen's majesty, 
by the mere recording of the fine." 
" In the reign of Hen. II. the 
manner of collecting it appears to 
have been well understood, and 
it forms a distinct head in the 
ancient Dialogue of the Exche- 
quer, written in the time of that 
prince. From that time it was 
regularly claimed and enjoyed 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



175 



by all the queens consort of 
England until the death of 
Henry VIII. ; though, after the 
accession of the Tudor family, 
the collecting of it seems to have 
been much neglected," which 
agrees with the fact of no sum 
being entered under that head in 
these accounts. " There being no 
queens consort afterwards, until 
the accession of James I., the 
nature and quantity of the queen's 
gold became matter of doubt, and 
on the subject being referred to 
the Judges, their report was so 
unfavourable to the queen's claim, 
that she never exacted it." In 
the 1 1 th Car. I., the king, on the 
petition of Queen Henrietta 
Maria, issued his writ for levying 
it ; but afterwards purchased it 
of her for 10,000/., " finding it, 
perhaps, too trifling and trouble- 
some to levy ;" and since that 
time no attempt has been made 
to collect this revenue, the value 
of which was nearly destroyed by 
the abolition of military tenures 
at the Restoration. Blackstone 1 a 
Commentaries, i. 220, 222. 

Avvdeley, Thomas, 10. 
A mercer of London. 

Axe, an, bought, 63. 

Axletrees, bought, 103. 

Bailly, Richard, 56. 

Yeoman of the Queen's chamber. 
- Robert, 6. 

One of the servants of Lord 
William Courtenay. 

Baiting horses, for, 79. 

Bangham, Lady Jane, 98. 

This person had a son, named 
Edward Pallet, who was brought 
up at the queen's expense, in the 
house with her Majesty's nephews 
the young Lords Courtenay ; but 
the cause of his being so favoured 
does not appear. In the privy 
purse expenses of Henry VII. are 
entries of a payment of 2/. on the 
10th January, 1496, to a woman 
of Thistleworth, for keeping of 
my Lady Jane Bongham's child 
until the Easter following ; and 
from entries on the 1st April, 13 
Hen. VII., 15 March, 14 Hen. 



VII., and 1 Aug. 15 Hen. VII., 

it seems that she was allowed 31. Gs. 
per annum for the purpose. The 
following entry in those accounts 
on the 8th July, 1501, tends to 
explain the circumstance of the 
king's charging himself with the 
expense of one of this Lady's 
children: " To Agnes Adams, 
for kepyng and berying of Henry 
Boagham, the king's godson, 
I/. 6s. 8d." Her other son, Ed- 
mond Pallett, was adopted by the 
queen. 

Banquet, an arbour made in 
Windsor Park, for a banquet 
for the queen, 31. 

Baptiste, Elizabeth, 99. 

Fraunceys, 100. 

Two of the Queen's servants. 

Barbour, Piers, 90. 

One of the servants of Henry VII. 
Among the extracts from the 
privy purse expenses of that 
monarch, in the Additional MS. 
7099, in the British Museum, 
are entries of payments to Piers 
Barbor, for wine and gloves ; of 
8s. paid him in January, 1503, 
" for one that makes the king a 
roll of his armes," and of a pay- 
ment by him, of 9/. 6*. Qd. to 
Mrs. Eleanor Johns, &c. 

Barge, the Master of the, 94. 
Lewis Walter. See WALT EH. 

Barehides, for mending and li- 
quoring, 15, 16, 37. 
Barehides were hides used as co- 
verings of packages, clothes, &c. 
Katherine Lady Hastings, by her 
will in 1503, gave her son " three 
barrehides for carriage ; and two 
barrehides for cloth sekks." In 
the Privy Purse Expenses of Henry 
Fill. p. 182, is an e"ntry of 81. 
" for a bare hyde to cover the 
king's barge;" and in the Ward- 
robe Accounts of Edward IV., p. 
1 23, " for sowing of the barehide 
of the king's car." 

Barge, the : notices of the queen 
being conveyed in her barge, 
and the expenses attending it, 
6, 7, 15, 24, 60, 61, 73, 85, 
94, 95 
Like her son, Henry VIII., and 



176 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



earlier sovereigns, the queen fre- 
quently moved by water from Rich- 
mond to Greenwich, and part of 
her suite attended her in other 
boats. See a note in the Privy 
Purse Expenses of Henry Fill. 
p. 298. The whole amount spent 
from March, 1502 to Feb. 1503, 
for conveying the queen and her 
suite by water, was 13/. Is. 4d., 
being about 2/. on each occasion. 
The situation of master of the 
royal barge was one of some im- 
portance ; and in the Act of Re- 
sumption 1 Henry VII., Robert 
Savage was protected in the 
grant of the office of master of 
the king's barge. Rot. Par/, vi. 
377- In the same year John 
Calcote, citizen and painter, son 
of " John Calecote, late of Lam- 
beth, and maister of the barge to 
the most Christian Prynce, King 
Henry the VI 1 ., late King of 
England," obtained the reversion 
of his father's attainder. Lewis 
Walter was the queen's barge- 
man. See WALTER. 

Barge, for tallowing and dress- 
ing the queen's, and for ropes, 
&c., for, 15, 81. 

Barking, i.e., Berking in Essex, 
Lady of, 4, 102. 

Barton, Sir William, a priest for 
singing, and for going on a 
pilgrimage for the queen, 3, 
102. 

, Thomas, 23. 

One of the queen's footmen. 

Baskets, for, 4, 11, 19, 96. 

These baskets were of various 
kinds, some being provided with 
locks, and others are termed 
" trussing baskets/' and were 
used for conveying large parcels 
of goods. 

Basons, for, 19. 

Bath, Bishop of, 90. 

Oliver King, who was translated 
from Exeter in November, 1495, 
and died in September, 1503. 
This prelate rebuilt the Abbey 
Church of Bath. 

Baynard's Castle, 20, 23, 25, 26, 



39, 54, 64, 69,71,73, 74,78, 

79, SO, 87, 88, 93. 
Baynard's Castle, keeper of the 

garden at, 98, 102. 
According to Stow, Baynard's 
Castle continued to be the pro- 
perty of the Barons Fitz Walter 
until the early part of the fif- 
teenth century, but he was not 
aware of the manner in which it 
was alienated from them. In the 7 
Hen. VI. 1428, he found, he says, 
that after a great fire there, it was 
rebuilt by Humphrey, Duke of 
Gloucester, on whose attainder in 
J446 it fell to the crown. It was 
soon afterwards granted to Ri- 
chard Duke of York, who lodged 
there in 1457 ? and in 1460 his 
son Edward, afterwards Edward 
IV., resided there when he de- 
posed Henry. To this it may be 
added, that Henry VI., in 1447, 
granted the house which belonged 
to the Duke of Gloucester, with 
all the appurtenances in the pa- 
rish of St. Andrew, within the 
ward of Baynard's Castle, to the 
provost and scholars of St. Ma- 
ry's College, Cambridge. Rot. 
Parl. v. 132 b . In 1455, " the 
grant made of the place at Ba- 
nardes Castell, late bildyd by 
oure uncle the Duke of Glouces- 
ter," was resumed into the king's 
hands. Ibid. 309. Certain com- 
missioners, who were appointed 
to administer the effects of the 
duke, were authorized in 1455 to 
take possession " of a place some- 
tyme callid the duks warderobe 
atte Baynardes Castell in Lon- 
don, otherwise called Waterton's- 
alley." Ibid. 339 b . In the 13th 
Edw. IV., the College of St. 
Mary's was specially protected 
in the enjoyment of the grant of 
the lands at Baynard's Castle. 
Ibid. vi. 91. It was the resi- 
dence of Cecily, Duchess of York, 
during the reign of her son Ed- 
ward IV., and after his decease, 
Richard III. dated the first in- 
strument on assuming the re- 
gal functions, from " a certain 
high chamber near the chapel in 
the house of Lady Cecily, Duchess 
York, near the river Thames, 
called Baynard's Castle in 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



177 



Thames-street, London." Fve- 
dera, xii. 189; and as, in 1480, 
certain articles of Edward's robes 
(p. 122, ante) were carried thi- 
ther from Greenwich, it may be 
inferred that he then visited his 
mother. In 1487, Stow says, that 
Henry repaired, or rather new 
built, the house in a beautiful 
manner, and mentions many oc- 
casions on which Henry resided 
there. These entries relate chiefly 
to repairs at Baynard's Castle and 
to the removal of furniture to and 
from it ; but we learn from them 
that the queen passed several 
days there, about the 19th No- 
vember, 1502 ; and she seems to 
have stopped there for a short 
time previously to going to the 
Tower in December following. 
Five shillings are stated to have 
been paid for making an arbour 
at Baynard's Castle in the 18th 
Hen. VII. Additional MS. 7099. 

Beale, mad, 104. 

This entry is so imperfect, that 
it can only be suggested that the 
sons of a deranged person of the 
name of Beale were charitably 
supported by the queen. 

Beasts, for painting, 36. 

It is possible these drawings of 
beasts were intended as designs 
for tapestry, G. 
See PAINTING. 

Bed, for working on a rich, 82. 
Ample evidence exists of the ex- 
traordinary richness and value 
of beds in the 13th, 14th, and 
15th centuries. Every kind of 
ornament, arms, flowers, devices, 
scriptural subjects, animals, &c., 
was embroidered on them, and 
they sometimes had particular 
names, and were not unfre- 
quently strictly entailed on the 
possessor's heirs. The bed here 
alluded to must, from its being 
described as " the rich bed," 
have been one of unusual splen- 
dour ; and three men and three 
women were employed on it from 
fourteen to fifty-two days each. 
" A bedde he had ryght well 

ydyght 

With ryche clothus of ryght 
gode aray." 

Legend of St. Ede of Wil- 
ton, stanza 296. 



Bed of Tourney, a, 39. See 
TOURNEY. 

Bedelle, Richard, 101, 102. 
The queen's auditor. 

Bedford, fee farm of the town of, 
109. 

Beds, page of the queen's, 4, 10. 

groom of the, 1 1 . 

wardrobe of the, 15. 

yeoman of the, 51, 81. 

Bedstead, for making a, 51. 

Bedmaker, a, 65. 

Beer, given to friars in charity, 
56, 57. 

Beer brewer, 56. 

Belknap, Mrs. Margaret, 13, 
38, 52, 99. 

One of the ladies in attendance 
on the queen's person. Query, 
if she was the Margaret Belknap, 
daughter of Sir Richard Knollys, 
and widow of Henry Belknap, 
Esq., who died in 1488, and by 
whom she had Sir Edward Belk- 
nap, a privy councillor to Henry 
VII. and Henry VIII. ? She was 
living in 1488, after which time 
nothing has been discovered about 
her. 

Bell, John, his child christened, 
28. 

The queen was, most probably, 

one of the sponsors. 
Bellows, a pair of, bought, 19. 

Belly, John, 45. 

Yeoman of the Queen's Stuff. 

Berkeley, 43, 44, 45, 46, bis, 49, 
50, 60, 62. 

The queen seems to have been at 
Berkeley from the 29th August 
to the 4th September, 1502. 

herons, 64, 66, 67. 

Query, Berkeley Harness, or De- 
mesnes ? 

Berkhampstead in Hertfordshire. 

the under keeper of, 30. 
Beverston, 49, 60. 

In the hundred of Berkeley? 
in the county of Gloucester. A 
small castle rebuilt by the Thomas 
Lord Berkeley who is mentioned 
by Froissart. See Leland's Itine- 
2 A 



178 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



rary, vol. vi. p. 68. " T. Lorde 
Berkeley was taken prisoner in 
France : hut after recovering his 
losses with French prisoners at 
the battle of Poyteres builded the 
castell of Beverston thoroughly." 
D. 

Birche, Sir Robert, priest, for 
singing 1 , 102. 

Birds brought, 54. 

Bits bought, 97. 

Bishop of the King's Chapel on 
St. Nicholas' Even, 76. 
" A gift to the Boy-Bishop for 
saying Vespers in the King's 
Chapel on St. Nicholas' eve. In 
the Wardrobe Account of the 28th 
Edw. I., published by the Society 
of Antiquaries, fo. 25, is a similar 
item : " 7 a die Decembris, cuidem 
episcopo puerorum dicenti vespe- 
ris de Sancto Nicholao coram 
Rege in capella sua apud Heton 
juxta Novum Castrum super Ty- 
nam, et quibusdam pueris venien- 
tibus et cantantibus cum episcopo 
predicto de elemosina ipsius Re- 
gis per manus Domini Henrici 
Elemosinar' participantis inter 
pueros predictos xls." The His- 
tory of the Boy-Bishop is too well 
known to require observation. G. 
In the extracts from the Privy 
Purse Expenses of Henry VIII. in 
1512, in the Additional MS., 7100, 
is this entry on the 5th December 
(St. Nicholas' Day), " To St. 
Nicholas, bishop, in reward, 
Gl. 13*. 4d." 

Bishops, new year's gifts of the, 
90, 91. 

Blades for knives, 96. 

Blake, William, 109. 

This person bought the wardship 
and marriage of John Carew, the 
son and heir of Sir John Carew, 
Knt., for which he paid 251. 

Blakemore, 45, 46, 66. 

In the hundred of Westbury, 
in the county of Gloucester. 

Boat-hire, 5, 6, 12, 27, 33, 34, 
68, 96, 98. 

The usual wages of each rower 
was 8d. a day, whilst the master 
of the queen's barge received 
double that sum : the hire of a 



boat from Greenwich to London 
was 4rf. We find that 2s. 4</. were 
paid for boat hire from Richmond 
to Greenwich ; Is. from Rich- 
mond to London ; 3</. from West- 
minster to London ; and that for 
rowing from Baynard's Castle to 
Westminster the rowers were 
paid 4d. each, whilst the master 
of the barge received a whole 
day's wages, viz. \Gd. The mas- 
ter of the other boats received 
always double what the rowers 
were paid. The price of a boat 
from Gravesend to the Tower and 
back, was, it seems, 3s. 4d. As 
the rowers were paid so much 
each for their services, the sums 
paid " in reward " for boats, pro- 
bably meant for the hire of them 
above and below London Bridge. 
" The hire of a barge with vj 
men and the master" for going 
therein to court on May-day, 1575, 
was ix s., " and for ij botes in com- 
ing up with the men ijs. viijd., 
and in reward amongst the barge- 
men xijrf.' " Gage's History of 
Hengrave, 

Bolok, John, 82. 
An embroiderer. 

Bolton, John, 45. 

One of the queen's servants. 

Bolts, for, 20. 

Boards, for, 74. 

Bone, Mrs, Margaret, 99. 

One of the queen's gentlewomen. 

Bonfires, for making, on the 
Eves of St. John the Baptist 
and St. Peter, 26. 
Strutt observes, " On the vigil 
of Saint John the Baptist, com- 
monly called Midsummer eve, it 
was usual in most country places, 
and also in towns and cities, for 
the inhabitants, both old and 
young, and of both sexes, to meet 
together, and make merry, by the 
side of a large fire, in the middle 
of the street, or in some open and 
convenient place, over which the 
young men frequently leaped, by 
way of frolic, and also exercised 
themselves with various sports 
and pastimes, more especially 
with running, wrestling, and 
dancing. These diversions they 
continued till midnight, and some- 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



179 



times till cock-crowing." " At 
London," says Stow, " in addi- 
tion to the bonfires on the eve 
of St. John, as well upon that 
of St. Peter and St. Paul, every 
man's door was shaded with green 
birch, long fennel, St. John's wort, 
orpin, white lilies, and the like, 
ornamented with garlands of beau- 
tiful flowers. The citizens had 
also lamps of glass, with oil burn- 
ing in them all night, and some 
of them hung out branches of 
iron, curiously wrought, contain- 
ing hundreds of lamps, lighted at 
once, which made a very splendid 
appearance." Stow's Survey : 
Sports and Pastimes, 316, 317. 
See Gage's History of Hengrave, 
p. 198, for further illustration of 
the pastime called the Midsum- 
mer Watch, when it was custo- 
mary to enter the houses of indi- 
viduals in the city to examine the 
state of their arms. 

Bonnets, for, 92, 98, 104. 

Bonnets, as is shewn by Strutt, 
were used as well by men 
as by women. They were com- 
monly made of cloth, and were 
sometimes ornamented with 
jewels, feathers, gold buttons, 
&c. Thus we find bonnets bought 
for the use of the queen and for 
the use of her nephew, Lord 
Henry Courtenay ; and in the 
Privy Purse Expenses of Henry 
VIII. bonnets are mentioned, as 
being bought for his majesty, 
p. 15. See also BONNETS, in 
the Index to the Wardrobe Ac- 
counts of Edward IV. In a cu- 
rious letter from Edward IV. 
when Earl of March, and his 
brother, the Earl of Rutland, to 
their father, after thanking his 
" noblesse and good fadurhood " 
for the green gowns he had sent 
them, they request him that they 
might have " summe/ywe bonetls 
sende un to us by the next seure 
messigere, for necessite so re- 
quireth." Ellis's Original Let- 
ters, First Series, 1. 10. 

night, a, 17. 

for fetching, 14. 

Bonvice, Jerome, 105. 

A Laurence Bonvice is mentioned 



in the Privy Purse Expenses 
of Henry F1I, as having received 
2068/. 4*. lid. on the 26th May, 
9 Hen. VII., " to employ for the 
king, which must be repayed : " 
and on the 1st June following, 
1340/. 11*. Irf. to buy wools for 
the king's use. 

Books bought, 98, 105. 

for making a chest to put 

books in, in the Queen's 
Council Chamber, 96. 

Bostall, 40. 

In the hundred of Ashenden, 
in the county of Bucks. An in- 
teresting account of an ancient 
house at Borstall will be found iii 
Kenuet's Parochial Antiquities, 

Botery, William, 9, 67. 

A mercer of London. 
Bourne, Mrs., 38, 51. 

One of the queen's gentlewomen. 

Bowl, a, 4. 

a washing, for the queen of 

Scots, 19. 

Bow, the queen's offering at, 22. 

Bradow, Beatrix, 100. 

Rocker to Lord Henry Courtenay. 
See ROCKER. 

Braggs, Emma, 100. 

Rocker to Lady Margaret Cour- 
tenay. 

Brampton, Richard, 95. 

Gentleman of the queen's pantry. 
By the description of " yeoman of 
the king's pantry," he and Tho- 
mas Fysh, serjeant of the pantry, 
were protected in the enjoyment 
of the office of keepers of the 
manor, park, gardens, and warreu 
of Shene ; and Brampton was 
also protected in the enjoyment of 
the office of keeper of the park of 
Rowndhagh, in Yorkshire, by the 
act of Resumption, 1 Hen. VII., 
1485. Hot. Part. vi. 381 a & b 

Brawderers. See Embroiderers. 
Bray, 106. See Cokeham. 
Bray, Lady, 10, 18, 21, 23, 28, 
bis, 52, 53, 54, 57, 67. 

Probably Katherine, daughter of 
Nicholas Hussey, esq., and widow 
of Sir Reginald Bray, E.G. and 
Knight Banneret. She made her 
2 A 2 



180 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



will on the 15th of December, 
1507, i n which she ordered her 
body to be buried in the College of 
Windsor, near her husband, and 
died before the 7th of February 
following, without issue. In the 
Privy Purse Expenses of Henry 
PH., in March, 1495, is an entry 
of II. 6s. 8d. being paid her for an 
image ; in the next year \L 2*. 
for stools and skrenes ; and in 
Sept. 1498 of 20s. for the queens' 
minstrels. 
Braybroke, James, 90. 

He is often mentioned in the Privy 
Purse Expenses of Henry VII. ; on 
one occasion, as having received 
9s. 8rf. for the painter, and on 
another 40s. for Perkin Warbeck ; 
and he appears to have been one 
of the king's servants. 
Breakfast, paid for a, 12. 

Nine-pence was the price of the 
breakfast of one of the queen's 
gentlewomen. 
Bread for, 79. 

Brent, Mrs. Elyn, 6, 12, 18, 23, 
25, 32, 34, 43, 53, 62, 99. 
One of the queen's gentlewomen. 
On the 12th April, 1499, 2/. 13s. 
4rf. were " delivered to Weston, 
for the king, for Mastresse Brent;" 
and in February following she 
received 1 2s. for a fork of silver, 
weighing three ounces. A Ro- 
bert Brent was gentleman usher 
of the queen's chamber, keeper 
of Sandwich Castle, and verger 
of that town, as well as pro- 
vost of the town of Middleton, 
in Kent, in the 1st Henry VII., 
(Rot. Part. vi. 378,) whose wife 
or daughter Mrs. Elyn Brent pro- 
bably was. 
Bretayn, Agnes, 27. 

Apparently the widow of a gold- 
smith. 

Brice, 78. 

Yeoman cook for the queen's 
mouth. 

Bricklayers, 80. 

Bridge, the reward of a barge or 
boat beneath the, scepe. See 
BARGE. 
Bridget, Lady, 29, 50. 

Lady Bridget Plantagenet, the 



queen's youngest sister, who was 
born about the year 1481, and 
having taken the veil, retired to 
the monastery of Dertford, where 
she died. See the INTRODUC- 
TORY REMARKS. 

Bright, John, 36, 49, 56, 58, 71, 
72, 74, 95. 

A page : his wages were eight- 
pence a day. 
Bristol, 42, 43, 44, 46. 

It does not positively appear, 
whether the queen visited Bristol 
in her progress, but it is evident 
that she was very near that city 
on the 22nd of August, when she 
offered at the chapel of St. Anne 
in the forest of Kingswood. 

, the fee-farm of the town 

and barton of, 101, 109. 
In the ?th and 8th of Edw. IV., 
1468, the sum of 102/. 15*. 6d. of 
the farm of the town of Bristol 
was settled for life on Elizabeth, 
the queen of Edward IV., to be 
received by equal portions in Mi- 
chaelmas and Easter terms (Rot. 
Parl. v. 625) ; and, by letters- 
patent, dated 26th of December, 
1487, Henry the Seventh granted 
to his queen the same amount 
" to be perceived and taken of his 
ferme of his towne of Bristowe, 
with the suburbes and the appur- 
tenances of the same." Rot. Parl. 
vi. 446, which agrees with finding 
that 5 1/. 7- 9rf. were paid in 
Easter term, 1502. In the act of 
settlement upon Queen Anne 
Boleyn, 31 March, 1530, 103/. 
15s. 6d. was assigned her from the 
Fee farm of Bristol, and 60/. out 
of the manor and hundred of Ber- 
tone jnxta Bristol. 

Broad heads, for a sheaf of, for 
shooting, 58. 

Brocas, Benet, 111. 

Receiver of the Duchess of Suf- 
folk's rents. 

Brown, John, 11, 15, 36, 39, 41, 
42, 49, 50, 58, 75, 93,94,95. 

Groom of the queen's beds. His 

wages were 1 Qd. a day. 
Browne, Mrs. Anne, 99. 

One of the queen's gentlewomen : 

her salary was 5/. per annum. 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



181 



Brushes, for, 45,75. 

Bryan, Henry, 5, 19, 25, 55, 68. 

A mercer of London. 

Brydges, Sir Giles, 47. 

Of Coberley, in Gloucestershire, 
father of John, first Lord Chandos, 
and ancestor of the dukes of Chan- 
dos. He was knighted for his 
valour at the battle of Blackheath, 
June 22, 1497 ; was sheriff of 
Gloucestershire 15 Hen. VII. ; 
and died in 1511. 

Brymesfeld, keeper of the park 
of, 38. 

In the county of Gloucester. This 
manor formerly constituted the 
barony of the Lords Giffard of 
Brimmesfield, and the house was 
rased by the army of Edward II. 
The manor was assigned to the 
queen for her iointure, 21st of 
February, ^ Hen. VII., 1492. 
Rot. Part. vi. 462 b . It had been 
held in jointure by Cecily, Du- 
chess of York, and was after- 
wards appropriated to the use of 
Katherineof Arragon. D. 

Buckles, laten, shoes with, 85, 
86. 

Buckles for the straps which 
confined the shoe to the leg. 

Buckingham, minstrel of the 
Duke of, 78. 

Edward Stafford, K.G., succeeded 
his father as third Duke of Buck- 
ingham in 1483, and was be- 
headed and attainted in 1521. He 
was the son of Katherine, daugh- 
ter of Richard Wydeville, first 
Earl Rivers, and was consequently 
first cousin of the queen. 

Buckram, for, 22, 44. 

Bucks brought, 30, 35, 38, 44, 

46, 47, bis, 48, 63. 
Bucks given in reward, 38, 39. 

These bucks were given, the one 
to the officers of the queen's 
stable, and the other to the king's 
harbingers at Monmouth, together 
with ten shillings for a feast. 

for conveying, 45, 48, 67, 

88. 

Bukks Shire, i. e. Buckingham- 
shire, 89. 

Buknam, Ann, 53. 

One of the queen's gentlewomen. 



Bullok, Richard, 88. 

A surgeon : his bill for attendance 
on the queen's nephew, Lord 
Henry Courtenay, amounting to 
10*., was paid by her majesty. 

Bulstrode, William, 6, 12, 30,36, 
56, 58, 59, 88, 91. 
It does not appear from these ac- 
counts what office Bulstrode held 
in the queen's household, but it 
was evidently a confidential one ; 
and, as his servant is spoken of, 
he must have been a person of 
some consideration. He was pro- 
bably the William Bulstrode, 
Esq., who was supervisor of the 
will of Thomas Ramsey of Hu- 
cham, in September, 1509. In the 
llth Hen. VIII., 1520, a Wil- 
liam Bulstrode was one of the 
gentleman ushers. Foedera, xii. 
712 ; and a Lady Bulstrode is 
thrice mentioned in the Privy 
Purse Expenses of Henry VIII. 
between 1529 and 1532. 

Burton, Edmond, 4, 7, 12, 35, 
49, 58, 71, 72. 

Yeoman of the queen's chamber : 
his wages were 1*. a day. 

Burying, expenses for burying 

a yeoman of the queen's 

chamber, 97. 
Burying men who were hanged, 

expenses of, paid by the 

queen, 14. 

To bury the dead is one of the 
" acts of mercy ;" and that duty 
appears to have been very fre- 
quently fulfilled by Henry VII., 
by his consort, the queen, and 
by their son, Henry VIII. " To 
the confraternities of the Miseri- 
cordia in Catholic countries be- 
long crowned heads and all the 
first nobility, who frequently give 
their personal attendance, in 
masks, at funerals, as well as 
contribute towards the charge of 
burying the dead." G. These 
accounts record an instance of 
two criminals being interred 
at the queen's expense. In the 
Privy Purse Expenses of Henry 
VIII. the payment of the bu- 
rial of a footman is said to 
have been done by way of alms, 
and many other persons were in- 



182 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



terred at his cost. In those of 
Henry VII. are entries for " the 
burying of a man that was slain 
in my Lady Grey's chamber 6s. 
8d. :" and " for Wodecoks burial 
21. Us. 2d." The following per- 
sons were also buried at Henry 
Vllth's charge : 27 February, 
1494, " For Sir William Stanley's 
burial at Syou 15/. 19*.:" 15 
November, 1503, " to my Lord 
Herbert, in lone by his bille for 
burying Sir Richard Pole, 401. :" 
" 8 December, 1499, for the bu- 
rial of the Earl of Warwick, by 
four bills 121. 8s. 2d. ob. :" " May, 
1500, for the burial of my Lord 
Edmund (the king's youngest 
son) over and besides the Abbot 
and Convent of Westmister, un- 
rewarded, 2421. 11*. 8d. :" A 16 
Hen. VII., for burying of Owen 
Tudor (third son of Owen Tudor 
by Queen Katherine,) a monk at 
Westminster, 3/. Is. 2d., which 
entry agrees with one in the 
churchwarden's accounts of St. 
Margaret's, Westminster. "1501, 
Item for the knell of Owen Tudor 
with the bell, 6d." Nichols* Il- 
lustrations of the Manners and Ex- 
penses of Ancient Times p. 4. 

" To Thomas Cornew, for burying 
of Master Hasset 21. 12s. Id., and 
" for burying young Percy at 
Stony Stratford, 20s." Additional 
MS. 7099. The expenses of the 
burial of Lord Edward Conrtenay, 
the queen's nephew, were only 
41. 18s. 4d. p. 103. Of those 
persons, all excepting Stanley and 
Hassett, were connected with the 
royal family ; but as Lord Stan- 
ley and the Earl of Warwick were 
criminals, both having been be- 
headed for treason, to bury them 
may have been considered as " an 
act of mercy." 

Buskins for the queen's use, 85, 
86. 

Buskins are presumed by Strutt 
to have resembled " the shoes of 
the carpenter's wife in Chaucer's 
Canterbury Tales, which the poet 
says ' were laced high upon her 
legs ;' and probably both of them 
resembled the high shoes still 
used in the country.'' Dresses 
and Habits, ii. 378. No earlier 
example of the use of the word 



has been found than in these Ac- 
counts ; but Strutt considers that 
the same article was meant by 
lu,usiaux in the Romance of the 
Rose, in the description of Pyg- 
malion adorning the female sta- 
tue he had made, who says he 
does not put " houseaux" on her, 
because, according to the printed 
copies, she was not born at Pa- 
ris : 

" N'est pas de housiaux estrinee 
Car ele u'est pas de Paris ne 
Trop par fust rude cauchemente 
A pucelle de tele jouvente." 
but, according to the copy in the 
Harltian MS. 4425, which Strutt 
follows (Ibid. p. 236), because she 
was so young that they would be 
too rough for her, 

" Car pas n'estoit de saison nee 
Ce fut trop rude chausement 
A pucelle de telle jouvent." 
See Houses in Roquefort's Glos~ 
saire de Langue Romaine. Bus- 
kins are said to have been the 
same article as is called sloppes in 
the Wardrobe Accounts of Edward 
IV. Strutt, Ibid. 345. The 
entry in which the word oc- 
curs proves that it was a kind of 
large shoe suited for travelling, as 
two pair were bought at the 
queen's going into Wales, which 
cost 4s. a pair. Buskins are not 
mentioned in the Privy Purse 
Expenses of Henry VIII. between 
1529 and 1532. Strutt has however 
cited an example from the Ward- 
robe Accounts of that monarch in 
1516 (Harleian MS. 2284), of the 
delivery of two yards of black 
velvet for making a pair : these 
he thinks were for masking, 
as he finds that crimson satin 
buskins were used for the same 
purpose, which were sometimes 
ornamented with aglets of gold. 
Ibid. p. 345 : but this conjecture 
is very doubtful, as there is evi- 
dence that Henry wore buskins 
and shoes of velvet, as well as 
of leather; for, by a warrant 
dated 28 June, 27 Hen. VIII., 
1535, the keeper of the great 
wardrobe was commanded to de- 
liver " To Henry Johnsone, our 
cordewaner, for twentie yardis of 
velvette of dyverse colours, alle 
of our greate warderobe. Item 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



for making of three paire of vel- 
vette buskynnes and nine and 
thirtie paire of velvetle skooys of 
sundry colours for oure use alle 
of oure greate warderobe. Item 
for syxe paire of English lether 
bootys, and syxe paire of Spanyshe 
lether buskynnes.'''' Archccologia, 
ix. 252. " A cote and a cloket, 
ij paire of hose, a doublet, a payre 
ofbuskyns, and spurres, a halt, ij 
cappes, and a payer of velvet 
shoes," were the articles of which 
Heiiry Bourchier informed his 
mother, the Countess of Bath, he 
stood in immediate need in June, 
1551. Gage's History and Anti- 
quities of Hengrave, p. 141. 

Butter, for, 14, 56. 

brought, 5. 

Bynfel, 3. 

Cabrok, (i. e. Colnbrook near 
Windsor) our Lady of, and to 
an Hermit there, 31. 
Cakes brought, 30, 38. 
Calverd, Edmond, 13, 26, 32, 
35, 36, 42, 44, 56, 71, 95. 
Page of the Queen's Chamber. 
His wages were 8d. per diem. 
Candles, for, 83. 
Candlesticks, for, 77. 
Canterbury, Archbishop of, 14, 
90. 

Henry Deane was translated from 
Salisbury to the See of Canter- 
bury, on the 26th of April, 1501, 
and is said to have died on the 
15th or J6th of February, 1502 
(query 1502-3) ; his successor 
was William Warham, who is 
stated to have been translated 
from London 29th November, 
1504, so that if these dates be 
correct, the See was vacant for 
two years. If, as is most proba- 
ble, Archbishop Deane died in 
February 1503, he was the per- 
son mentioned on each occasion 
in these accounts. 

Friars Observant at, 57. 

St. Thomas, St. An- 

drean, and St. Augustin, and 
our Lady of Undercroft, at, 3, 
83, 84. 



Capell, Sir William, Knt. 12. 
Ancestor of the Earls of Essex. 
Sir William was a merchant and 
Alderman of London, and was 
Mayor of that city in 1503 : his 
conduct whilst filling that office 
was made the ground, by Emp- 
son and Dudley, for extorting 
money from him ; and for refus- 
ing to pay it, he was committed 
to the Tower, where he remained 
until the King's death. In the ac- 
count of sums received by Emp- 
son for the King's service, in the 
Harleian MS. 1877, f- 47, in 1504, 
is this entry : " For W. Capell 
and Giles Capell his sonne, for 
their pardons 1000/. ; by recogni- 
zance, 900A, and 100. in money." 
Bacon says " he was condemned 
in the sum of 2,700., and com- 
pounded with the king for 1,6001.; 
and yet after, Empson would have 
cut another chop out of him if 
the king had not died on the in- 
stant." History of Henry VII, 
The money which he lent to the 
Queen seems to have been faith- 
fully returned : he died in 1515. 
See his will in Testamenta Fetusta, 
p. 531, and a notice of him in 
Collins' * Peerage, Ed. 1779, iv. 
348. 

Car, Close, the, 16, 46. 

for the repairs, &c. of the, 

34, 103. 

chare, the queen's, at 

Christmas, 104. 
See some remarks on the subject 
of Cars, Chairs, Litters, &c., at 
the end of the notes. 

Cards to the queen to play at, 84. 
See a note in the Privy Purse 
Expenses of Henry VIII. on 
CARDS, p. 306. 

Carew, Sir William, 109. 

John, his wardship and 

marriage, 109. 

Carlisle, Bishop of, 91. 

Roger Leyburn, Archdeacon of 
Durham. He died in November, 
1504. 

Carol, for setting a, 83. 

The price of setting an anthem 
was 20s. [see p. 2.] and of setting 
a carol on Christmas Day 13*. 4rf. 



184 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



Carp, a, brought, 2. 

Walton, in his Complete Angler, 
on the authority of Baker's Chro- 
nicle, where these lines occur 
Hops and turkies, carps and beer, 
Came into England all in a year, 
says, " there was a time, about a 
hundred or a few more years " 
before he wrote, "when there 
were no carps in England." But 
that this is erroneous appears 
from the Booke of St. Alban's, 
from this entry, and from the 
Privy Purse Expenses of Henry 
Fill., where several persons are 
mentioned as having brought the 
king presents of carps. Juliana 
Berners, however, states that 
" the carpe is a deyntous fysshe ; 
but there ben butfewe in Englande, 
and therfore I wryle the lasse of 
hym." 

Carpenters, to, 80. 

Carvenel, , 54. 

One of the queen's servants. Pro- 
bably the Piers Carvanell, who, 
by the title of the king's " wel- 
beloved and faithfull servaunt,ooii 
of oure gentilman hushers of oure 
chambre," was protected by the 
Act of Resumption, 1 Hen. VII., 
in the enjoyment of the grants 
made to him " of the tenements 
and houses unto us belorigyng 
within our pelece of Westmyn- 
ster, oon with the kepyng of the 
houses called Parydyse and Hell, 
within the Hall of Westmynster, 
and also the tenements whiche 
Jamys Pryse late had and occu- 
pied ; and also the keping of the 
Purgatory within the said Hall, 
whiche Nicholas Whytfeld late 
had and occupied ; with the hous 
under the Exchequer, called Le 
Puttans House, with the towre 
and hous called Grene Lates," 
&c.Rot. Part. VI. 372 b . By the 
same act, Piers Carvanell, the 
younger, was protected in the en- 
joyment of the baileshipp of Car- 
von in Cornwall. Ibid. 359 b . 

Carver, the queen's, 100. 

A note on the office of Carver will 
be found in the Journal of Bishop 
Beckington, pp 109,110. It ap- 
pears from the Northumberland 
Household Book, p. 302, that the 



Earl's second son acted as his 
carver, and his third son as his 
sewer; and it is evident that 
the office was one of much consi- 
deration in all great establish- 
ments. Chaucer says of the Squier 

" Curteis he was, lowly, and ser- 

visable 
And carf before his fader at the 

table." 

See Leland Collect., vol.vi. Todd' s 
I/lust, p. 229. Cant. Tales, v 
7831-2, 9646-7- 
Catesby, Mrs. Elizabeth, 99. 

One of the queen's gentlewomen. 
Query if she was Elizabeth, wife 
of George Catesby (who died circa 
1506), daughter of the notorious 
Empson. See Testamenta fatusia, 
p. 475 ; and Pedigrees of the 
Catesby family. 

Caversham, our lady of, 50. 

Cecily, Lady, 12. 

Cecily Viscountess Welles, the 
queen's sister, whom Hall says, 
was " not so fortunate as fair." 
She was asked in marriage by 
the King of Scotland, for his 
son, Prince James, which was 
frustrated by political circum- 
stances, and she became the wife 
of John Viscount Welles, by 
whom, who died in 1498, she had 
two daughters, Elizabeth and 
Ann, both of whom died young. 

She married secondly, 

Kyme, of Lincolnshire, but by 
him had no issue ; and dying in 
.... was buried at Quarera, in 
the Isle of Wight. Sandford's 
Genealogical History of the Kings 
of England, pp. 417, 418. A more 
particular account of her will be 
found in the INTRODUCTORY 
REMARKS. 

Chafer, for a, 19. 

Chain, for a gold, with knots, 61. 
In this and the next reign the 
taste for gold chains was carried 
to a great excess. They were 
very generally worn by persons of 
rank, and were often bestowed 
by the sovereign and other su- 
periors on their dependents, as 
a mark of favour, the extent 
of which was indicated by the 
weight of the present. By the 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



185 



Sumptuary Act of the 37 Edw. 
III. 1363, artificers, tradesmen, 
and yeomen, were forbidden to 
wear chains, or any other article 
of gold or silver. Rot. Part. ii. 
278, 281. Chains were frequently 
bequeathed in wills ; and, from 
the manner in which they are 
often described, for example, 
" A chain of gold of the old man. 
ner, with the name of God in 
each part," anno 1397 ; " a chain 
of gold with white enamel," anno 
1537 ; " a chain of gold with a 
lion of gold, set with diamonds," 
anno 1485 ; " a chain of gold, with 
water flowers, "anno 1490; &c. 
an idea may be formed of their 
workmanship and value. Sir 
Thomas Parr, father-in-law of 
Henry VIII., left by his will, 
dated in 1517, to his son William, 
his great chain of gold, worth 
140/., which had been given to 
him by that monarch, and which, 
allowing for the workmanship, 
must have weighed more than 
two pounds troy. See Testamenta 
Vetusta, article CHAINS, in the 
Index. In 1531, a chain of gold 
weighing 5J ounces cost 14/. 2*. 4rf. 
and in October, 1532, a chain 
made of gold, weighing 3 ounces, 
cost 11 . 14*. Privy Purse Ex- 
penses of Henry VIII. It was 
formerly the custom to wear the 
George of the Order of the Gar- 
ter, and the badges of other Orders, 
suspended to chains instead of 
ribbons ; and in old portraits, the 
knights of various Orders are re- 
presented with them in that man- 
ner. It would seem that this 
practice ceased about the com- 
mencement of the seventeenth 
century ; for, when James VII. 
of Scotland revived the Order of 
the Thistle in 1687, the following 
passage was introduced into the 
Statutes : " And we having 
considered that it was the ancient 
custom for the sovereign and 
knights brethren, on their daily 
apparel, to wear the jewel of the 
Order in a chain of gold or pre- 
cious stones, and that the use of 
ribbons has been brought in since 
the Most Noble Order of the 
Thistle was left off, and that 



chains are not now in use, we 
have, therefore, thought fit to 
appoint the jewel of the said Order 
to be worn with a purple blue 
ribbon, watered or tabied. " 

Chairs, coverings of, 27, 28. 

Chamberlain, the king's, 83. 

Sir Charles Somerset, K.G., Cap- 
tain of the king's guard, and 
afterwards Earl of Worcester, 
was the king's chamberlain in 
June, 1502. Fandera, xiii. 13. 

the queen's, 7. 

pursuivant, of the 

king's, 87. 
Chamlet, 20, 44. 
Chapel, bishop of, the king's, 76. 

See BISHOP. 

dean of, the king's, 31, 



64. 



90. 



ministers of the king's, 



money given to the mi- 
nister of, to drink at a tavern, 
with a buck, 23. 
A feast given them at the queen's 
expense. A similar entry occurs 
in the Privy Purse Expenses of 
Henry VII., and appears to have 
been a common practice. 

~, rewards given to the 

children of the, 54, 83. 
In the act of Resumption, 13 Edw. 
IV., Henry Abingdon was pro- 
tected in the enjoyment of 40 
marks per annum, which had been 
granted him in May, 5 Edward 
IV., " for the fyndyng instruction 
andgovernaunce of the children of 
the Chapell of oure Housholde." 
Rot. Parl. v. 594 ; vi. 86. In 
the act of Resumption, of the 22 
Edw. IV., Gilbert Banestre was 
protected in the enjoyment of the 
same salary for " their exhibition, 
instruction, and governaunce." 
Ibid. vi. 200. Among the Privy 
Purse expenses of Henry the 
Seventh, is an entry of 21. being 
paid " To the children of the 
Chapel for singing Gloria in Ex. 
celsis." Additional MS. 7099. 

Chaplain of the bishop of Mur- 
ray, a reward given to the, 67. 
2 n 



180 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



Chariot, to a poor man that 

drove the, 51. 

Charre, cotton russet for the 
queen's. 

See a Note at the end of the vo- 
lume, on Chairs and Chariots. 
Cheeses brought, 18, 33, 37, 44, 

87. 

These cheeses came from Lan- 
thony Priory, near Gloucester, 
and similar entries occur in the 
Privy Purse Expenses of Henry 
VIII., from 1529 to 1532. 

Chepstow, 43, 49, 51. 

The queen was at Chepstow on 
the 28th of August, 1502, on 
which day she seems to have cross- 
ed the river Severn near that 
place, and passed through Thorn- 
bury on her road to Berkeley. 

Cherries brought, 23, 30, 36. 

It is said that Henry VIII. intro- 
duced the Kentish cherries. Hol- 
land in his additions to Camden, 
states that Richard Harris, fruit- 
erer, was employed for this pur- 
pose, and that these cherries were 
planted in many parishes near 
Tenham. Archeeologia, vii., p. 1 1 9. 
Be this as it may, it is evident 
from these accounts that cherries 
were not uncommon in England 
many years before that monarch's 
accession. 

Chertsey, in Surrey, 17. 

Chest, for making a, to put books 
in, 96. 

Cheverons, cloth of gold with, as 
chair coverings, 28. 
Apparently ornaments placed on 
the coverings, in the form of the 
heraldic ordinary, called a cheve- 
ron. Proofs will be adduced, in a 
subsequent note, of the frequent 
use of heraldic terms in the de- 
scription of apparel and other 
articles. 

Cheyne, Mrs., 77. 

One of the queen's gentlewomen. 

Chickens brought, 5, 54, 78. 

Children, for the expense of, given 

to the queen, 11, 40, 63, 105. 

It appears that the queen adopted 

two children, pae belonging to a 



person called Maud Hamond, and 
the other to Thomas Hoden ; and 
that she paid the expenses of their 
nutriture, which, in one case 
amounted to IGs., and in the other 
to \l. 6s. 8d. per annum, a differ- 
ence which, perhaps, arose from 
their ages. Children were also 
given to her majesty's consort, and 
in the Privy Purse Expenses of 
Henry (he Seventh, is an entry of 
20d. being paid " to Matthew 
Johns for a child that was given 
the king on New Year's Day." 
Additional A/5., 7099. The prac- 
tice of giving children to the sove- 
reign, as a New Year's gift, seems 
to have been continued in the reign 
of their son, as on the 28th of 
December, 3rd Hen. VIII., 13*. 
4d. were paid " to a woman that 
gave the king two children." 
Additional MS., 7100. 

Child of Grace at Reading, 

making a shirt for, 50. 
Children of the Privy kitchen, 91. 

King's Chapel. 

See CHAPEL. 

Chollerton, Arnold, 25, 42, 71, 
72. 

Yeoman usher of the queen's 
chamber : his wages were Is. a 
day. 

Christenings, money given at, 
28, 29. 

The queen was probably a sponsor 
on each of these occasions. Simi- 
lar entries frequently occur in the 
Privy Purse Expenses of Henry 
VIII. Sir Thomas Boleyn's ac- 
count of the baptism of Henry, 
Duke of Alencjon, to whom Henry 
the Eighth was godfather in 1519, 
affords information as to the man- 
ner in which the money given 
by sponsors, at christenings, was 
distributed, as well as of the pre- 
sents usually made on those occa- 
sions. Sir Thomas says, " he pre- 
sented the queen, in Henry's 
name, with the salt, the cup, and 
layer of gold," and that the 100/. 
which the king had " sent to give 
in reward," was bestowed as fol- 
lows. " First, the norice, oon 
hundreth crownes ; to iiij rockers 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



187 



of the yong duke's chambre, ij 
hundreth crownes ; to iij gentle- 
women of the queen's privy cham- 
ber, called femmes de ret . . . . , a 
hundred and fifty crownes, and at 
the offryng, xx nobils." Ellis' 
Original Letters, First Series, i. 
160. 

Clarycords brought, 41. 

" The clarichord is described by 
Kircher, in his Musurgia Universa- 
lis, as a Virginal. Luscinius throws 
something like strips of cloth over 
the strings, to damp their sounds, 
and render the instrument more 
fit for the use of a tranquil con- 
vent. That the clarichords were 
similar to spinnets, or, in fact, to 
small harpsichords, appears from 
the description given of them by 
Luscinius (Musurgia, seu Praxis, 
Musicee, 1536, p. 9,) ' Omnia haec 
instrumenta habent plectra (sic 
enim ilia vocant,) chordas diversis 
in locis contrectantia,&c.' " Note 
by Mr. Ayrton to Ellis' s Original 
Letters, Second Series, i. 272. A 
clarichord is said by Chambers 
to have been " of the form of a 
spinette, but more ancient, and to 
have had forty-nine or fifty keys, 
and seventy springs." To<l(fs 
Johnson. Clarychords would seem 
to have been of considerable value, 
from 4/. being given in reward to 
the person, apparently a foreigner, 
who presented a pair to the queen, 
were it not that only ten shillings 
were paid for a pair in the same 
year by Henry the Seventh. 
Additional MS., 7099. Among 
the musical instruments which be- 
longed to Henry VIII., were two 
pair of claricordes ; and Skelton 
thus speaks of the instrument : 

*' The clarichord hath a tunely 

kynde, 
As the wyre is wrested high and 

low." 

An extensive list, with valuable 
notes, of musical instruments used 
in the commencement of the 17th 
century, will be found in the His. 
tory ofHengrave, pp. 23, 24, where 
virginals are often mentioned, but 
clarycords do not occur. " The 
Claricord is frequently represented 
on ancient bas reliefs in churches, 



both in France and in England, 
which differs materially from the 
Dulcimer." D. 

Clegge, Hamlet, 21, 62. 
One of the queen's servants. 

Clerk of the works at Richmond, 
18. 
Nicholas Grey. 

Cloaks, the queen's, 19, 54. 

Cloaks made of velvet and sarsnet, 
furred, &c. were also worn by 
men. Rot. Parl. ii. 2?9, 281 ; 
iv. 227. And in the 3rd, 4th, and 
22nd of Edw. IV., no person, under 
the degree of a lord, was allowed 
to wear a cloak or gown which 
was not of sufficient length, " as 
beyng upright, to cover his prevey 
membres and buttocks," upon pain 
of being fined 20s. Rot. Parl. v. 
505; vi.221. 

Close carre. See CAR. 

Closet, Clerk of the Queen's, 50. 

Master Harding. 
Cloth for, 25, 38, 74, 105. 

given to divers persons, 



74. 



Holland, 17. 

of gold, 28. 

rich, of tissue, 66. 



Clouds, embroidered, 83. 
On beds, &c. See BEDS. 

Cloughting, shoes for, 61. 

Strengthening them with clout 
or hob nails, and sometimes with 
a thin plate of iron called a clout. 
TodcFs Johnson. In Palsgrave's 
" Lesclarcissement de la langue 
Francoyse," ' cloute of a sho' is 
translated, " ung talon ; ung de- 
vant, ung debout." 

Clowts, for, 103. 

An iron plate to keep an axle-tree 
from wearing. Todays Johnson. 

Coals, for, 83. 

Coats, for, 20, 70, 76, 105. 

- of Kendal, for the fool, 24. 
Coberley, in Gloucestershire, 44, 

51. 

The very curious and ancient 
manor-house of Coberley, which 
is noticed by Leland, has been 
lately pulled down. D. 
'2 B 2 



188 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



Coffer, a, 32. 
Fraunces, 29. 

Apparently the carriage of a coffer 
belonging to a person called 
Francis. 

Cokthorp, to our Lady of, 3. 

Colbronde, George, 84. 

One of the queen's servants. 

Coldharbour, to the keeper of, 
91. 

See this word in the index to the 
Wardrobe Accounts of Edward IV. 

Colts, expense of breaking in 
and marking, 79. 

Cokeham, 106. 

In Berkshire. These lands and 
Bray formed part .of the appur- 
tenances of the manor of Strat- 
feld Mortimer, which was as- 
signed as part of the queen's 
jointure in 1495. Rot. Parl. vi. 
464. 

Cokkes, Richard, 56. 

A beer brewer of London. 
Conewey, John, a smith, 25. 
Confeccionary, the, 90. 
Confessor, the queen's, 32, 59. 

Dr. Underwood. See UNDER- 



for fetching him, 11. 

Conserva cherries, brought, 30. 
A conserve of cherries. 

Conyngsby, Humphrey, sergeant 
at law, 101. 

Ancestor of the Earl and Countess 
Coningsby. He was made Ser- 
geant at Law in 1496, became 
King's Sergeant in 1501, and in 
the 2nd Henry VIII. was appoint- 
ed a Judge of the King's Bench. 

Cook, for the Queen's mouth, 78. 
In the Act of Resumption, 28 
Henry VI., anno 1450, "John 
Gourney, Maister Coke for our 
mouthe," and " Thomas Cateby, 
Yoman Cooke for oure mouthe," 
are specially protected from its 
effects. Rot. Parl. v. 192, 195. 
And a "Thomas Cornyssh, Squier, 
Cooke for our mouthe," is pro- 
tected in his annuity of \Ql. by the 
Act of Resumption, 7th and 8th 
Edward IV. Ibid. p. 591. 



A " Yoman Cook for the 
mouth," and a Grome for the 
Mouth formed part of the house- 
hold of the Earl of Northumber- 
land, in 1512. The duty of each 
was " to attend hourly in the 
kitching at the haistry for roist- 
ing of meat at braikeiestis and 
meallis." Northumberland House- 
hold Book, ed. 1827, PP- 41, 325, 
326, 415. These offices still exist 
- in the royal household. 

Coope, John, 27, 103. 
A tailor of London. 

Coote, Henry, 92. 

A goldsmith of London. 
Coot's Place. See Cox's PI,ACE. 
Cordener, i. e. Cordwainer, the 

Queen's, 85. 
Cornbury, in Oxfordshire, 35. 

A lodge in the'forest? of Which- 

wood, near Woodstock. 

Cornish, , 83. 

William Cornish, jun. is men- 
tioned in Burney's History of 
Music, as a composer of this pe- 
riod. The extracts from the 
Privy Purse Expenses of Henry 
the Seventh, in the Additional MS. 
7099, present the following no- 
tices of him. To Cornish, of the 
King's Chapel, II. 6s. 8d. And 
again, on the 31st December, 
1502, 21. In the ?th Henry VII., 
" one Cornisshe" received " for a 
prophecy in reward 12s. ;" who 
was probably the same person. 

Corpus Christi Day, a gown 
fetched against, 33. 
On this feast a splendid procession 
always took place, and from the 
description of the gown cloth of 
gold furred with pawmpilion 
sent for by the queen, she was 
probably dressed in a sumptuous 
manner on the occasion. 

Cosham, in Wiltshire, 67. 
Cosham Park, the Keeper of, 
46. 

In Wiltshire. It formed part of 
the lands assigned to Elizabeth, 
queen of Edward IV. the queen's 
mother. Rot. Parl. v. 627. Le- 
land says " The mansion place at 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



189 



Cosham Park appertained to the 
earldom of Cornwall, and was 
wont to be in dowage to the 
queene of England." Itinerary, 
ii., p. 28. D. 

Cot's Place, 46, 49, 60. 

Coates, near Cirencester, in Glou- 
cestershire. The queen appears 
to have been there on the 12th of 
September. 

Cotton, russet, 104. 
Cotton, Dame Margaret, 25, 32, 
63, 75, 76, 97. 

This person had the care of the 
queen's nephews and niece, the 
children of her sister Katherine 
by Lord William Courtenay, and 
of her Majesty's protege", Edward 
Pallet. It is difficult, if not im- 
possible, to identify her, or either 
of the individuals mentioned as 
Anthony, Richard, and Sir Roger 
Cotton. A Thomas Cotton of Cun- 
nington, Esq., in his will proved 
in 1517, speaks of his son Richard; 
his uncle Richard, and his bro- 
thers Richard and Anthony Cotton, 
and his sister Margaret, a nun, 
some of whom were probably the 
persons here noticed. The name 
of " George Cotton" and " the 
three Cottons" are also men- 
tioned as having shot with Henry 
VIII. in the Privy Purse Ex- 
penses of that monarch, between 
1529 and 1532. A Sir Roger 
Cotton, knight, was protected in 
the enjoyment of the grant of the 
lands of William Barley, Esq., 
by statute II Hen. VII. Rot. 
Parl. vi. 507. Henry VIII. paid 
a visit to a Sir Robert Cotton in 
January, 1511 ; and as the king 
then offered to Our Lady of Wal- 
singham, his seat was perhaps 
near that chapel. Additional MS. 
7100. In the churchwardens' ac- 
counts of St. Margaret's, West- 
minster, in 1526, is an entry of 
6*. Gd. being received from a 
" Richard Cotton for his grave." 
Nichols' Illustrations of Ancient 
Times, p. 9. 

. Anthony, 30. 

Richard, 51. 

Sir Roger, sister of, 75. 



Counsel, queen's, the clerk of 

the, 101, 102. 
Chamber, keeper of 

the Queen's, 101. 

John Holand. 



the Queen's, 

for making a chest to put 
books in, in the, 96. 
Courser, a, brought, 89. 
Couper, Sir Thomas, parson of 

St. Bennetts, 25. 
Courtenay, Edmond, Lord, 32. 
Evidently a mistake for Edward. 
See p. 103. 

, Lord Edward, 20, 25, 

32, 62, 70, 76, ter. 100, 103, 
bis. 

- Lord Henry, 20, 25, 

62, 63, bis, 70, 75, 76, 77, bis, 
79, 88, 100, 104. 

Lady Katherine. See 

KATHERINE. 

Youngest child of King Edward 
IV., wife of Lord William Cour- 
tenay, and mother of the Lords 
Henry and Edward, and Lady 
Margaret Courtenay mentioned 
in these accounts. 

Lady Margaret, 25, 

63, ter, 76, 77, bis, 79, 100. 

Lord William, 6, 17. 



Lord WillianVCourtenay, son and 
heir of Edward, seventh Earl of 
Devon, of that illustrious house, 
married Katharine, youngest 
daughter of King Edward IV., 
and died 9th June, 1511, having 
had issue by her, Henry, who be- 
came eighth Earl of Devon ; Mar- 
garet, who died young, having 
been choked with a fish bone ; 
and, we learn for the first time, 
from these accounts, a son Ed- 
ward, who died on the 13th July, 
1502 [p. 32, 63,] and the expenses 
of whose funeral amounted to 41. 
18s. 4d. [p. 103.] It appears 
that their aunt, the queen, paid 
the expense of their diet and 
clothes ; that they were under the 
care of Dame Margaret Cotton, 
at a place belonging to Sir John 
Hosy, in Essex, near Havering 



190 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



at Bower ; that they were at- 
tended by two female servants 
and a groom ; and that she was 
allowed only 13s. 4d. a week for 
their and their servants' support. 

Courtenay, Victor, 32, 84. 
Page of the queen's chamber. 

Coynfayts, i.e. Comfits, brought, 
87. 

Cowle for water, a, 4. 

" A vessel in which water is car- 
ried on a pole between two per- 
sons." TodcTs Johnson. 

Crestener, Ralph, 102. 

Crewell, black, to purfulle roses, 
83. 

" Yarn twisted and wound on a 
knot or ball." Todd's Johnson. 
" Crule, or caddas, say set te" 
Palsgrave's Esclarcissement de la 
Langue Francoyse, 1530. "A coote 
and acappe of green clothe fringed 
with red crule and lyned with 
fryse," was part of the apparel or. 
dered to be delivered for the use 
of Sommers, Henry the Eighth's 
fool, in 1535. Crule, of various 
colours, also fringed his hoods, 
&c. Archceologia, ix. 249. The 
word frequently occurs in the list 
of furniture in the History of 
Hengrave : " black and yellow 
lace of crewell" p. 32 ; "fringed 
with crewell" p. 34. 

Crowham, Our Lady of, 3. 

Crowmer, William, 6, 57. 

Gentleman usher of the queen's 
chamber. A Nicholas and Wil- 
liam Crowmer were protected in 
the enjoyment of the offices of 
constable and porter of Pevensey 
Castle in Sussex, in the Act of 
Resumption, 1 Hen. VII. Rot. 
Part. vi. 374 b . It was perhaps 
the said Nicholas Crowmer who 
was a gentleman usher to Ed- 
ward IV. and attended his ma- 
jesty's funeral. Arch<elogia, i. 
353. 

a daughter of, 8, 57. 

A nun in the Minories, to whom 
2s. were presented by the queen 
" in almous." 

Bridget, 23. 

One of the queen's attendants, 



arid probably another daughter of 
the said William Crowmer. 

Crowmer, Mrs. Ann, 12, 99. 

One of the queen's gentlewomen, 
and probably the wifeor daughter 
ofWilliam Crowmer above-men- 
tioned. As she was paid her salary 
at Christmas, 1503, the entry in 
May, 1502, of 40s. in reward " at 
her departing from the court," 
cannot mean that she then per- 
manently quitted the queen's ser- 
vice. 

Croydon, 14. 

The princess, widow of Prince 
Arthur, appears to have been at 
the Archbishop of Canterbury's 
palace, at Croydon, in May, 1502. 

Crotchets, for, 92. 

Crane, a, brought, 51. 

Cupboard cloths, 77. 

Cloths used to cover cupboards, 
which were a kind of side board. 
In the list of furniture in Henry 
VIII. 's palaces, in the Harleian 
MS. 1419, "A large cupboard 
carpet of grene cloth of gold, with 
workes lyned with bockeram, con- 
teyning in lengthe three yards iij 
quarters," is mentioned; and the 
word " cupboard" thus occurs in 
it : " Item, Two cuppbordes, 
with ambries, ij tabells with tres- 
tels, one forme, and one stoole." 
" One table, and a cuppborde." 
" A cuppborde joyned to the 
wall, conteyning a holy water 
stock of marble," &c. See a note 
to the Privy Purse Expenses of 
Henry V11L, p. 313. Cupboard 
is thus mentioned in Palsgrave, 
Esclarcissement de la Langue Fran- 
coyse, 1530 : " Cupborde of plate, 
or to sette plate upon, buffet ;" 
" cupborde to putte meate in, 
drettoverj" and also, "Coupborde, 
unes almoires." " Two joyned 
coobards made fast to the wain- 
skote." History of Hengrave, p. 22. 
" A large coobard carpett fur the 
coobarde, of Turkeye work." 
Ibid. p. 26. In the Northumber- 
land Household Book, among the 
" linnen cloth" were, " For a 
cupboard cloth of ij breids for the 
sellar, iiij elnz viz. ij elnys longe 
and ij yerdes brode a pece. A 
single cupboard cloth for the said 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



191 



sellar, ij elnys longe and a yertle 
brode." Ed. 1827, P- 16 1" the 
list of persons to attend the earl 
" at his horde daily, and have no 
more but his revercion except 
brede and drynk," were, " a yo- 
man of the chambre to kepe the 
cupborde at the sellar. A yoman 
or a grome to awayte upon the 
cupborde as panteler. A yoman 
or a groome to awayte upon the 
cupborde as butler." Ibid. p. 362. 
It was one of Lord Fairfax's 
orders to his servants, in the mid- 
dle of the seventeenth century, 
" Let no man fill beere or wine 
but the citpborderd-keeper, who 
must make choice of his glasses or 
cups for the company, and not 
serve them hand over heade. He 
must also know which be for 
beere, and which for wine ; for it 
were a foul thing to mix them to- 
gether. Ibid. p. 424. 

Curtain, of beds, 65. 

rings, 65. 

Cushion, a, brought, 13. 

for various, 28. 

Cutlerd, Richard, 101. 

Dachet ferry, the keeper of, 62. 

to the ferryman at, 30. 

Damask, for, 19, 25, 65, 69. 

gold of, 8. 

Dancing, to a maid of Spain that 
danced before the queen, 89. 
Apparently one of the servants 
of Katherine of Arragon. Pay- 
ments of this kind were extreme- 
ly common. In the Privy Purse 
Expenses of Henry VII.. are en- 
tries of payments " to the woman 
that sung before the king and 
the queen in reward, 6s. 8d." 
" To a woman that singeth with 
a fiddle, 2s." " To the queen's 
fiddler II. 6*. 8d." " To little 
maiden the tumbler, 20*." Addi- 
tional MS. 7099. See Strutt's 
remarks on dancing, tumbling, 
&C., in his Sports and Pastimes. 

Darcy, Sir Thomas, 2. 

Probably Sir Thomas Darcy, KG. 
who was afterwards summoned to 
parliament as Lord Darcy of 
Chiche, and who was eminently 



distinguished in the reigns of 
Henry VII. and VIII. ; but in- 
curring the displeasure of the 
latter monarch, was beheaded and 
attainted in 1538. His wife is 
called in these accounts " Lady 
Nevill :" he is stated to have 
married to his first wife Dousa- 
bella, daughter and heir of Sir 
Richard Tempest, Knt., but whe- 
ther she was the widow of a Knight 
of the name of Nevill has not been 
ascertained. In the 17th Henry 
VII., Sir Thomas Darcy was sent 
on an embassy to Scotland, and 
the following entry occurs in the 
Privy Purse of that sovereign. 
" To Sir Thomas Darcy going in 
embasade to Scotland 20/." 

Darrell, Sir Edward, 89. 

Of Littlecotes in Wiltshire, after- 
wards vice-chamberlain to Queen 
Katherine of Arragon, and a per- 
son of some eminence in the reign 
of Henry VIII. He was married 
on the 25th April, 1512, as on 
that day Henry VIII. offered at 
his marriage, but whether the 
lady was his first wife Alice, 
daughter of Sir Richard Croft, 
Knt., or his second, the daughter 
of Lord Fitzwalter (Harl. MS. 
807,) is uncertain. 

Dartford, 49. 

Davy, Edward, 9. 

One of the queen's servants. 

Davys, Mrs., 64. 

Dean, Agnes, 46, 64, 100. 

The queen's laundress. Her wages 
were 31. 6*. 8d. per annum, and 
she was allowed 4d. per diem 
for food for her horse when at- 
tending her majesty on her jour- 
nies. 

Dean of the King's Chapel, 64. 

Dean, Little, and forest of Dean, 
in Gloucestershire, to a person 
who found iron there, 38. 
In the reign of Edward II., the 
tythe of a mine there was granted 
to the Bishop of Landaff; and 
in the 2nd of Edward III., that bi- 
shop claimed the tenth of all iron 
within the parish of Newland, as 
impropriator, which was allowed. 
Rot. Part, ii., p. 13, 85. 



192 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



Decouns, Richard, Mr., 1, 32, 
100, 101, 102, 107. 

The receiver of the revenues of 
the queen's lands, and the keeper 
of the expenses of her privy purse. 
He belonged also to the office of 
the Signet. 
Deconson, John, 12. 

Servant of the Prior of Hechyn. 

Denouse, Richard, 100. 
A minstrel. 

Denton, Mrs. Elizabeth, 88, 99. 
One of the ladies attached to the 
queen's person, with a salary of 
201. per annum. After her ma- 
jesty's death, on the 23rd June, 
1503, she was paid 202., probably 
her wages, " for the queen's 
debts." Privy Purse Expenses of 
Henry FIL 

William, 100. 

Carver to the queen. He was 
specially protected in the enjoy- 
ment of the carvership in the Act 
of Resumption, 1 Hen. VII. 
Rot. Parl. vi. 356. 

Denys, Mrs. Mary, 99. 

A lady attached to the queen's 
person. 

Hugh, 41. 

One of the queen's servants. 

Derby, Earl of, 21. 

Thomas, second Lord Stanley, 
and first Earl of Derby, K.G. 
He married Margaret, Countess 
of Richmond, mother of King 
Henry VII., and died in 1504. 

Dertford, Abbess of, 29. 

Lady Bridget Plantagenet, the 
queen's sister, took the veil in the 
abbey of Dertford. This notice 
of the abbess was of a payment 
to her of 3/. 6s. 8d. for the ex- 
penses of her illustrious charge. 

Desar. See DISAR. 

Devon, Earl of, 6, 86. 

Edward Courtenay, K.G., grand- 
son and heir of Hugh, brother of 
Edward third Courtenay Earl of 
Devon. He was created Earl of 
Devon 26th October, 1485, and 
died in 1509. The " Lord Wil- 
liam Courtenay," his son and 
heir, married Katherine Plan- 
tagenet, daughter of Edward IV., 



and the queen's younger sister 
See COURTENAY, and the IN- 
TRODUCTORY REMARKS. 

Devizes in Wiltshire, 6'7. 

the keeper of the park 

of, 47, 48. 

Dice, money for playing at, 52, 
bis. 

See a note in the Privy Purse Ex- 
penses of Henry PHI., p. 315. 

" Disguysing," the, 21, 78. 

Disguisings, so termed from the 
performers appearing disguised, 
and which are the origin of mas- 
querades, very nearly resembled 
mumming, and were the chief 
amusement at Christmas, and on 
other great occasions, in the 
houses of persons of rank from a 
very early period. Strutt states 
that " it frequently happened that 
the whole company appeared in 
borrowed characters, and full li- 
cense of speech being granted to 
every one, the discourses were 
not always kept within the 
bounds of decency ;" he adds 
that they were particularly splen- 
did in the reign of Henry VIII., 
and extended to the lower orders, 
but that many irregularities 
having arisen from persons going 
in the streets in masks, it was 
enacted by statute 3rd Henry 
VIII., cap. ix., that no person 
should appear abroad like mum- 
mers, covering their faces with 
visors, and in disguised apparel, 
under the pain of imprisonment 
for three months ; and a penalty 
of 20*. was exacted from all per- 
sons who kept visors in their 
houses for the purpose of mum- 
ming. Sports and Pastimes, 223, 
224. The entries in these Ac- 
counts relating to the subject are 
of payments for ornaments for 
the jackets of the performers, and 
of costs of the royal livery for 
the trumpeters, and for various 
minstrels, who assisted. An idea 
of the expense attending these 
amusements may be formed from 
the following entries among the 
Privy Purse Expenses of Henry 
VII. and VIII., one of which 
corroborates Strutt's statement:, 
that persons of the highest" rank 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



193 



condescended to take a part in 
them. " To Walter Alwyn in 
full payment for the Disguising 
made at Christmas, 14/. 13s. 4rf." 
" To Jaques Haute for the Dis- 
guising, 20/." At another time 
" for his bille for his Disguys- 
ings, }3l. 10s. 6d." " To my 
Lord Suffolk, my Lord Essex, my 
Lord William, and other, for 
the Disguysing, 401" " To Peche 
(qr. Patch the fool) for the Dis- 
guising in reward, 261. 14s." 
" To Lewis Adam that made dis- 
guisings, 1(M." On the 2nd Sep- 
tember, 1st Henry VIII. " For 
the Disguysings before the Am- 
bassadors of Flaundres, 601. 17s. 
lief." In the Privy Purse Ex- 
penses of the latter Monarch in 
1532, is a payment of \\l. 3s. for 
" masking gere when the King 
was at Calys," p. 270. 
Disar, to a, 53, 87. 

Evidently the more ancient Dis- 
sours or Sayers, and in French, 
Conteurs or Jestours, literally 
Tale-tellers, who recited either 
their own compositions or those 
of others, consisting of popular 
tales and romances. Gower, de- 
scribing a coronation of a Roman 
Emperor., says 
" When every ministrell had 

playde, 

And every dissour had sayde, 
Which was most pleasant in 
his ear." Strutt's Sports and 

Pastimes, p. 162, 163. 
The entry in p. 52 justifies the 
idea that, in 1503, a Disar or 
Desar was an actor as well as a 
reciter. " To a Disar, that played 
the Shepherd before the Queen, 
in reward 3s. 4d.," which it is pre- 
sumed meant the Shepherd in 
the Adoration. From the entry 
in p. 86, of money paid in reward 
" to William Tyler, Desar, late 
servant to the Earl of Oxford," 
and an entry in the Privy Purse 
Expenses of Henry the Seventh, 
in August 1498, of 6s. 8rf. be- 
ing given " to my Lord of Ox- 
ford's Jocular," it appears that a 
Disar and a Jocular, like Min- 
strels and Fools, then formed 
part of the establishment of per- 
sons of rank. 



Does, brought, 81, 83, 84, 86, 97. 

Dolbyn, Hugh, 9. 

One of the Royal Servants. 

Dorset, Receipt of the Queens' 
revenues in the County of, 
105. 

Doublets, for making, 34, 46, 
69, 93. 

Dover, Our Lady of, 3. 

Called " Our Lady in the Rock 
at Dover," in the " Privy Purse 
Expenses of Henry P77/.,'* p. 
273. Henry himself paid 4s. 8d. 
as his offering there on his land- 
ing at Dover from Calais on the 
14th November, 1532. 

Droon, a Minstrel that played 
on the, 2. 

A Drum. " To a droner that 
played on the drone, 10s. " 
Privy Purse Expenses of Henry 
VIII. " 1579. Paid to the soiers, 
the ansyant bearer, and to him 
that played upon the drone" 
Churchwardens' Accounts of St. 
Margaret's, Westminster, in Ni- 
chols's Illustrations of Ancient 
Times, p. 19. The' person who 
beat this instrument was also 
called a " drombeslade" and a 
" drounslate." Privy Purse Ex- 
penses of Henry VIII., 1532. p. 
316. 

Drops, for, 21. 

An ornament on jackets used by 
Mummers. 

Drying money, to footmen, for 
their, 81. 

The word drying thus occurs in the 
Churchwardens' Accounts of St. 
Mary Hill, London, in 1527, and 
is supposed by Dr. Pegge to mean 
cleaning. " For drying of the 
Pix for the sacrament against 
Ester, 4e?." Nichols's Illustra- 
tions of Ancient Times, p. 109. 
There is no difficulty in suppos- 
ing that the Queen's footmen 
received an allowance of money 
for cleaning, whilst her Majesty 
was on a progress. 

Duffyn, John, 5, 32, 37, 47, 58, 
66, 71, 72, 93, 94, 96. 
A groom of the Queen's chamber. 
His wages were lOd. a day. 
2 C 



194 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



Dung hill, for casting a, 79. 

Durham, Bishop of, his resi- 
dence in London, 61 
The Princess Katherine was there 
on the 6th November, 1502. 

Dyer, to a, for dyeing cloth, 81. 

Easthampstead, 52, 53, 57, 59, 
72. 

In Berkshire. The Queen ar- 
rived there on the llth October, 
1502, and remained some days. 

Eching hoops of the wheels of 
the car, for, 34. 
" To Eche" is to add to or in- 
crease. Thus Chaucer 
" Delitith nought in wo thy wo 

to seche 
As doen these folis that ther 

sorowes eche 

With sorowe, whan they han 
misavinture." 

Troilus and Creseide, i. 705. 
It was also used synonymously 
with to lengthen. " For echyng 
of a veil 10 elnes of lynnen cloth." 
Churchwardens' Accounts of St. 
Mary Hill, London, temp. Hen. 
VII., printed in Nichols's Illus- 
trations of Ancient Times, p. 98. 

Edward, Lord. 

Son of Lord William Courtenay, 
by Katherine the Queen's sister. 
See COURTENAY. 

Edward IV., King, servants of, 
23, 30, 67, 77. 

Edward, Prince, offering to, 3. 
Query, if to the shrine of Edward 
Prince of Wales, son of Henry 
the Sixth. 

Eggs, for, 14, 56. 

Eldreton, Thomas, 103. 

Apparently one of the Queen's 
servants. 

Elnestow, in Bedfordshire, Ab- 
bess of, 37, 47. 

Ely, Bishop of, 90. 

Richard Redman, who was trans- 
lated from Exeter in September, 
1501 , and died 26th August, 1505. 

Elyot, Richard, the Queen's At- 
torney, 100. 

According to Dugdale's Origines, 
he was made a Sergeant at Law 



in Michaelmas Term, 1505 ; but 
he is described with that title on 
the Rolls of Parliament two years 
before, namely, in the 19th Hen. 
VII., 1503, as a Commissioner 
for Wiltshire in the collection of 
the aid for Knighting the Prince. 
Eliot was made a Judge of the 
Common Pleas in April, 1514, 
and died in 1520. 

Elys, Roger, 37. 

One of the Queen's servants. 

Embroiderer, to the Queen's, 13, 
55, 82, 86. 

He was allowed Wd. a week for 
his board wages, and 21. a year 
for his house-rent. 

Empson, Richard, 101. 

The celebrated instrument of 
Henry the Seventh's extortions. 

Esterfeld, Mr., of Bristol, 43. 
John Esterfeld was one of the 
Commissioners in Bristol for col- 
lecting the subsidy, in the 12th 
Hen. VII., 1496. Rot. Parl. vi. 
518. He was sheriff of Bristol 
in 1482 and May, 1484. Evans's 
Annals of Bristol. A person of 
the same name represented Bris- 
tol in parliament in 1595 and 
1597, and was mayor of that city 
in 1594. 

Essex, receipt of the Queen's 
revenues in the county of, 
109. 

Eton, Our Lady of, 3. 
Estate, a Cloth of, 66. 

This entry minutely describes a 
" Cloth of Estate," or the canopy 
under which persons of high rank 
generally sat. 

Ewelm, 52, 59, 71. 

In Oxfordshire. The Queen was 
there on the 13th October, 1502. 
This manor belonged to Wil- 
liam de la Pole, Earl, Marquess, 
and Duke of Suffolk, in conse- 
quence of his marriage with Alice, 
daughter and heiress of Sir Tho- 
mas Chaucer, son of the Poet, 
and was forfeited by the Duke's 
attainder in 1450. It was, how- 
ever, restored to his grandson and 
heir, Edmond de la Pole (son and 
heir of John de la Pole, Duke of 
Suffolk, by Elizabeth, sister of 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



195 



King Edward the Fourth), in 
1495. 
Evvry, office of the, 80, 90. 

The office of the Royal House- 
hold in which the Ewers or hasons, 
&c., for washing the hands before 
and after meals were kept. A 
full account of this office, which 
still exists, and of the duty of the 
persons attached to it, will be 
found in the Liber Niger Domus 
Regis, Edw. IV., p. 83, printed 
by the Society of Antiquaries, in 
the " Collection of Ordinances 
and Regulations for the Govern- 
ment of the Royal Household," 
in 1790. Mr. Sharon Turner has 
misunderstood what was meant 
by " the Ewry," in his History 
of the reign of Richard the 
Third, as he speaks of Richard's 
having " a palace in London, 
called the Ewer." 

Exeter, Bishop of, 90. 

John Arundel, who was translated 
from Litchfield and Coventry, on 
the 29th June, 1502, and died 
15th March, 1504. 

Faggots, for, 80. 

Fairford, 45, 46, 47, 49, 60, 67. 
In Gloucestershire. It appears 
that the Queen was there in Sep- 
tember, 1502. 

Fairfax, Robert, 2. 

Robert Fairfax, upon which name 
Fuller observes " a pulchro ca- 
pillitio, from the fair hair, either 
bright in colour, or comely for the 
plenty thereof; their motto, in 
allusion to their name Fare, fac 
(say do) such the sympathy it 
seems between their tongues and 
hearts, was of the Yorkshire 
family of that name, was a Doctor 
in Music of Cambridge, and was 
incorporated of Oxford in the year 
1511." He was an eminent Eng- 
lish Composer during the reigns 
of Henry the Seventh and Henry 
the Eighth. Bishop Tanner says, 
he was of Bayford, in the County 
of Hertford, and that he died at 
St. Albans, which Hawkins ob- 
serves, " is very probable, for he 
was either organist or chanter of 
the Abbey church there, and lies 
buried therein." His arms were 



affixed over the place of his in- 
terment, but have long been hid 
by the seat of the Mayor of that 
town. His curious collection of 
MSS. by himself and other Com- 
posers, were in the possession of 
General Fairfax, upon whose de- 
mise they formed part of the 
Thoresby Collection. See Bliss's 
Wood's Fasti Oxonienses, i. 34. 

Fastern, 45, 48, 97. 

Park, 86. 

In Wiltshire. The park and 
pasture of Fastern were part of 
the Queen's jointure. Rot. Parl. 
vi. 462. 

Fawn, a, brought, 18. 

Feckenham, Receiver of the 
Lordship of, 110. 

Fee Farms, 109. 

" A fee farm rent is a rent charge 
issuing out of an estate in fee, of 
at least one-fourth of the value of 
the lands, at the time of its re- 
servation : for a grant of lands 
reserving so considerable a rent 
is, indeed, only letting lands to 
farm in fee-simple, instead of the 
usual methods for life or years." 
Blackstone's Commentaries, ii. 43. 

Feld, John, 28, 36, 40, 44, 59, 
60, 87. 

Groom of the Queen's Chamber. 
His wages were six-pence a day. 

Fent of gowns, 89. 

" Fente of a gowne fente." 
Palsgrave's Esclarci&sement de la 
langue Francoyse. This word is 
translated by cleft, rift, slit, &c., 
by Cotgrave. " Fente d'une che- 
mise" is the bosom, and as this 
entry relates to fur for the collar 
and fent of a gown, it probably 
meant the part over the bosom. 

Fines, money received for, 1 10, 

Firing, for, 45, 91. 

Fishe, Thomas, 30. 

Fitzherbert, Mrs. Elizabeth, 99. 
One of the Queen's gentlewomen. 
Perhaps this lady Avas sister of 
Sir Anthony Fitz Herbert, one 
of the Justices of the Common 
Pleas in the next reign, and el- 
dest daughter of Ralph Fitz Her- 
bert, of Norbury, by Elizabeth 
Marshal, his first wife. G. 
2 C 2 



196 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



Fitz Williams, John, 9. 

One of the Queen's servants. 

Flannel, for, 94. 

Fleming, Ann, called the great, 
a gown given to, 69. 
Perhaps the person who is thus 
mentioned in the Privy Purse 
Expenses of Henry the Seventh, 
in August, 1503 " To the long 
Fleming for a horse." Add. MS. 
7099. 

Flexley Abbey, 44, 46, 47. 

for offerings to 

the high altar at, 38. 
Flaxley, near Newnham, in Glou- 
cestershire. This place was visited 
in August, 1502, by the Queen 
during her progress into Wales. 

Flowers, for, 4. 

Fool, William, the Queen's, for 
his board, clothes, and ex- 
penses, whilst sick, 6, 24, 
26, bis, 61, bis. 
Two shillings a month were 
allowed for his board. 

the Lord Privy Seal's, 91. 

my Lord of York's, 2. 

The fool of Henry, Duke of 
York, afterwards King Henry 
the Eighth. These entries afford 
little information on the subject 
of Fools, which has been ably 
discussed by Mr. Douce, in his 
Illustrations of Shakespeare (See 
a note in the Privy Purse Expenses 
of Henry VIIL, p. 319) ; but they 
corroborate the fact that a fool 
always formed part of the esta- 
blishments of persons of distinc- 
tion. The following entries re- 
lative to "Fools," in the Privy 
Purse Expenses of Henry the 
Seventh, and in those of the 1st 
of Henry the Eighth, may be ac- 
ceptable. " To Thomas Blackall, 
the King's fool, 6s. 8</." " To 
Patch the fool in reward." " To 
the foolyshe Duke of Lancastre." 
" To the Lord Privy Seal's fool." 
" For a horse, saddle, and bridle, 
for Dego, the Spanish fool, 18*. 
6d." " For Duk the fool's rai- 
ment. " " To the King of 
France's fool in reward, 4.1. " 
" To the King of Castile's 
taal."-Md. MS. 7099, 7010. 



Of these fools the Lord Privy 
Seal's ^and ^ Patch' are j^the only 
ones noticed in the Queen's Privy 
Purse Expenses. It is not a little 
remarkable that Henry the Se- 
venth should have allowed a fool 
to be nick- named the " Duke 
of Lancaster,'''' as it was his 
greatest pride to elevate the house 
of Lancaster in the estimation of 
the world. In the Churchwar- 
dens' Accounts of St. Margaret's, 
Westminster, in 1485, is the fol- 
lowing entry : " Item at the bu- 
rying of Mr. John, the Queen's 
foole ;" and in the list of New 
Year's gifts in 1556, was " geven 
by the Quein's Maiestie the 
5th of December to a woman 
dwelling at Bury, for healing 
Jane the foole her eye, oon guilt 
salte with a cover," weighing 
lOoz. 3qr. ; and " to Mr. Ayer, 
for kepinge the saide Jane during 
the tyme of the healing of her eye 
two guilt salts with a cover, 18oz. 
di." Nichols's "Illustrations of 
Ancient Times, pp. 3, 27, 28. 

Footmen, the Queen's, for bon- 
nets, shirts, and other clothes 
for, 46, 69, 70, 75, 81, 93, 
96. 

- to the, for their drying 
money, 81. 

See DRYIKO. 
Fotheringhay, 79, 111. 
Fowler, William, 81. 
A Dyer of London. 
Fox, fur of, 17. 
Fustian, for, 16, 38, 73. 
Tranches, i. e. franchises, 106. 
Fraunceys, his expenses, 51. 
Frese, for, 45. 

Coarse Cloth. See a note in the 
" Privy Purse Expenses of Henry 



Friars Observants of Greenwich, 

56. 

-- of Canterbury, 57. 
Fringes for curtains, 65. 
Frontlets, for, 92. 
- gold, for fetching the 

Queen's, 68. 
A frontlet is described by Nares 



IiNDEX AND NOTES. 



197 



as a forehead -band, worn to make 
the forehead smooth. Among the 
effects of Henry the Eighth in 
the list in the Harleian MS., 
1419, are, " Frontellets of crim- 
son satten, embraudered with 
perles." Strutt's Horda, in. 80. 
And in the Regulations made by 
Margaret, Countess of Richmond, 
for the mourning of women of 
rank in 1492, Countesses and 
Duchesses were allowed " one 
barbe, one frontelett, and two or 
four kerchiefs." Strutt's Dresses 
and Habits, ii. 325. An entry of 
" four old frontletts of dyvers 
colours of velvet," occurs in the 
Churchwardens' Accounts of St. 
Mary Hill, London, in 1524, 
printed in Nichols's Illustrations 
of Ancient Times, p. 125. Though, 
as it seems, generally made of 
cloth, silk, or velvet, as in the 
entry in p. 92, where, together 
with bonnets, &c., they formed 
part of a silk-woman's bill, it is 
evident from p. 68, that they 
were also made of gold. By sta- 
tute 17 Edw. IV., the wives, and 
daughters unmarried, of persons 
having possessions of the yearly 
value of 101. and upwards, were 
permitted to " use and wear 
frontlettes of blak velvet, or of 
any other cloth of silk of the 
colour of blak." Rot. Parl., vi. 
189. Among the entries in the 
Privy Purse Expenses of Henry 
the Seventh, is a payment in 
1492, of 31. 13s. 4d. " To the 
Queen's grace for frontlets" and 
on another occasion, of exactly 
the same sum for "frontlets of 
gold." Add. MS. 7099. In the 
Privy Purse Expenses of the 
Princess, afterwards Queen, 
Mary, is " Payed for a frount- 
let loste in a wager to my Lady 
Margaret, iiij /*.," which must, 
from the price, have been of gold. 

Fruit, brought, 93. 

Frye, Sir John, a Priest who 
farmed, i. e. rented lands at 
Worthy Mortimer, to let 
again, 107. 

Fuller, Thomas, Mercer of Lon- 
don, 22, 27. 

Fur, of fox, 17. 



Furness, Abbot of, 110. 

Furring of gowns, 89. 

The use of Furs was confined to 
persons of rank by various legis- 
lative provisions. See Rolls of 
Parliament, ii. 278, 279, 281, 
282; iii. 63; v. 505; vi. 221; 
and Strutt's Dresses. 

Fustian, 105. 

Fyll, the King's Painter, 36. 

In the Privy Purse Expenses of 
Henry the Seventh, in April, 
1503, his name is thus men- 
tioned "To Thomas Stirr, for 
painting two Tabernacles, 61." 
" To Robert Fylle, for making 
of the same, 81." See PAINTING 
and REYNOLDS. 

Garter, for lace and buttons for 
the King's mantle, of the Or- 
der of the, 8. 

Gear, for a kirtle, and other, 
54. 

This word was used with the 
greatest latitude to indicate simi- 
lar articles to any one which might 
be the last spoken of. See a note 
in the Privy Purse Expenses of 
Henry VIII. in 1532, p. 323. 

Gentleman, William, 41, 56, 88. 

Page of the Queen's Chamber. 
Gentlewomen, for the convey- 
ance of the Queen's. See 
BARGE. 

Gentyll, James, Mercer of Lon- 
don, 24, 60. 

In the 19th Hen. VII., after the 
Queen's death, he was paid 301. 
for the Queen's debt by the King. 

Girdle, to a Monk that brought 
our Lady's, 78. 
Probably one of the numerous 
Relicks with which the monas- 
teries and abbies then abounded, 
and which might have been 
brought to the Queen for her to 
put on when in labour, as it was 
a common practice for women in 
that situation to wear blessed 
girdles. In a curious MS. of the 
fifteenth century, in the posses- 
sion of the Rev. James Dallaway, 
entitled " The Knowyng of Wo- 
man Kynde," one recipe in dif- 



198 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



ficult cases is, " to wryte the 
salme of Magnificath in a longe 
scrow and gyrdit abowte her, and 
sche shall be delyvert." Charms 
applied to particular parts of the 
body, under such circumstances, are 
perhaps not yet entirely obsolete. 
See Brand's Popular Antiquities. 

Girdle, materials for, 9, 51. 

harnesses for, 84. 

Numerous notices relative to the 
use of girdles occur on the Rolls 
of Parliament. See Rot. Part. vi. 
278, 279, 281, 282; iii. 296, 506, 
542, 593 ; and iv. 73. By statute 
3 Edw. IV., no person was per- 
mitted to wear a girdle harnessed 
with gold or silver in any part 
over gilt, who had not yearly 
possessions of the value of 401. 
but the wives of Squires of the 
Household, Yeomen of the Crown, 
and Squires and Gentlemen, and 
of Mayors, Aldermen, and Bai- 
liffs, might wear gilt girdles and 
kerchiefs, of the price of a plyte 
of 5s., v. 505. 

Glasbury, Henry, 91. 

wife of, 96. 

Gloucester, city of, 46. 

to an Anchoress at, 

67. 

to the Rood near, 67. 

Receipt of the Queen's 

revenues in the county of, 
108. 

Gold, flat and round, 55. 

The latter was eight-pence an 
ounce dearer than the former. 

of Venice, 8, 23,27. 

Damask, i.e., Damascus 

gold. 

Goldsmiths, to, 64, 92, 98. 

Goodman, Thomas, 101. 

Goodriche, Thomas, 10, 64. 
A Mercer of London. 

Goose, John, 2. 

The Duke of York's Fool, a name 
probably bestowed on him from 
his situation. 

Goshawks, brought, 43, 86. 

Keeper of the Queen's, 

94, 100. 

Gough, Margaret, 102. 

One of the Queen's servants. 



Gowns, for, 16, 17, 22, 25, 34, 
35, 40, 68, 69, 70, 105. 

various, described, 68, bis. 

Gowns, materials for making, 8. 

for mending, 7, 93. 

for furring and the cuffs 

of, 89. 

wedding, 49. 

for the carriage of the 

Queen's, 17. 

for fetching divers, 33, 



68. 

An elaborate account of the gowns 
worn at this and earlier periods, 
will be found in Strutt's Dresses 
and Habits. Henry the Seventh 
gave the Queen in 1500, 20/. 
" to buy gold of Venice for to 
make a gown." Add. MS. 7099. 

Grantham, to the brotherhood 
of Jesus Guild in, 51. 

Grace, the Rood of, in Kent, 3. 

Grapes, brought, 52. 

Grayling of tapetts for the 
sumpter horse, 14. 
Tapets, cut or rounded, like the 
partition line called in Heraldry 
engrailed. Instances occur in 
these accounts of the use of terms 
in the notices of dress, furniture, 
&c., which are now confined to 
Heraldry, as Chevrons, Pales, 
&c. Chaucer's Personnes Tale pre- 
sents several examples of the kind, 
" as to the first sinne, in super- 
fluitee of clothing, whiche that 
maketh it so dere to the harme of 
the peple not only the cost of the en- 
brouding, the disguising, endent- 
ing or barring, oundinff, paling, 
winding or bending.''' The word 
engrailed is thus used in the list 
of articles delivered for the coro- 
nation of Richard the Third 
" rede cloth engreyled with vj 
yerdes of white woolen cloth." 
Antiquarian Repertory. Ed. 1807- 
vol. i. p. 50. 

Gravesend, 96, 97. 

Grease, bought, 37. 

Greenway, William, wife of, 16. 

Greenwich, 5, 6, bis, 9, 10, 11, 
12, 13. 15, 16, 17,36,42,70, 
74, 87, 88, 92, 107. 
Her Majesty was at Greenwich 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



199 



on the 6th, 10th, 27th April; 
2nd, 3rd, 5th, 18th of May ; and 
on the 14th November, 1502. 

Greenwich, Friars Observants 
of, 55. 

Grey, Dame Katherine, 62. 

Apparently one of the queen's 
ladies. She probably was the 
Lady Grey in whose chamber a 
man was slain ; but it is difficult 
to identify her. See BURIALS. 

, Nicholas, 7, 18. 

Clerk of the Works at Richmond. 

Greyhounds, the expense of the 
Queen's, 33, 59, 88. 
The keeper of these dogs was 
allowed 2d. a day for their support. 

Grice, John, apothecary, 8, 27, 
48, 49, 

Griffiths, , 97. 

It seems that this person had 
been Yeoman of the Queen's 
Chamber ; and that he retired 
to the monastery of St. Mar- 
garet's, Westminster. The ex- 
penses of his entering there, as 
well as of his funeral, were de- 
frayed by the Queen ; whence it 
may be inferred that he was a 
favourite Servant. 

Grigg, Sir John, 80. 

Grooms and Pages of the Queen's 
Chamber, to, in reward, 78. 

Guard, to the King's, in reward, 
38. 

Guides, to, 32, 46, bis, 47, 97. 

Guildford, Lady Jane, 52, 99. 
One of the ladies attached to the 
Queen's person, and apparently 
Jane, the second wife of Sir 
Richard Guildford, K.G., and 
sister of Nicholas Lord Vaux. It 
is probable that it was this lady 
who accompanied the Princess 
Mary, sister of Henry the Eighth, 
to France, on her marriage with 
Louis the Twelfth, in 1514, as 
mistress of her maids of honour, 
whose unceremonious dismissal, 
together with all the bride's other 
English attendants, by Louis, the 
morning after his nuptials, is the 
subject of complaint from Mary 
to Henry and Cardinal Wolsey, 
in two letters printed in Ellis's 



Original Letters, First Series, i. 
115 119. The young queen 
calls her " my mother Guild- 
ford," and says, she has not yet 
seen " yn Fraunce eny lady or 
gentill woman, so necessary for 
me as sche ys, nor zet so mete to 
do the kynge my brother service 
as sche ys ;" and begs she may be 
immediately sent back to her 
" for," she adds, " I had as lefe 
lose the wynnynge I schalle have 
yn France, as to lose her counsell 
when I shall lacke yt." In a let- 
ter from the Earl of Worcester to 
Wolsey, also printed in Mr. Ellis's 
Letters, his Lordship acknow- 
ledges the Cardinal's letter, ac- 
quainting him with Henry's plea- 
sure " touching the retorneof my 
Lady Gildford :" he then explains 
Louis's reasons for dismissing his 
wife's English retinue, and states, 
that his Majesty persisted in re- 
fusing to allow them to return. 
Original Letters, Second Series, i. 
244. This lady, in the 6th Henry 
VIII., had a grant of an annuity 
of 20/. for her services to the 
king, to his father, his mother, 
and his sisters the Queens of 
France and Scotland. The Guild- 
ford family were peculiar favour- 
ites both of Henry the Seventh 
and Henry the Eighth. The 
husband, and Sir Henry the son, 
of the lady here noticed, were 
honoured with the Garter ; and 
the latter, at whose marriage on 
the 25th April, 1512, both Henry 
the Eighth and the Princess of 
Castile offered, was Comptroller 
of the Household, &c., to the lat- 
ter Monarch. In January, 1510, 
Sir Thomas Brandon, uncle of 
Charles Duke of Suffolk, be- 
queathed to " Lady Jane Gylford, 
widow," his place in South wark, 
with his lease, which he had of 
the Bishop of Winchester, toge- 
ther with all his purchased lands 
in Norfolk and Suffolk, for life, 
she to pay to his nephew William 
Sydney, 20 marks a year, with 
remainder to his nephew Charles 
(afterwards Duke of Suffolk), and 
his heirs. A notice will be found 
of the Guildford family in Col- 
lins's Baronetage, vol. v. p. 1. 



200 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



Gurden, Lady, 54. 

One of the Queen's gentlewomen. 

Hales, to the Holy Blood of, 3. 
" A pretended relick of the blood 
of OUT Saviour, which was brought 
from the Holy Land, and depo- 
sited in the Cistercian Monastery 
of Hayles in Gloucestershire, by 
Edmund Earl of Cornwall. See 
Collier's Ecclesiastical History, i. 
14 ; and Petri Benediciti Vita et 
Gest. Hen. II. &c. ii. 752." 
Northumberland Household Book, 
p. 438. 

Hales, Owen, fee farm of, 109. 

Hall, to the grooms and pages 
of the, for making bonfires, 26. 

Hallysworth, Dr., 96. 

A physician who was sent for to 
attend the Queen in her last 
illness. 

Ham, near Richmond in Surrey, 
79. 

Hamerton, John, 21, 42, 57. 

One of the Queen's servants, but 
the situation he held does not 
appear. 

George, 18, 35, 36, 

41,49, 58, 71,72,74, 91, 95. 

Groom porter. His wages were 
10<ft a day. 

William, 35, 37, 49, 



51, Ms, 58, 81,91, 92. 
Yeoman of the wardrobe of the 
Queen's beds. His wages were 
1*. a day. 

Hamond, Maud, 11, 63. 

A woman who had given her 
child to the Queen, at whose ex- 
pense it was nursed. See CHIL- 
DREN. 

Hamper, for a, 39. 

Hampton Court, 2, 6, 7, 12, 94, 

bis, 95. 
Hanged, for burying men who 

were, 14. 
See BURYING. 

Harbegiers, to the King's, 39. 
Harbingers. Persons whose duty 
it was to provide lodgings for the 
king, or persons connected with 
the Court, when on a journey. 



pro- 



In an unpublished letter, in the 
Hengrave collection, dated 26th 
July, 1560, addressed to the Coun- 
tess of Bath, from her steward, the 
following passage occurs. " Yo* 
L. shall understand that I have 
had mych adoo, in staying yo 1 
house to be takyn up by the Har- 
byngers for the French imbassa- 
dors which comyth for the confir- 
macon of the pease. They thre- 
tenyd to breke upe all the locks 
in the house, but I w^stood them 
as far as reason wolde, and was 
before the counsell byfore we were 
at stay, but 1 trust yo r house is 
now saff enough from ther ta- 
kyng." G. (See Herbegage.) 

Harcourt, Mrs., 62. 

It was intended that this person 
should have been the Queen's 
nurse in her last and fatal con- 
finement. 

Harding, Mr., 50. 

Clerk of the Queen's Closet 
bably a priest. 

Hardy, Sir John, 25. 

Harness, horse, for a, 17. 

Harnesses, for girdles, 84. 
See GIRDLES. 

Hart, a, brought, 51. 

Harveys, Richard, 110. 

Receiver of the Lordship 
Feckenham. 

Hawte, Jaques, 38, 80. 

One of the Queen's servants. 
The Privy Purse Expenses of 
Henry the Seventh state, that he 
was Under Keeper of Kenel- 
worth. 

Hawks, for meat for the, 94. 

Havering at Bower, 11, 32, 63, 
79. 

Hayward, John, 88. 
A skinner. 

Hed, Robert, 20. 

A taylor of London. 

Henchmen to the king, 90. 

Pages of Honour. They were 
sons of gentlemen, and in public 
processions walked by the side of 
the monarch's horse. See a note 
on this word in the Privy Purse 
Expenses of Henry F 111.. 1532, 
p. 327. 



of 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



201 



Henley upon Thames, 59, 71, 
72. 

Henley, John, 92. 
A sadler of London. 

Henry, King, offerings made to, 
3, 29. 

Henry the Sixth, who, from his 
exemplary piety, enjoyed the ho- 
nours of canonization. His shrine 
was at Eton. 

Hensted, John, 16. 
A tradesman. 

Heralds of Arms, gifts to, on 
New Year's Day, 90. 

Herauld, 47. 

Harrold, in Bedfordshire, about 
eight miles from Bedford. 

Herbegage, 74. 

Preparing lodgings and mak- 
ing other arrangements for the 
Queen's reception at the places 
through which she passed. See 
HAKBEGIEHS. 

Herbert, Sir Walter, 43, 51 ; his 
wife, 51. 

Apparently Sir Walter Herbert, 
younger son of William first Earl 
of Pembroke. He was retained 
to serve the king beyond the sea 
for one year with a large retinue 
in 1492 (Fcedera, xii. 480), and 
was specially protected in the 
office of Steward of the Lordships 
of Uske, Carlion, and Treyleck, 
" with the making of the crouner 
and officers to the said office" 
appertaining, by the Act of 
Resumption, 1 Hen. VII. Rot. 
Part. vi. 379. His wife was Anne, 
daughter of Henry Stafford, 2nd 
Duke of Buckingham, but he 
died s. P. 

Hercules, Friar, 8. 

In the Privy Purse Expenses of 
Henry the Seventh, in May, 1503, 
is an entry of 61. 13*. 4d. " to 
Friar Hercules, for a Psalter." 

Herman, John, Sergeant of the 

Queen's Car, 104. 
Hermit, to a, at Colnbrooke, 31. 
Heron, J^hn, 76. 
Hertley, John, 15, 16. 
A tradesman. 



Hichin, Prior of, 13. 
Higham, Stephen, 13. 
A tradesman. 

Hiltone, Elys, 17, 20, 54, bi. 
Groom of the robes. 

Hinges, for mending, 21. 

Hobart, James, the King's At- 
torney, 101. 

Attorney-general and privy coun- 
cillor to Henry the Seventh, and 
ancestor of the Earls of Bucking, 
hamshire : he died whilst attor- 
ney-general, in 1507. 

Holden, Thomas, 40, 51, 59, 
70. 

A yeoman of the queen's house- 
hold, but in what department 
does not appear. He was proba- 
bly the Thomas Holden, men- 
tioned in p. 40, as having given 
his child to the queen. 

Holand, John, 101, 106. 

Keeper of the Council Chamber. 

Holburn, Abbot of, 53. 

Horse-hire, for, 57, 59, 88, 97. 
The hire of a horse for carrying 
venison was, on one occasion, 4rf., 
and on another (>d. a day ; whilst 
the hire of one to convey a lady 
from Esthampstead to London, 
was 16d. 

Horse, the Sompter, 14. 

The sumpter horse was a horse 
that carried clothes or furniture ; 
a baggage horse. 

Horses, towards the purchase of, 
21, 53. 

Six shillings and eight-pence was 
the sum given in each instance to 
the same person, who was a groom 
of the queen's chamber. Henry 
VII. gave 101. " for six new 
chariot horses." Several entries 
in the Northumberland Household 
Booked. 1827, pp. 24, 55, 120, 
359, 360, and in the Collection of 
Regulations for the Royal House- 
hold, afford information as to the 
persons who were allowed horses 
in great establishments, and the 
names by which they were de- 
scribed as, the male horse, pal- 
freys, nags, &c. 

expenses of breaking 

2 D 



202 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



in, marking, driving, shoeing, 
baiting, &c., 79. 
Horsemeat, for, 46. 

Provender for horses. 
Hosen, for, 38, 61, 75, 76, 98. 

for making, 96. 

watchet, 96. 

Hooks, for, 92. 
Hoops, for eching, 34. 

-See ECHING. 

Hosy, Sir John, 77. 

This person was keeper of the 
King's Wards, with a salary of 
1001. a year, but he has not been 
otherwise identified. It may be 
inferred that he was the owner 
of the place near Havering at 
Bower, in Essex, where the young 
Lords Courtenay lived ; but Mo- 
rant, in his History of Essex, does 
not throw any light on the sub- 
ject. 

House burnt at Richmond, mo- 
ney given in remuneration of 
losses in consequence of, 18. 
House rent, for, 86. 

The queen's embroiderer was 
allowed 21. per annum for his 
house rent. 

Housell, for the Queen's, 1, 54, 

83. 

The Eucharist. To housel was to 
administer the holy communion. 
" The Cardinal song the masse, 
and after paxe, the King and the 
Quene descended, and before the 
high altar they were bothe houselcd 
with one hoste devided betweene 
them." Hall's Chronicle, Ed. 
1809, p. 376. When the Queen 
takes her chamber she must be 
" brought into the chapell or 
church there to bee houseled." 
Regulations of the Royal House- 
hold, temp. Henry VII , p. 125. 
" Toke the said John Glyn and 
hym ymprisoned, and in the castel 
in prison him kept by the space 
of v cures and more, so that noon 
of his freiides myght come where 
he was to releve hym with drynk, 
or'staunche his bloode, to th' en- 
tent that he should have bled to 
deth, except they suffered a Preste 



to come to shryve and howscll 
hym."-^//* of Parliament, Anno 
1472, vol. vi. 35. Thus too, 
Chaucer, 

" Man and wife 

Should shew ther parish priest 

ther life 

Ones a yere, as saith the boke 
Ere any wight his kouse.l toke." 

See other examples in Todd's 
Johnson, and in Nare's Glossary. 
It appears that the Queen com- 
municated thrice between March, 
1502, and March, 1503, namely, 
on Easter Day, on All Saints 
Day, and on Christmas Day, and 
that twenty-pence were paid on 
each occasion " for her housel.'' 
In the Privy Purse Expenses of 
Henry the Eighth, the situations 
of the persons in relation to whom 
the word is used induced the Edi- 
tor to imagine that it had another 
meaning than for the holy ele- 
ments. In April, 1530, the two 
Williams, who were little better 
than jesters or buffoons, and 
Philip's boy, were paid ten shil- 
lings each for their housel: on the 
26th of the same month Richard 
Ap Guilliams was paid 4s. 8d. for 
his howsel at Easter ; and on the 
28th, Thomas the King's Jester 
was paid 25s. " for his howsill and 
his livery coat." He is now how- 
ever convinced that he was 
mistaken, and that the persons 
above mentioned received those 
sums to reimburse them'for what 
they expended on communicating 
at Easter, they being wholly sup- 
ported at the King's expense. It 
is remarkable that though in 
1503 the Queen of England paid 
but 20(1. on such occasions, yet 
that only twenty-eight years 'af- 
terwards the King's minions 
should have been allowed ten 
shillings each, and that another 
of them should have been paid 
4s. 6d. for the purpose. In 1497, 
six shillings and eightpence were 
paid " for the King's offering at 
his Housillyng" 

Hove, Alexander, 66. 
A goldsmith. 

Hovvnslow, 53. 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



203 



Howard, Lord, 99. 

Thomas Lord Howard, son and 
heir apparent of Thomas Earl of 
Surrey. He married, in 1495, 
the Queen's sister, Anne, daugh- 
ter of King Edward the Fourth, 
by whom he had two children, 
who died young. Lord Howard 
signalized himself at the battle of 
Floddea, and succeeded his father 
as Duke of Norfolk, in 1524. He 
was allowed 12(M. per annum by 
the Queen for the support of her 
sister. 

Howell, Thomas ap, 6. 

, William ap, 30. 

Humberston, Thomas, 66, 96. 

A hosier. 
Hungary, Ambassadors of, 11, 

39. 

A treaty was entered into in May, 
1502, with Ladislaus, King of 
Hungary, that Henry should assist 
him against the Turks. F&dera, 
xiii. p. 5. But nothing occurs in 
that work to justify the idea that 
he then sent ambassadors to this 
country. The Emperor Maximi- 
lian, who also called himself King 
of Hungary, in April, 1502, ap- 
pointed Cornelius de Burghes the 
Lord of Berselles, Knight of 
the Golden Fleece, and Indoctus 
Prant, Knight, his ambassadors 
to Henry, who, doubtless, are the 
persons mentioned as having been 
at Richmond in the May fol- 
lowing. 

Hungerford, Lady, 47. 

Hunt, Thomas, 90. 

Of the office of the confectionary. 

Hunters, for going after, 94. 

Hynde, Thomas, 60. 
A mercer of London. 

Hynsted, John, 56, 103, bis. 
A wax chandler of London. 

Ink, for, 102. 

Johnes, Mrs. Eleanor, 5, bis, 12, 
13, 15, 18, 21,99, 110. 

One of the Queen's gentlewomen. 
Though repeatedly mentioned as 
being in attendance on her 



Majesty between March and 
June, 1502, she is not again 
noticed until September, 1503, 
when she received her salary 
of 61. 13s. 4d. She was probably 
the wife or daughter of the Robert 
Johnes, the King's " welbeloved 
servaunt, and oon of the gromes 
of cure chambre," who was spe- 
cially protected in the enjoyment 
of the offices of Constable and 
Parker of Lantrishen and the 
Isle of Bar, in South Wales, in 
the Act of Resumption, 1 Hen. 
VII. ; and also in the enjoyment 
of all offices and fees which had 
been granted to him, by the Act 
of Resumption, 11 Hen. VII. 
Rot. Part. vi. 351, 471. 

Johnson, John, a surgeon, 14. 
Robert, 40. 

The queen's taylor. 
Ipswich, our lady of, 3. 
Iron, for finding, 38. 

See DEAN. 
Ivory, for a box of, 27. 

a chest of, brought, 15. 

Jagging of tapetts, 14. 

To jag is to cut into indentures, 
now called Vandykes : " j hode 
of blakke felwet with a typpet 
halfe damask and halfe felwet 
V J a ffffyd:" " j hode of depe 
grene felwet jakgyd, upon the 
rolle : " " j rydyng hode of rede 
felwet with iiij jaggys : " a tippet 
" with j jagge" > " a jagged 
hode," occur in the inventory of 
the effects of Sir John Fastolfe. 
Archaelogia, xxi. 254, 259. 

Jackets, for, 93. 

for garnishing, for the 

disguising, 21. 

-See DISGUISING. 

Jentille, James, 24. 

See GENTLE. 

Jewels, attendance on the queen's, 
29, 40, 44, 59, 60, 87. 

Wages of the two grooms of the 
queen's chamber, whose duty it 
was to take care of her majesty's 
jewels. 

Jewelry, for, 64, 66. 

Henry gave the queen, on one 
2 D 2 



204 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



occasion, 3U. 10s. for jewels; and 
after her death, an entry occurs in 
the Privy Purse Expenses of her 
husband " To Steven Jenyns of 
London, for pledging certain of 
the queen's jewels, 10(W." 26 
May, 1503. Part of the jewels 
mentioned in these accounts were 
bought for the queen against the 
marriage of Prince Arthur. 

Journies, costs of, 6, 32, 39, 40. 
Jubilee, letter of pardon of the, 
12. 

Every twenty-fifth year was a 
year of jubilee, and the Holy 
See then granted extraordinary 
indulgences : of these " the let- 
ter of pardon " was the certi- 
ficate, the price of which was 
only twelve-pence. In the Privy 
Purse Expenses of Henry the 
Seventh, 23rd September, 1501, 
is this entry, " To the official of 
Sarum that come with the money 
of the jubilee." The year 1501 
was the year of jubilee, and it is 
singular that the Princess Mary's 
letter of pardon should not have 
been paid for until May, 1502. 

Justice, Richard, 7, 15, 46, 63, 
68. 
Page of the robes. 

Katherine, lady, 17, 32, 33, 89, 
99, 100, 103. 

All these entries relate to Kathe- 
rine, youngest child of King Ed- 
ward the Fourth and wife of Lord 
William Courtenay, son and heir 
of the Earl of Devon. An ac- 
count of this personage will be 
found in the INTRODUCTORY 
REMARKS. Henry the Seventh 
sent her, by her servant, in Sep- 
tember, 1502, 10/. 

Kemys, Henry, 101. 

Probably a relation of the wife of 
Thomas Lucas the Solicitor-Ge- 
neral. G. 

Kendal, for, 24. 

A kind of coarse cloth. 

Kersey, for, 24. 

Key, for making a, 68. 

Kidlington, i. e., Kiddington, in 
Oxfordshire, 34. 



King, the, 8, 14, bis, 67. 

King's daughter, the, 94. 

The youngest child of Henry the 
Seventh and Elizabeth of York, 
in giving birth to whom her 
mother lost her life. The infant 
was born on the 2nd of February, 
1502-3, and died soon afterwards. 
Sandford conjectures that she was 
named after Katherine of Ar- 
ragon, her sister-in-law, and that 
that princess was her god-mother ; 
but it is more probable that 
she was named after her aunt, 
Katherine Courtenay. The entry 
relating to this child is for four 
yards of flannel for her use. 

King's father, the obit of the, 
55. 

Edmond of Hadham, Earl of 
Richmond, father of Henry the 
Seventh, died on the 3rd of No- 
vember, 1456, Dugdale's Baro- 
nage, ii. 237 which date agrees 
with the statement of 5*. being 
paid on the third of November, 
1502, for the queen's offering at 
the celebration of the obit of that 
prince. 

King's Mother, the, 52, 91. 

Margaret, Countess of Richmond, 
who married to her second hus- 
band, Sir Henry Stafford, younger 
son of Humphrey, Duke of Buck- 
ingham ; and to her third, Tho- 
mas, first Earl of Derby. She 
died 29th of June, 1509. 

King's Place at Westminster, 

the keeper of, 2. 
Kirtles, for, 38, 40. 

for hemming and making 

or mending, 7, 22, 23, 35, 54. 
93. 

An explanation of kirtles will be 
found in a note to Bishop Beck- 
ington's Journal. 8vo. 1828. 

Kitchin, to the officers of the, 2. 

the children of the privy, 

91. 
Knives, carving, 96. 

small, enamelled, 96. 

Knoyell, William, 107. 

A receiver of part of the queen's 

revenues. 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



205 



Kydwelly, Sir Morgan, 87, 101. 
This person, who was appointed 
Attorney-general by Richard the 
Third, was the first to desert the 
sovereign to whom he owed his 
promotion, and became one of the 
earliest and most zealous of Henry 
the Seventh's supporters : to 
his treachery, Mr. Sharon Tur- 
ner and other historians mainly 
attribute Richard's subsequent 
disasters. It is remarkable that 
he neither retained his situation 
of Attorney-general after Henry's 
accession nor was promoted to 
any judicial office. To what ex- 
tent he enjoyed that monarch's 
favour is uncertain, but these ac- 
qpunts prove that he was knighted 
and received a small annual fee 
in consequence of holding some 
official appointment. In the 1 
Hen. VII. it is said that Richard 
had made him a referee in a cer- 
tain suit on behalf of Thomas 
Gyldyn, and that having obtained 
a knowledge of the claimant's 
title, " within a little tyme after 
that tyme, the said Morgan mar- 
ryied one Avys which pretendit to 
be nigh of blode to the foresaid 
Thomas Gyldyn" took possession 
of the lands in dispute, and " re- 
tained the same . agenst all con- 
science and equyte, full ungodely, 
the said Morgan beyng of greate 
myght and favored in the said 
shire of Dorset beyng attorney 
to the late pretended Kyng 
Richard the Third." Rot. Part. 
vi. 321. In 1503, Sir Morgan 
Kydwelly was one of the Com- 
missioners for levying an aid in 
the County of Dorset. Ibid. 535. 

Kynifare, fee farm of, 109. 
Kanefare, in Staffordshire. 

Labourers, to, 80. 

Laces, for, 51, 75. 

Ladies and gentlewomen, the 
queen's, clothes of, 40. 
This entry proves that the ladies 
in attendance on the queen were 
clothed at her expense. It is re- 
markable, as indicative of the 
want of money, that this and 



many other bills were not wholly 
discharged at one payment, but 
that part only, in this instance 
not half, should be paid at one 
time. 

Ladies and gentlewomen of the 
court, for conveying, 15, 73, 
et scupe. 
Vide BARGE. 

Lady of grace at St. Paul's, 81. 

Lady's, our, girdle brought, 78. 
See GIRDLE. 

Lakyn, Mrs., 57. 

Probably one of the queen's gentle- 
women. 

Lambeth, 32. 

Lampreys baked, brought, 89. 
Lampreys were a favourite dish, 
and one of our early monarchs is 
said to have died from having 
supped too plentifully off them. 
In the Hengrave Household Ac- 
counts is this entry, "for pre- 
senting a lamprey pye vj d." 

Langley, 37, 38, 40, 44, 45, 48, 
49, 51, 56, 57, 59, 60, 63, 67, 
74. 

Langley, in the hundred of Chad- 
lington, in Oxfordshire. Her 
majesty was there on the 5th and 
6th of August, 1 6th and 20th of 
September, 2nd October, and 15th 
November, 1502. 

Lands and revenues, receipts of 

the queen's, 107. 
Langton, Henry, 77. 

An old servant of King Edward 

the Fourth. 

Lanston, Robert, 94. 

One of the queen's servants. 
Lanthony, Prior of, 18, 33, 37, 
44, 89. 

cheese, a, brought, 

14. 

Larks bought, 78. 
Lathes, Doctor, 13. 
Probably a physician. 

Latoii, buckles and rings of, 65, 
85, 86. 

A great deal has been said by 
various writers on the metal called 



206 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



Laton See a note to the Privy 
Purse Expenses of Henry VIII. in 
1532, p. 333, to which it is only ne- 
cessary to add, that Palsgrave, in 
his Esclarcissement de fa Langue 
Francoyse, translates it by the 
word Laton. Laiton is still com- 
mon in France, and is defined 
to be " cuivre jaune mele avec 
la mine de zinc ou calamine, a 
1'eclat d'or." That it was of a 
pale yellow colour is proved by 
Chaucer's saying, 
" Phoebus waxe old and hewed 

like I at on 

That in his hote declination 
Shone as the burned gold with 

stremes bright : 
But now in Capricorne adoun 

he light 

Wher as he shone ful pale, I 
dare well sain." 
Frankeleine'sTale^ v. 11557. 

Launderer, the Queen's, 46, 64, 
100. 

Agnes Dean. Her wages were 
3/. 6s. Bd. per annum ; and when 
travelling, she was allowed 4d. 
per diem for her horse meat. 

Lawn, for a shirt, 50. 

Kerchiefs of lawne, nyfels, um- 
ple, or eny other manere of ker- 
chiefs, exceeding the price of 1 Os. 
per plight, were forbidden to be 
sold iii England on penalty of 
paying 13s. 4d. per plight by 
statute 3 and 4 Edw. IV. 1463- 
4. Rot. Part. v. 505. Several 
pieces of lawn of the value of 3s. 
and 3s. 4d. the ell are mentioned 
in the inventory of the effects of 
Henry the Fifth in 1423 Ibid. 
iv. 239. A lawn shirt of Arthur, 
Prince of Wales, worked in blue 
silk, is in possession of John 
Gage, Esq., F.R.S., Dir. S. A., 
to whom it was given by Mary, 
Countess St. Martin de Tront, 
the representative of the Bostock 
family, a member of which was of 
the Prince of Wales' s household. 

Lead, for, 25. 

Lee, Mrs. Elizabeth, 5, 11, 14, 
30, 43, 52, 99. 

One of the Queen's gentle- 
women. 



Levesey, Edmond, 35, 36, 41, 
42, 95. 

Yeoman of the Queen's household. 
His wages were Is. a-day. 

Lewes, Sir Richard, knight, 61. 
Apparently a goldsmith. 

William, 80. 

Gentleman of the Ewry. 

Lime, for, 80. 

Linchelade, to our lady of, 37. 

Lines for making two for the 

Queen's car, 104. 
Linnen cloth, for, 62, 65, 70, 

78, 80. 

Liquoring, for barehides, 37. 
See BAREHIDES. 

Litter, for making a, 69. 

Pins, for, 45. 

for coverings of the 

Queen's, 28, 103. 
for the expenses of the 

Queen's, 45. 
See CAR. 

Locks bought, 11, 20, 68, 71, 

80. 
Lock, Mrs., 14, 39, 92. 

A silkwoman. 

Lodgings, for preparing, 35, 41, 
42, 49, 56, 57, 70,71,72,93, 
95, 98. 

Expenses incurred in preparing 
for the queen's reception at the 
various places to which she 
went. 

London, Mayor of, 23, 48. 

In the 17 Hen. VII. 1501-2, Sir 

John Shaa Goldsmith, whose 
name again occurs in these Ac- 
counts, was Mayor of London : 
his successor was Sir Bartho- 
lomew Rede, son of Robert Rede, 
of Crowhurst, in Norfolk. 

Long, Sir John, 51. 
Lorimer, to a, for bits, 97. 
Loryden, Marques, a minstrel, 

100. 

Loveday, Ann, 37. 
A nun at Elnestow. 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



207 



Lovel, Lady, 13, 15. 

Perhaps the wife of Sir Thomas 
Lovel, mentioned in the next 
note ; but her maiden name has 
not been ascertained. She pre- 
sented the Queen with a box of 
ivory, having the passion of our 
Lord engraved thereon, in May 
1502, and seems to have left 
Richmond, where the Queen was 
staying, on the 24th of that 
month. 

Sir Thomas, 110. 

Apparently the " Thomas Lovell, 
of Beecheham Wells, Gentle- 
man," who was attainted of high 
treason, 1 Ric. III. Rot. Part. 
vi. 246, but which was reversed 
in the 1 Hen. VII. Ibid. p. 273, 
and, it is presumed, was the 
person who was protected in the 
enjoyment of various grants in 
the act of assumption of the 
1 Hen. VII. Rot. Purl. vi. 
284, 286, 345 ; by the act re- 
storing John Lord Zouche in 
the 11 Hen. VII Ibid. p. 486; 
and in the act of attainder of 
Francis Viscount Lovell, in the 
same year. Ibid. p. 503. On the 
accession of Henry VII., Sir 
Thomas Lovell was made Chan- 
cellor of the Exchequer, a Privy 
Councillor, and Speaker of the 
House of Commons. In 1 487 3 he 
was knighted at the battle of 
Stoke ; in 1502, was made Trea- 
surer of the Household, was a 
Knight of the Garter, and one 
of the Executors of Henry's will. 
By Henry the Eighth he was as 
much esteemed as by the pre- 
ceding monarch ; and he ap- 
pointed him Constable of the 
Tower, Surveyor of the Court 
of Wards, and Steward of his 
house. He died at Enfield, 25th 
of May, 1524. These Accounts 
state that he had advanced the 
Queen 100/. on plate. Notices 
of this person will be found in 
Blomfield's History of Norfolk, 
under the parish of Harling. 

Lute, to Giles, a luter, for strings 

for the Queen of Scots' lute, 29. 

A lute given to her sister the 

Princess Mary by her father in 

1504 cost 13*. 4</ Privy Purse 



Expenses of Henry VII. In those 
accounts is a notice of 13s. 4d. 
being paid to " Watt the luter 
that played the fool." Among 
the Hengrave Household Ex- 
penses, in 1573, is, " For string- 
ing, tuning, and fretting my mis- 
tresses lute, ij . vj d." Gage's 
History of Hengrave, p. 197- In 
the Antiquarian Repertory, ed. 
1807, vol. iii., p. 406, some cu- 
rious verses will be found, de- 
scriptive of various musical in- 
struments temp. Henry VII., 
from the Lodge at Lekingfeld. 
Lybert, John, goldsmith, 7, 10, 
64, 88. 

It seems that this person was 
often sent for from London to 
attend the Queen, and that on 
one occasion her majesty honored 
him and another goldsmith called 
Vanderf with a present of a buck 
between them. 

Lyer, for blue, 91. 

of thread, 65, 66. 

See LYOUR in the notes to the 
Wardrobe Accounts of Edward 
IV. infra. 

Lynche, Mr., 14, 59. 

A physician. " 14 th April 1492 
to Master Lynche the phisicon 
3/. 6*. 3d." Privy Purse Ex- 
penses of Henry Vll. 

Lynne, John, 104. 

A wheelwright of London. 
Machene, Robert, 69, 78. 

A taylor. 

Major, Nicholas, 1, 10, 14. 

The queen's sadler. Query if he 
was the " Nicholas Major " who 
was one of the commissioners for 
levying the aid in the borough of 
Southwark, for knighting the 
Prince of Wales in 1503. Rot. 
Parl. vi. p. 537. 

Malvesey, brought, 21. 

A misprint for Malwesey, i. e. 
Malmsey Wine. 

Marcazin, Janyn, 100. 
A minstrel. 

Marcle, co. Hereford, 110. 

This manor was one of those 
assigned for the queen's dower. 
Rot. Parl. vi. p. 462. 



208 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



Marquess, Lady, 59. 

Apparently Cicely, wife of Thomas 
Grey, 1st Marquess of Dorset, 
the queen's half brother. The 
marchioness was the daughter 
and heiress of William Baron 
Bonvile and Harington : after 
her husband's death, she mar- 
ried Henry Stafford, Earl of 
Wiltshire, and died in 1530. 
She held the manor of Multon, 
in Lincolnshire, which by her will 
she gave to her son Richard Grey. 

Mary, Lady, 12, 22. 

The queen's third daughter. She 
was born in 1498; and at the age 
of eighteen, married Louis XII. 
King of France ; after whose death 
she became the wife of Charles 
Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, and 
died on the 25th June, 1553. A 
further account of her will be 
found in the INTRODUCTORY 
REMARKS. 

Mason, to a, 26. 

Masses for saying, when the 
queen was ill, 37. 

Massy, Alice, the queen's mid- 
wife, 102. 

Her salary was 10/. per annum, 
which was the same sum as was 
granted to Margaret Cobbe, the 
wife of John Cobbe, midwife to 
Elizabeth, Queen of Edward the 
Fourth, on the 15th April, 1469. 
Rot. Parl. vi. p. 93. 

Mathew, Nicholas, 70. 

Yeoman of the queen's chamber. 

Maundy, clothes, &c. given to 
poor women on the queen's, 
1, 4, 74, 85. 

On Maunday Thursday it was cus- 
tomary for sovereigns and other 
persons of rank, in imitation of 
our Saviour, to wash the feet of 
as many poor people of their own 
sex as they were years old, and 
to give them clothes, food, money, 
&c. An account of the " Order 
of the Maundy, made at Green- 
wich, 19th March, 1572," is 
printed in the first volume of the 
Archceologia ; and the Northum- 
berland Household Book contains 
a minute description of the ar- 
ticles which were given by the 



Earls of Northumberland on that 
occasion, p. 354. At present, 
alms, &c. are distributed to the 
same number of persons, of both 
sexes, according to the age of the 
king, by the royal almoner ; but 
the more humiliating part of the 
ceremony is iiot performed, even 
by deputy. His Holiness the 
Pope, however, still adheres 
strictly to the ancient form, by 
annually washing the feet of se- 
veral poor people, and giving 
alms to each. It appears from the 
Northumberland Household Book, 
that the earl, or whoever per- 
formed the ceremony for him, 
wore a kind of mourning gown at 
the time, made of broad violet 
cloth, furred with black lamb, 
" containing two and a half 
keippes, after thirty skins in a 
kepe," p. 355. 

Medicines, for, 88. 
Merschet, Hans, 62. 
A mercer. 

Messagier, a, i. e. a messenger, 
100. 

Messages, for going, 63. 

Several notices relative to the 
King's Messengers occur on the 
Rolls of Parliament ; and in the 
12th Henry VI. the expenses of 
them were 200/. The Liber Quo- 
tidianus Garderolce of the 28th 
Edward I., and other wardrobe 
accounts of our early rnonarchs 
and princes, contain some cu- 
rious particulars of the messen- 
gers of the thirteenth and four- 
teenth centuries. In the Nor- 
thumberland Household Book, one 
division relates to ' k allowances 
of persons sent on messages," 
p. 118. 

Metingham, Agnes, 12. 

Middelmore, John, 108. 

Receiver of the revenues of the 
queen's lands in Herefordshire 
and Worcestershire. He was one 
of the commissioners in Worces- 
tershire for collecting the sub- 
sidy in 1496. Rot. I'arl. vi. 518. 

Midwife, the queen's, 102. 
Alice Massy. See MASSY. 
Milan, St. Peter of, 3. 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



209 



Milk, for, 14, 23, 56. 
Ministers of the king's chapel, 

23, 90. 
Minories, to the Abbess of the, 

8, 57. 

to nuns there, 8, 57. 

Minstrels, the queen's, 44, 91. 
coats of white and 

green sarcenet for, against 

" the disguising," 78. 

the King's, 78, 91. 

the Duke of York's, 



78. 

the Duke of Bucking- 
ham's, 78. 

the Queen of Scots', 

86. 

to a, that played on a 



droon, 2. 

wages of, 100. 



Dr. Percy has written so elabo- 
rately on the subject of minstrels 
that it is only necessary to refer 
to his essay. It appears from 
these Accounts that minstrels 
formed part of the establishment 
of every branch of the royal 
family, and of the household of 
other eminent noblemen. The 
wages of the queen's minstrels 
were 31. 6s. Qd. per annum 
each, and on every occasion, 
when she rewarded those of the 
king, of her daughter the queen 
of Scots, and others, it may be 
presumed that they played before 
her. It is evident that minstrels 
took a prominent part in all 
" disguisings," and other festivi. 
ties, on which occasions we learn 
that they wore the Tudor livery of 
white and green. 51. were paid 
to three string minstrels for their 
wages. Additional MS. 7099. 

Minster Lovel, 51, 56, 57, 59. 

In Oxfordshire. The queen was 
there on the 6th and 8th October, 
1502, on her progress into Wales. 

Mint, officers of the, 93. 

Forty shillings were given them 
in reward, in consequence of the 
queen's visit to the mint, in 
February, 1503. 



Miserden Park, in Gloucester- 
shire, 38. 

Misrule, to the Lord of, 91. 

A " Lord," or " Abbot, of Mis- 
rule," was always appointed at 
Christmas, in the king's house, 
wherever he lodged, as well as in 
the houses of all persons of con- 
sequence ; he presided over the 
sports and festivities at Christmas. 
Some observations on the Lord of 
Misrule will be found in the 
Archccologia, xviii. p. 313 ; in the 
Gentleman's Magazine, xlix. p. 
341 ; Brand's Popular Antiquities, 
and in Strutt's Sports and Pas- 
times. In a letter from the 
council of the household of the 
princess, afterwards Queen Mary, 
to Cardinal Wolsey, dated 27th 
November, 1527, they beg to be 
informed " for the great rejiaire 
of straungers supposed unto the 
Pryucesse honorable householde 
this solempne fest of Cristmas," 
of the Cardinal's pleasure " con- 
cernyng as well a ship of silver 
for the almes disshe requysite for 
her high estate, and spice plats, 
as also for trumpets and a rebek 
to be sent, and whither we shall 
appoynte any Lord of Mysrule 
for the said honorable householde, 
provide for enterluds, disgysyngs, 
or pleyes in the said fest, or for 
banket on twelf nyght." Ellis's 
Original Letters, First Series, i. 
p. 271. The " Lord of Misrule " 
was rewarded by the queen with 
twenty shillings, as much as was 
given to all the pages of her 
chamber. In the Privy Purse 
Expenses of Henry the Seventh, 
payments are noticed " To Bing- 
ley, Lord of Misrule, upon a prest, 
C ." " Bingeley, Abbot of Mis- 
rule." To the Abbot of Misrule 
in reward, 6/. 13*. 4</., " on new 
year's day, 1503." " The Abbot 
of Unreason" seems to have been 
another name for the same person. 
See a note to the Northumber* 
land Household Bvok, Ed. 1827, 
p. 441. 

Money borrowed for the queen, 
and for which her plate was 
pawned, 12, 110. 
In May, 1502, she borrowed 
2 E 



210 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



456/. 13. 4d., for part of which 
her plate was pawned, a practise 
common with many of our early 
sovereigns. In the Privy Purse 
Expenses of Henry VII. are the 
following entries relative to 
money borrowed by the queen. 
Anno 12 Hen. VII. " To the 
queen, to pay her debts, which 
is to be repaid, 2000/." Anno 16, 
" To the queen, in loan on cer- 
tain plate, 500/." and about 
two years after her majesty's de- 
cease, To " William Halyland, 
for plegging out of certain plate 
of the queen's, 102A" Additional 
MS. 7099. 

Money lent to the queen, 13, 
18, 77, 93. 

These items relate to trifling 
sums advanced by the queen's 
attendants for some immediate 
purpose, and which were soon 
afterwards repaid them. 

Monk, to a, for bringing our 
Lady's Girdle, 78. 
See GIRDLE. 

expenses of making a, 

97. 

These expenses could not be very 
great, as, together with the cost 
of his funeral, they only amounted 
to 13*. 4d. 

Monmouth, 38, bis, 39, 46, 47. 
The queen visited this place in 
August 1502. 

Moray, the bishop of, 67. 

Andrew Foreman was bishop of 
Moray from 1501 to 1516, when 
he was translated to St. Andrew's, 
and died in 1522. 

Mordaunt, John, serjeant-at-law, 
101. 

Father of John, 1st Lord Mor- 
dannt, and ancestor of the Earls 
of Peterborough and Monmouth. 
Though a lawyer, he commanded 
a division of the king's army at 
the battle of Stoke in 1484 ; was 
Speaker of the House of Com- 
mons in the 3rd Henry VII., 
Rot. Parl. vi. p. 386 ; was con- 
stituted King's Sergeant in the 
llth, and Justice of Chester in 
the 15th Henry VII., and soon 
after became Chancellor of the 



Duchy of Lancaster. Collins 
says he was knighted in February 
1503 and died in September 1504. 
Peerage, Ed. 1779, iii. p. 239- 
Mordaunt, William, attorney in 
the Common Pleas, 101. 
William Mordaunt, of Hemp- 
stead, in Essex, esq., younger 
brother of Sir John, and ancestor 
of the Mordaunts of Warwick- 
shire. He was chief prothonotary 
of the Common Pleas, and died 
in 15 18, Ibid. p. 238, and Edmond- 
son's Baronagium. 

Morgan, Griffith, 51. 

One of the queen's servants. 

Mortimer, 79. 

Stratfeld Mortimer, in Berkshire, 
which formed part of the lands 
assigned for the queen's dower. 
Rot. Parl. vi. p. 462. 

Worthy, 107. 

Mortimer, Sir John, 10. 

Probably the " John Mortimer, 
esquire for the king's body," 
who was protected from the 
effects of the act of Resumption, 
22 Edward IV. Rot. Parl. vi. p. 
201 ; and the " Sir John Morty- 
mer," who was protected in the 
office of steward of several lord- 
ships in Worcestershire and of 
the keepership of the Park of 
Nethewode, in Herefordshire, in 
the 1 Hen. VII. Ibid. p. 352 ; 
and who, in 1503, was one of the 
Commissioners in Worcestershire 
for levying the subsidy. Ibid. p. 
535. 

Mortlake, 85. 

Mouth, cook for the queen's, 78. 
See COOK. 

Montjoy, Lord, his child chris- 
tened, 35. 

William Blount, 4th Lord Mont- 
joy : he succeeded to the barony 
in 1485, and after filling many 
high situations under Henry the 
Seventli and Henry the Eighth, 
died in 1585. It may be inferred 
that her Majesty was sponsor to 
his child, who was christened in 
June or July 1502. 

Myklowe, John, 66. 

Clerk of the controulment of the 
king's household. 



INDEX AND NOTfiS. 



211 



Mylner, Richard, of Byndfeld, 
62. 

Nails, for, 103. 

Nanfan, Sir Richard, 107. 

A " Richard Nanfan, late of 
Trethowle Squyer," was attainted 
in the 1st Ric. III., but his at- 
tainder was reversed in the 1 Hen. 
VII. A person of those names, 
and an esquire, if it was not the 
same individual, was protected in 
the enjoyment of the offices of 
steward of the lordship of Tewks- 
bury, and keeper of the lodge and 
park there ; of steward of the 
lordship of Elmley in the county 
of Worcester, &c., and in the 
office of sheriff of that county, 
by the act of Resumption, 1 
Hen. VII. ; in all grants made 
to him, by a similar act, in the 3rd 
Hen. VII. ; and by the name of 
" Sir Richard Nanfan, Knight," 
it was enacted in the 4 Hen. VII. 
that the reversal of the attainder 
of John Beaumont, Esq. should 
not affect the lands of Tregonan, 
in Cornwall, but that he should 
hold and enjoy the same. Rot. 
Part. vi. pp. 246, 273, 360, 406, 
413. There was an ancient Corn- 
ish family of Nanfan of Trethe- 
well, many of which were she- 
riffs of Cornwall in the fifteenth 
century, and which became ex- 
tinct in the male line in the six- 
teenth century. A branch of the 
Nanfan family was settled in 
Worcestershire, and a copious 
pedigree of them occurs in Nash's 
history of that county. 

Nattres, Natarasse, orNotarice, 
James, 11, 80, 89, 96. 
One of the queen's servants. 

Neltnes, Thomas, 9. 

Another of the queen's servants. 

Neville, Lady, 2. 
See DARCY. 

New Year's Gifts, 90, 91, 98. 

Newbury, 80. 

Norfolk, Duchess of, 5. 

The person thus designated 
must, it is presumed, have been 
Elizabeth, daughter and sole 



heir of Sir Frederick Tilney, 
then the wife of Thomas Howard 
Earl of Surrey, son and heir 
of John first Duke of Norfolk, 
which dukedom was at that 
time in the crown by the duke's 
attainder, and the earl was not 
created Duke of Norfolk until 
1514, eight years after her death. 
It is consequently not a little ex- 
traordinary that she should be 
styled Duchess of Norfolk in 1502 ; 
but as the widow of Johq^ the 
first duke died in 1494, there was 
no other person to whom the title 
of duchess of Norfolk could be 
attributed. She was ordered to 
receive the wife of Edmond de 
la Pole, the queen's nephew, who 
bore the title of Earl of Suffolk, 
apparently by courtesy only, the 
dukedom having been forfeited 
by his elder brother John de la 
Pole Earl of Lincoln, in 1487, 
and who was attainted for sup- 
porting Perkin Warbek, in the 
19 Hen. VII. 1503. Rot. Part. 
vi. p. 545. The " Duchess of 
Norfolk" was present at the re- 
ception of Katherine of Arragon 

in the 1? Henry VII., 1502-3 

Antiquarian Repertory, ed. 1807- 
vol.ii., p. 290*, 291*. 

Northleache in Gloucestershire, 
44. 

Northampton, to the Holy Rood 
of, and our Lady of Grace 
there, 3, 37. 

Northumberland, Earl of, 39. 
Henry Algernon Percy, K. G. 
5th Earl. He succeeded to the 
earldom in 1489, and died in 1527- 

Norwich, Bishop of, 90. 

Richard Nekke, or Nyk, dean of 
the king's chapel ; he was con- 
firmed in this see in 1501, and 
died 1536. 

Notarice. See NATTRES. 

Notley, a Priory in Bucking- 
hamshire, 32, 40, 50. 
The queen was there in July 
1502, and a messenger was sent to 
her at that place to know'where she 
wished that her nephew, Lord 
Edward Courtenay, should be 
buried. 

2 E 2 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



Nuns in the Minorics, donations 

to, 57. 
Nun, expenses of making a, 37. 

a buck brought for the 

professing of a, 47. 
The expenses on this occasion 
amounted to 6/. 13*. 4rf., and a 
feast appears to have been part of 
the ceremony, as a buck was spe- 
cially sent from Harold. 
Nurse, to a lady that was to have 
been the queen's, 62. 

. of the Lord Edward 

Courtenay, 103. 

to a French woman, that 

was to have been the queen's, 
69. 

These persons seem to have of- 
fered themselves as the queen's 
nurse in the confinement which 
proved fatal to her ; but neither 
appears to have been accepted. 
Each was, however, rewarded 
with 6s. 8d. for her trouble in 
coming. 

to the queen's brother's, 

75. 

This item displays the affection 
which the queen bore to her un- 
fortunate brother the young Duke 
of York, who, with Edward the 
Fifth, was said to have been mur- 
dered in the Tower. The dona- 
tion, though trifling in itself, was 
a special mark of favour, as the 
poor woman is not included in 
the thirty-seven who received the 
Maundy. Particular attention 
was paid by the royal family ^o 
their nurses and old servants, as 
is exemplified by many entries in 
these accounts. Henry the Fifth, 
in 1415, granted Joan Warren, 
his nurse, 20/. for life. Calend. 
Rot. Parl. p. 264. In the 28th 
Hen. VI., Joan, widow of Thomas 
Astley, esquire, " oure servaunt 
and late oure norice," was pro- 
tected in the enjoyment of an an- 
nuity of 2<M. for her life out of the 
fee farm of Queenhithe, in the 
city of London, and also in the 
sum of 30/., parcel of an annuity 
of 40, granted her by letters pa- 
tent out of the revenues of the 
County of Warwick ; and in the 



34th Hen. VI. she was secured 
in the enjoyment of forty marks, 
parcel of fifty marks, yearly 
granted her by letters patent for 
her life. Rot. Parl., 199, 319. 
Philip Ap Hoell, who is described 
in the act of Resumption, 3 Hen. 
VII., as " oure old servaunt and 
well beloved nurriour," -was pro- 
tected in the grant of the Por- 
treaveship of Lanvayl in Buelld, 
with the toll of that town, and 
the toll of Elvale, in the marches 
of Wales. Rot. Parl. vi. 406. 
The following entries occur in 
the Privy Purse Expenses of that 
Monarch : " To the King's 
nurse's son ;" " To the Queen's 
drynorisse, in reward, 3J. 6s. 3d." 
on the 31st May, 1503, who may 
be presumed, from the date, to 
have been the person who at- 
tended her in her last illness. 

Obit of the King's father, 55. 
See KING'S FATHER. 

Obourne, L e. Holborn, Abbot 
of, 53. 

Odiham, 107. 

Keeper of the Park of, 

84. 

In the county of Southampton. 
Nicholas Gaynesford and John 
Gaynesford, Esquires, were se- 
cured in the enjoyment of the 
offices of Steward of the Lordship 
of Odiham, the Constableship and 
Portership of the Castle of Odi- 
ham, with the keeping of the 
park and warren, which had been 
granted to them for their lives, 
by the act of Resumption, in the 
1st Hen. VII. Rot. Parl. vi. 384. 

Offerings, for the Queen's, 1, 3, 
6, 10, 12, 13, 19, 22, 23, 27, 
29, 31, bis, 36,37, 38, 39, 42, 
50, 53,54,64, 65, 67, 77,78, 
83, 84, 87, 88, 97. 
The whole amount paid as the 
Queen's offerings between the 24th 
March, 1 502, and February, 1503, 
was about 32/. 10*. The dona- 
tions varied from 4d. to 21. 6s. 8d. 
in proportion to the reputation of 
the shrine ; and on one occasion 
a plyte of lawn was bought for a 
shirt for the Child of Grace at 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



213 



Reading, which, with the making, 
cost 5. 4d. Besides sending offer- 
ings at certain times to various 
shrines, her Majesty k ' offered" 
to the nearest saint to the places 
through which she passed on her 
progress, and also bestowed alms 
on all the hermits and anchoresses 
on her road. Several pages of the 
Northumberland Household Book 
are filled with an account of the 
offerings of the Earl and Coun- 
tess of Northumberland, and their 
children, pp . 332338. 

Ointment, for, 103. 

Grease for the wheels of the 
queen's car. 

Oranges, brought, 4, 43, 87, 93. 
Oxford, 45, 59. 

fee farm of the city of, 

108. 
Earl of, 87. 



John de Vere, K.G., Lord High 
Admiral and Great Chamberlain. 
He was restored to the honours 
forfeited by his father in 1464, 
attainted in 1474, again restored 
in 1485 ; and died without issue 
in 1513. 

Packthread, for, 65. 

Pages and grooms of the Queen's 
Chamber, rewards to the, 78, 
91. 

Palfreyman, the, 17. 
Richard Payne. 

Painting, 36. 

The only entry in these accounts 
relative to painting or painters is 
that, on the 3rd August, 1502, 
three shillings and fourpence were 
given in reward to Robert Fyll, 
the King's painter, and that on 
the same day, John Reynold, 
painter, received 10s. " for mak- 
ing of divers beasts and other 
pleasures" for the Queen, at Wind- 
sor, and which it would seem did 
not require much talent ; hence 
it is probable that he was little 
superior to a sign-painter of the 
present day. In the Privy Purse 
Expenses of Henry the Seventh, 
are entries of twenty shillings be- 
ing paid " to Maynard the King's 
painter for pictures ; " 4. to 
" Thomas Painter for painting ;" 



" To Thomas Stirr for painting 
two tabernacles, 61. ;" and " To 
Robert Fylle, for making of the 
same, 81." " For making and 
painting of knotts, 661. 13s. 4d." 
The two last named persons, 
Maynard and John Reynolds, 
were probably the best artists of 
their times in England ; but 
" Thomas Painter," it may be 
presumed, was a house-painter, 
one or more of whom were at- 
tached to the royal and other 
great establishments. See Col. 
lection of Regulations of the Royal 
Household, and the Northumber- 
land Household Book, where "j 
paynter " is mentioned among the 
Earl's workmen in the same pas- 
sage with the joiner and smith, 
pp. 255, 390. In the Church- 
wardens' Accounts of St. Marga- 
ret's, Westminster, in!531, is this 
entry : " Paid to Renaeever, payn- 
tour, for paynting and gylding 
of the LX storys of St. Marga- 
rett's tabernacle, 31. 6s. 8d.," and 
for " guilding of the small ta- 
bernacle, 21. 8s. " Nichols's Il- 
lustrations of Ancient Times, p. 
10. Among the New Year's 
Gifts to Queen Mary, in 1556, by 
Suete, painter, is a table painted 
of the Queen's marriage. Ibid. 
p. 14. 

Palfreys, for keeping, 17. 

Pallet, Edward, 76, 97. 

Son of Lady Jane Bangham. 
This lad appears to have been 
wholly supported at the Queen's 
expense, and, like her nephews 
the Courtenays, was under the 
care of Dame Margaret Cotton, 
as payments were made to that 
lady for his diet, clothes, and school 
hire, and the allowance for his 
board was fully equal to that for 
his more illustrious companions. 
It would be vain to inquire 
into the cause of his being thus 
patronized ; nor have any other 
particulars of him been disco- 
vered. -See BANGHAM. 

Paned, curtains, 65. 

" Paned, variegated, composed of 
small squares, as a counterpane 
usually is." Todift Johnson. See 
" Pane " in the Index to the 



214 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



Wardrobe Accounts of Edward 
IV., infra. 

Pantry, gentleman of the, 96. 
Richard Brampton. 

Paper, for, 102. 
Parchment, for, 102. 
Pardon, for a letter of the Ju- 
bilee, 12. 
See JUBILEE. 

of the Mo- 
nastery of St. Katherine's 
Mount, in Sinai, 21. 

the Queen's offering to 



the coffer for her, 1. 
The Queen's payment to the 
poor-box in performance of some 
of the conditions for obtaining the 
Easter indulgence. In 1491 the 
Marquess of Berkeley ordered in 
his will that his executors should 
purchase a pardon from Rome, as 
large as might be had for plain 
remission of the sins of all those 
who shall be confessed and con- 
trite, at Longebrigge [a chapel in 
the parish of Berkeley] from even 
song to even song, on the feast of 
the Trinity, and there say pater- 
nosters, and three aves for his 
soul, and the souls of his father 
and son. Chaucer's description 
of one of those itinerant venders 
of mercy and relicks, who 
" Bret-ful of pardon come from 

Rome all hot," 

And who, " with fained flatter- 
ing and japes, 
made the persone and the peple 

his apes" 

is well known. Of this character 
probably were the two Monks of 
St. Katherine's Mount, in Sinai, 
and the monk who brought Our 
Lady's girdle to the Queen. In 
the Privy Purse Expenses of 
Henry VIII., in June, 1511, is 
an entry of 20s. " For the King's 
offering at Westminster, and for 
taking of the Pardon, there, at 
Ascencion Tide." Add. MS. 7100. 

Parker, ,79. 

One of the Queen's servants. 

Paston, William, 4. 

Page of the Queen's beds. 



Patch, , 74, 93. 

Mr. Douce has suggested that 
Patch was another designation 
for a fool ; and the conjecture is 
in this instance confirmed by an 
entry in the Privy Purse Expenses 
of Henry the Seventh, of money 
given lt To Patch the Fool, in 
reward," who appears to have 
been principally concerned in ar- 
ranging the Disguisings. Set 
DISGUISINGS. 

Pawmpelion, a fur so called, 33, 
89. 

This word occurs in the same 
sense in the Privy Purse Expenses 
of Henry VIII. in 1532. " Forxxv 
dousin skynns of fyne pawmpe- 
lion, be li ;" and in the account 
book of Lord Burghley, among 
the apparel bought for Anne of 
Cleves, was " A gown of black 
wrought vellett, furred with paw- 
pillon,viij li." The price of thos 
skins in 1503 and 1530 was nearly 
the same. The word does not 
occur in any glossary, and the 
Editor conjectures, from the 
name, that they were skins 
brought from Pampellone, a town 
in the department of Tarn, twelve 
miles from Alby, but Mr. Gage 
suggests that Pampeluna fur is 
meant. 

Payne, Master Richard, 1, 5, 
67, 97. 
The Queen's almoner. 

Richard, 17. 

The Queen's palfreyman then 
deceased. 

Pears, brought, 38. 
Pease cods, brought, 16. 
Peche, Dame Elizabeth, 99. 

One of the Queen's gentlewomen. 
Penson, Robert, 97. 

A skinner. 

Pepins, 9, 15, 39. 
Percy, Lady Anne, 21, 26, 28, 
37, 43, 49, 51, 54, 70, 78. 

Though not mentioned in the 
list in p. 99, she was undoubtedly 
one of the Queen's gentlewomen, 
and appears to have been in con- 
stant attendance from June to 
December, 1502. By the name 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



215 



of "Lady Anne Percy," she re- 
ceived an annuity of 201. until 
1st Hen. rill, \5QQ.-Additional 
MS. 7100. She was probably 
Anne, 2nd daughter of Henry 
Percy, 4th Earl of Northumber, 
who married William Fitz Alan, 
Earl of Arundel, about the 28th 
December, 1510, 2 Hen. VIII., 
when the King paid 6s. 8d. for his 
offering at her marriage. Ibid. . 

Performing, i. e. for making a 
horse harness, gown, &c., 17. 

Pertriche, John, 104, 105. 

The son of a person called " Mad 
Beale," who was supported at the 
Queen's expense. The reason of 
his being so patronised is un- 
known, but it probably arose 
from motives of charity, arising 
from his parent's infirmity. That 
one of the entries about him 
should be mentioned in Accounts 
intended for the Queen's eye is 
strongly indicative of the coarse 
manners of the time. 

Petreson, Evan, 7. 
A joiner. 

Petticoats, for, 22, 70. 

Pevesham, 66. 

forest of, 46. 

Pew, Our Lady of, 4, 22, 23, 77, 
78. 

Of Westminster. Our Lady of 
Pity or Mercy, an image of the 
Virgin Mary, sitting with our 
Saviour on her lap. 

Pheasants, brought, 62. 

Phip, William, 6, 26, 61. 

Alia* William Worthy ; these 
payments were for boarding Wil- 
liam the Queen's fool, for which 
he was allowed two shillings a 
month. 

Physician, a, sent for, 96. 

The queen died in childbed on the 
llth of February, 1502-3 ; and it 
is evident that this payment was 
for the expenses of the messenger 
who was sent by the king's com- 
mand to fetch Doctor Hallyls- 
worth out of Kent to attend her 
majesty when she became in dan- 
ger. The names of most of the 
physicians mentioned in these ac- 



counts, and in the Privy Purse Ex- 
penses of Henry the Seventh and 
Eighth, are here collected. Those 
noticed in the queen's expenses 
are Doctors Halyllysworth, and 
Master Lynch. In the expenses 
of Henry the Seventh, the follow, 
ing names occur : " To Master 
Lewes, the queen's physician, 
2/.;" "Ralph Sentiler;" "Master 
Domynys, the physician ;" "Vin- 
cent Wolf, the physician ; " 
" Master Guilliam, the physi- 
cian. " Beiiet Fentre was ano- 
ther of the physicians of Henry 
VII., with a salary of 40/. per 
ann., and was keeper of the 
prince's wardrobe in London. 
Rot. Part. vi. 355. In the 2nd 
Hen. VIII., " Master Lewes, 
the Princess of Castile's physi- 
cian, was paid 100/. for his re- 
ward in gold ;" and in 1532, Doc- 
tor Yakisley is noticed in the 
Privy Purse Expenses of that 
year. 

Pieces of copper, to ornament 
the jackets against the disguis- 
ing, 21. 

Pilgrimage, costs for, person 
sent on, by the queen, 3, 4,96. 
Vicarious pilgrimages were by 
no means uncommon. Queen 
Katherine of Arragon desired in 
her will that some person should 
go to Our Lady of Walsingham 
in pilgrimage, and in going by 
the way dole twenty nobles. 
William de Beauchamp, in 12C8, 
speaks of his son Walter being 
signed with the cross for a pil- 
grimage to the Holy Land on the 
behalf of his father and mother. 
Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of 
Hereford, in 1361, desired that 
a chaplain of good condition might 
be sent to Jerusalem, principally 
for himself and his parents, who 
was to say masses by the way at 
all times that he could conve- 
niently do so for their and his 
souls ; and also that a good and 
loyal man should be sent to Can- 
terbury and to offer there 40s. in 
silver for him, and another to 
Pomfret to offer the same sum at 
the tomb of Thomas Earl of 



216 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



Lancaster. Sir John North- 
wodeof Kent, in 1378, desired 
that two pilgrims might be sent 
to visit the shadow of St. Peter, 
St. Paul, and St. James in Galacia. 
Sir Richard -Arunde), in 1416, or- 
dered his executors to find a man 
who, for the good of his soul, 
should go to Rome, to the Holy 
Land, to the sepulchre of our 
Lord, and to the Holy Blood in 
Germany ; and William Ponte 
of Kent, in 1471, bequeathed a 
shilling to any one who would 
" pilgrimage for him " to St. 
Thomas of Canterbury : but the 
most striking instance of dele- 
gating religious duties is that of 
Sir Roger Beauchamp in 1379, 
who says in his will, " Whereas 
I am bound to do a service on the 
infidels by desire of my grand- 
sire, Sir Walter Beauchamp, to 
the expense of two hundred 
marks, I will that Roger, son to 
Roger, my son, shall perform the 
same when he becomes of age ; " 
the fulfilment of the obligation 
being thus postponed for four 
generations. The queen adopted 
this easy method of settling with 
her conscience on three occa- 
sions: once, by sending a priest to 
make offerings in her name to 
shrines at Windsor, Eton, Read- 
ing, Caversham, Cockthorpe, 
Northampton, Walsingham, Sud- 
bury, and Ipswich, who was oc- 
cupied on his pious tour twenty- 
six days, and was allowed for 
his expenses and trouble ten- 
pence a-day; secondly, to a per- 
son, who does not appear to have 
been a priest, for going to various 
shrines in Kent, who was so em- 
ployed at the same wages for 
eight days ; and lastly, by send- 
ing a man in pilgrimage to Our 
Lady of Wilsdon in February, 
1503, who received 3*. 4< for 
his trouble. An interesting ar- 
ticle on shrines and pilgrimages 
will be found in the Retrospective 
Review, New Series, vol. ii. p. 301, 
and some remarks on the subject 
occur in the review of the Itine- 
rary of Fitz Simeon, in the same 
volume. 
Pins, for the queen's litter, 45. 



Pin-powder, for, 27. 

Query, powder for cleaning pins. 
Plate, paid for, which had been 

burnt in a fire at Richmond, 

92. 

pawned, 12, 110. 

See MoXET. 

for attendance with the 

queen's, 75. 

Pleasures, for painting beasts, 

and other, 36. 
The word is used in a similar 
sense in the ordinance for the 
royal household 17 Henry VIII. 
" Dispoile of pleasures and com- 
modities in nobleman's houses to 
be left." Also such ''pleasures and 
commodities as they have about 
their houses, that is to say, deer, 
fish, orchards, hay," &c. p. 145. 
Mr. Gage remarks that in the 
survey of Thornbury in Glouces- 
tershire on the attainder of Ed- 
ward Duke of Buckingham in 
1521, the gardens are mentioned 
as set " with rooses and other 
pleasures." " Pleasure grounds" 
is still in use. 
Plomer, Mr. Christopher, 37, 

62. 

One of the queen's chaplains. 
Probably the Christopher Plum- 
mer who was collated to the Pre- 
bendary of Cadington, in St. 
Paul's, 9th July, 1515, and who 
became a Canon of Windsor, but 
was deprived by attainder for re- 
fusing the oath of supremacy in 
1536. Wood's Fasti Oxonienses 
by Bliss, i. 78. 

Plyte of lawn, for a shirt, 50. 
The word plig ht occurs in the sta- 
tute respecting lawns in 1463; (See 
LAWN) which induced Blount 
in his Law Dictionary to think it 
meant " a measure then in use, 
as yard or ell now." " Playte of 
a gown," the only word like it 
in Palsgrave's Esclarcissements de 
la Langue Francoyse in 1590, he 
translates ply. 

Points, for jackets, 21. 

of silk for a litter, 45. 

Pole, Henry, 9. 

One of the queen's servants. 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



217 



Pole, William, 35, 36, 42, 49, 
58, bis, 93, 95. 
A groom of the chamber, whose 
wages were lOd. a-day. 

Pomegranets, brought, 74, 93. 

Pomfret, 78. 

Popingay, a, brought, 30. 

Popyncote, Joan, 23. 

This person, who, it may be pre- 
sumed, was one of the queen's 
servants, was living in the 1st 
Henry VIII., as in that year fifty 
shillings were paid to her. Addi- 
tional MS. in the British Mu- 
seum, 7100. 

Pork, chines of, brought, 64. 

Porters, at the gate, 2. 

Possenet, mending a, 32. 

A little bason, a porringer, a skil- 
let. Todd's Johnson. Palsgrave 
mentions " Posnet, alyttlepotte," 
but he gives no translation of the 
word. In the inventory of the 
goods of Sir Peter Freshevile in 
1581, is this entry, " Item, brass 
potts and posnets with a chaufer, 
xlvj s. viij d." Nichols's Illustra- 
tions of Ancient Times, p. 234. 

Pote, Joan, 82. 
An embroiderer. 

Pox, the French, for healing a 
person of the, 105. 

Poyntz, William, 109. 

Receiver of the queen's revenues 
in Essex. 

Priests, to, for singing at vari- 
ous places, 102. 

Primer, for a, 105. 

The cost of a primer and psalter 
was Is. 6d. In the 18 Hen. VII. 
6/. 13*. 8d. were given to Friar 
Hercules for a psalter, which it 
must be inferred from the price 
was illuminated. 

Prince, the, to one of his foot- 
men, 52. 

the marriage of the, 1. 

jewellery bought against 

his marriage, 66. 
" The Prince " was Arthur, 
Prince of Wales, the queen's 
eldest son, who was born Sep- 
tember 20, 1486 ; married Kathe- 
rine of Arragon on the 14th of 



November, 1501 ; and died on 
the 2nd of April, 1502. 

Prince, his schoolmaster, 28. 

a servant of, 52. 

a minstrel of, 78. 

Henry, then Prince of Wales, 
the queen's second son, after- 
wards King Henry the Eighth. 
The entry relating to the school- 
master may, however, refer to 
his deceased brother. 

Princess, the, 10, 14, 43, 48, 
54, 61. 

Each of these entries alludes 
to Katherine of Arragon, the 
widow of Prince Arthur, and they 
admit of the inference that she 
was treated with great attention 
by her mother-in-law. 

Psalter, for a, 105. 

The price of a psalter and primer 
was 20d. See PRIMER. 

Privy Seal, fool of the Lord, 91. 

See FOOL. 
Prothonotary of Spain, 4. 

A person who probably came over 
with the princess Katherine. 
Puddings, brought, 10, 64. 
Purse, money for the queen's, 2, 
5, 7, 9, 11, 12, bis, 13, 17, 
18, bis, 20, 21, bis, 23, bis, 
24, bis, 26, bis,28, 31,33, 34, 
37, 41, 43, bis, 48, bis, 49, 51, 
53, 54, 57, 62, 63, 76, 78, 80, 
84, 89, 91. 

Money for the queen's personal 
expenses, or, for pocket-money. 
Purfle, 16, 83. 

A kind of border, hem, or rather, 
trimming of gowns. Palsgrave, 
in 1530, translates " Purfyll a 
hemme of a gowne" by " bort." 
In the 3?th Edw. III. esquires 
and gentles below the rank of 
knights who had not lands of the 
value of 1001. a-year, and their 
wives, daughters, and children 
were forbidden to wear " ascun 
revers ou purfil." Rot.Parl.il. 
278, 281. Chaucer, speaking of 
the Monk, says, 
" I saw his sieves purfiled at the 

hond, 

With gris and that the finest of 
the lond." 

2 F 



218 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



Eleanor Lady Walsyngham be- 
queathed her daughter " a purfle 
of sable" in 1506. Purfle, in 
p. 83, is used as a verb, and there 
means to embroider, crule being 
twisted yarn. In the inventory 
of the effects of Sir John Fas- 
tolfe is " j gowne of blewe fel- 
wett upon felwet longe furrid 
withe martyrs and perfold of the 
same, slevys sengle.' ' Arckceo- 
loffia, xxi. 252. 

Pursuivant of the King's Cham- 
berlain, 87. 

Pyle cloth, a, 65. 

No other instance of the use of 
this word has been discovered. 
A Pyle cloth seems to have been a 
kind of tester or canopy with 
curtains. 

Quails, brought, 13. 

Queen, ill, 37. 

a physician sent after, for 

the, 96. 
brother, of the, 75. 

The young Duke of York. See 

NURSE. 

lands, charged with, 

money for the king's use, 76. 
revenues, 107 111. 

Rabbits, brought, 13. 
Ragdale, Robert, 22, 34, 54. 

A tailor. 

Ragland, 40,41, bis, 43,46, 49, 
50, 53, 109. 

Her majesty was at Ragland on 

the 19th and 24th of August, 

1502. 
Ratclif, Mrs. Mary, 99. 

One of the queen's gentlewomen. 

Rauf, John, 34, 103. 

Yeoman of the close car. 

Rawlenny, , wife of, 55. 

Reading, child of grace of, 3, 

50. 
Receipts of the queen's revenue, 

107110. 
Reed, Mr., 59. 
Relick Sunday, 31. 

The third Sunday after Midsum- 
mer-day. 



Reliques at Westminster, the, 56, 

Reynold, John, 79. 

painter, 36. 

Whether he was the same indi- 
vidual as is mentioned in p. 79 } is 
doubtful. See PAINTING. 

Walter, 102. 

Keeper of the garden at Bay- 
nard's Castle. 

Rhenish wine, brought, 52. 
Ribbands, for, 51. 
Richmond, 2, 4, 6, bis, 11, 13. 
14, 15, 17, 18,23,24,26,32, 
33, 34, 35, 36, 39, 40, 42, 49, 
53, 54, 57, 59, 60, 72, 81, 83, 
84, 87, bis, 92, 94, 95, 98. 
It is manifest that the queen 
passed great part of her time at 
Richmond, and that the rest was 
divided between Greenwich, the 
Tower, and Westminster, or in 
visiting places near town. 

the residence of the 

queen at, burnt, 92. 

Ricroft, John, 100. 

One of the queen's servants. 

Rivers, Earl, to a person in 
whose house the earl lodged 
at the time of his death, 78. 
Anthony Wydville, Earl Rivers, 
the queen's uncle, was beheaded 
at Pomfret in June 1483, by com- 
mand of Richard Duke of Glou- 
cester, afterwards Richard the 
Third ; and this entry is another 
proof of the readiness with which 
Elizabeth relieved those jvho 
had, in however humble a degree, 
assisted any of her kindred. 

Robes, for making, 40. 

yeoman of the Queen's, 

his bills, 105. 
Robynet, 13, 29, 55, 82, 86. 

The queen's embroiderer. It 
does not appear whether this was 
his baptismal or surname. He 
was boarded and lodged at the 
queen's charge. 

Rochester, Bishop of, 52. 

Richard Fitz James, the de- 
scendant of an ancient Somerset- 
shire family, and uncle of Sir 
John Fitz James, Chief Justice 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



219 



from 1 526 to 1539 ; he was Bishop 
of Rochester from the 17th May 
1497 to January 1504, when he 
was translated to Chichester, and 
thence, in August 1506, to Lon- 
don, and died January 15, 1522. 
Rockers, to, 100, 103. 

The situation of rocker to the 
royal family yet exists. Those 
mentioned in these accounts were 
rockers to the queen's nephews 
and niece, the children of her 
sister Lady Katharine Courtenay, 
arid the wages of one were thirty 
shillings per annum, but the time 
for which the others were paid is 
not stated. Mr. Ellis has printed 
a warrant, which he styles a let- 
ter, from Henry the Seventh, to 
the treasurer and chamberlains 
of the exchequer, commanding 
them to pay the arrears of wages 
due to Lady Darcy " Lady Mais- 
tres," and " five markes sterlinges 
unto oure welbeloved Agnes But- 
ler and Emly Hobbes, rockers of 
our said son, that is to say to 
every of them, xxxiijs. iiijd. for 
their wages of the half yere, ended 
at Easter last passed." Original 
Letters, Second Series, i. p. 170. 
Whence it seems that their wages 
were 61. 12*. 8d. each more than 
those of the rockers of the young 
Courtenays. The servants in 
the nursery of the Earl of Nor- 
thumberland in 1512, consisted 
of " two rokkers and a childe to 
attend in nursery." Northum- 
berland Household Book, p. 43. 
In the Regulations ordained by 
Henry VII., under the " Array 
of her Majesty's infants," it is 
provided that the child shall " be 
hadde into the nursery where it 
shall be nourished with a lady 
governour to the nursery nurse, 
with four Chamberers, called 
Rockers, and the chamberlaine to 
give them their othes." p. 127- 

Roke, William, of Kidlington, 
34. 
Apparently a wheelwright. 

Rolf, John. 
See RAUF. 

Roper, Henry,' 10, 19, 36, 40, 
41,49,53, 58, 71,72, 98. 
Page of the beds. His duties were 



to go messages, purchase articles, 
to attend the queen in her pro- 
gresses and journeys, to prepare 
for her reception, &c. : his wages 
were 8d. a day. 

Roses for crewel to purfle, 83. 
See CREWEL and PITRFLE. 



brought, 21. 



Roundseval, the fraternity of Our 
Lady of, 21 . 

A cell of St. Mary de Ronceval 
stood on the site of Northumber- 
land House. 

Russet, gown of, 17. 

A coarse cloth. In the 37th 
Edward III., 1363, servants of 
husbandry and other persons not 
having goods or chattels worth 
40s., were forbidden to wear any 
other apparel than what was made 
of blanket and russet cloths of the 
value of \2d. a yard. Rot. Parl. 
ii., 279282. 

.. cotton for the queen's 

car, 104. 

Russet is denned to be a reddish 
brown. Dr. Johnson observes, 
" Newton seems to use it for 
grey, but, if the etymology be re- 
garded, improperly." Palsgrave, 
however, in 1530, translates 
" Russet," by " Gra," grey. 

Rutt, , 85. 

The queen's shoemaker. 

Sadlers, to, 92. 
Sadler, Nicholas, 104. 
Saddle, for covering a, 17. 
St Adrean, offering to, 3. 
St. Alban's, Monastery of, 109. 

. payments to the 

Anchoresses of St. Peter and 
St. Michael near, 1, 102. 
St. Amand, Lord, 44, 45, 46, 
47, 48, 67. 

Richard Beauchamp, Lord St. 
Amand, who succeeded his father 
in that dignity in 1457, was at- 
tainted in 1483, restored in the 
1st Hen. VII., and died without 
legitimate issue in 1508. All 
these entries relate to bucks sent 
by him to the queen. 
2 F 2 



220 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



St. Anne in the Wood, near 
Bristol, 42. 

In the Itinerary of William of 
Worcester is a notice " De ca- 
pella St. Annae per duo miliaria 
de Bristollia," in the forest of 
Kingswood. D. 

St. Augustine, offering to, 3. 
St. Bennett's, London, parson 

of, 25. 
St. Clement, the Fraternity of, 

without Temple Bar, 86. 
St. Dominick, offering to, 3. 
St. Edward, of Westminster, of- 
fering to, 56. 

St. Francis, offering to, 3. 
St. Fredeswide, of Oxford, of- 
ferings to, 36, 39. 
St. George, offering to, 42. 
St. Ignasi, offering to, 3. 
St. John, offering to, 14. 
St. Paul's, offering to, 81. 

the rood of the north 

door in, and our Lady of 
Grace there, 3. 
St. Saviour, offering to, 4. 
St. Sepulchre, London, the fra- 
ternity of Corpus Christi, in 
the parochial church of, 9. 
St. Sinai, Katherine's Mount in, 
two friars of the monastery 
of, 21. 
St. Ursula, brotherhood of, in 

London, 77. 
Salisbury, Bishop of, 90. 

Edmund Audley was bishop of 
Salisbury from 2nd April, 1502, 
to the 23rd August, 1524, when 
he died. 

Sampler, an ell of linen cloth 
bought for one for the Queen, 
30. 

Sand, for, 80. 
Sandys, Sir William, 70. 

Apparently the first Lord San- 
dys, a distinguished favourite 
both with Henry the Seventh and 
Henry the Eighth. 
Sarcenets, 9, 16, 19, 22, 32, 34, 
51, 54. 
By statute 17th Edward IV., 



1477? the wives and unmarried 
daughters of persons having pos- 
sessions of the yearly value of 
201. or upwards, were permitted 
" to use and were in their colers, 
ventes and slefes of their gownes 
and hukes sateyn chamelet, sar- 
cenet or tarteron." The wives 
and unmarried daughters of per- 
sons whose possessions yielded 40s. 
and upwards per annum, might 
also use sarcenets and tarterons in 
this manner. Rot. Par I. vi. 189. 

Sarvington, Walter, 107. 

Receiver of the queen's reve- 
nues in the counties of Wilts, 
Berks, and Southampton. 

Satin, for, 8, 9, 15, 16, 17, 66, 
69. 

By statute 3rd and 4th Edward 
IV., 14G3-4, the use of damask 
and satin was confined to esquires 
and yeomen of the King's house- 
hold ; to sergeants, esquires, and 
gentlemen, having possessions of 
the yearly value of 40/. ; and to 
persons of higher rank. Rot. 
Parl. v. 504 b . See also statute 
22nd Edward IV., Ibid. vi. 221, 
and SARCENET, supra. 

Savernake, forest of, in Wilt- 
shire, 67. 

This forest was confirmed in 
dower to Elizabeth, Queen of 
Edward I V. Rot. Parl. v. 62?. 

Saucery, the, 2. 

The Saucery was, it seems, the de- 
partment in the King's household 
which provided the sauces. In 
the 33rd Hemy VI., the officers of 
the saucery consisted of a ser- 
geant, clerk, yeoman and groom 
for the King's mouth, and of a 
yeoman and three grooms for the 
hall. Regulations of the Royal 
Household, 4to. 1790, p. *22. In 
the l?th Henry VIII., in the 
statutes of Eltham, the duties of 
the clerk and yeoman of " the 
pastry and sausery" are defined ; 
the principal of which were to see 
all their baked meats well season- 
ed and served, according to the 
appointment of the clerk of the 
kitchen, " without embessellihg 
or giveing away any of the same, 
and also that there be no wasteful 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



221 



expenses made of flower nor 
sawce within the said office." 
Ibid. p. 238. See SQUILLERY. 

Saxilby, Mrs., 11. 

Probably the Elizabeth Saxby 
who received 51. as part of her 
salary in the 1st Hen. VIII. 
Additional MS. in the British 
Museum, 7100. 

Say, Mrs. Ann, 34, 38, 48, 52. 
One of the queen's gentlewomen. 
Her board, whilst ill at Wood- 
stock, cost Is. 4d. a week. A 
William Say, Esquire, was usher 
of the chamber to Henry VI. in 
1450. Rot. Part. v. 191 b. 

Sayeing, gift to a man " sayeing 
himself to lodge in his house 
the Earl Rivers," 78. 
" Saying," in this sense, appears 
to mean incurring danger or in- 
convenience ; and this person was 
rewarded for affording shelter to 
the Earl Rivers, the queen's 
uncle, in the time of his distress, 
and when it was treason to pro- 
tect him. The word seems to be 
the same as " assaying," which, 
in one sense, imports trial by 
danger or distress ; difficulty, 
hardship. Todd's Johnson. Mr. 
Gage, however, suggests that 
" saying" merely meant that this 
person said he had lodged the 
Earl Rivers. 

School hire, for, 76, 105. 

Eightpence a quarter was the sum 
paid for the school hire of a young 
favourite of the Queen's. See 
PALLET. 

Schoolmaster, the Prince's, 28. 
See PRINCE. 

Scots, the Queen of, 10, 19, 22, 
23, 29, 34, 38, 86, 89, 93. 
Margaret, the queen's eldest 
daughter. She was born No- 
vember 29, 1489, and in 1502, 
being then fourteen, was affi- 
anced to James IV., King of Scot- 
land, and married him in the fol- 
lowing year, after whose death at 
Flodden Field, she remarried in 
1514, Archibald Douglas, Earl of 
Angus. On the death of Queen 
Elizabeth, her great-grandson 
became King of England in her 
right. 



Seal, a, brought, 2. 

Searing, candles for the altar 
clothes, 83. 

Seler of beds and cloths of es- 
tate, 65, 66. 

Palsgrave translates " Sellar of a 
bedde" ciel, which Cotgrave ex- 
plains to be " a canopy for the 
testerns and valances of a bed, 
also the canopy that is carried 
over a prince as he walks in state." 
Lady Hastings, in 1503, bequeath- 
ed to her nephew " a fedur bedde, 
aboulster, a blanket, a chike hap- 
ping, an old counterpoint, sillor 
and testor." Among the effects 
of Sir John Fastolf, temp. Henry 
VI., in one of the sleeping apart- 
ments were " j purpeynt of white 
j seloure and j testoure" on which 
word the editor of that inventory 
has remarked " Seloure or seler is 
probably the head of a bed. Ce- 
lura is rendered by Du Cange 
' lecti supremum tegmen, Lat. 
Ccelum, Gall. Ciel de Lit.' " Ar- 
chaologia, xxi., 262. That celour 
or seler also meant a canopy is 
manifest from the account of the 
coronation of Henry VIII., in 
the College of Arms, and printed 
as part of the evidence of Colonel 
Berkeley's claim to the barony 
of Berkeley. " Canapy to be 
borne over the King. The Kyng 
shall ryde opin heckled under a 
scale of cloth of gold," &c. p. 219. 
" The cele or canapi borne over 
the quene." p. 220. " The scale 
or canapy."_p. 222. 

Sergeants at law, 101. 

Severn, for conveying the Queen 
over the, 43. 

Seymour, Sir John, 67, 81. 

Father of the Protector Somerset, 
and of Queen Jane Seymour. 
He was knighted for his services 
at the battle of Blackheath in 
1497; in 1507 was sheriff of 
Wiltshire; and was made a knight 
banneret in 1513 for his gallantry 
at Therouenne and Tournay. 
He died 21st December, 1536, 
aged sixty. Collins' Peerage, ed. 
1779, vol. i., p. 143. 

Shadde, William, 10, 54, 64. 
Neither of these entries afford 



222 



INDEX A.ND NOTES. 



any information as to who this 
person was. 

Shalmewes, the, 91. 

Players on the Shalms, i.e., the 
base cornet. A note with an en- 
graving of a shalm is given in 
the Privy Purse Expenses of 
Henry Fill., p. 351, and in the 
Northumberland Household Book, 
where the following entry occurs: 
" My Lord useth and accustometh 
yerly when his Lordship is at 
home to gyf to iij of the Kyng's 
Shames when they com to my 
Lord yerly, xs." 

Shanks, fur and tavelyns of, 89. 
See a note in the index to the 
Wardrobe Accounts of Edward 
IF. 

Shaw, Sir John, 52. 

A goldsmith and Mayor of Lon- 
don in 1501. He was the son of 
John Shaa of Rochford and Essex, 
and was knighted on the field by 
Henry VII. His name often oc- 
curs in the Privy Purse Expenses 
of Henry VII., as having sold 
the King plate, and as being 
paid once 4/., and another time 
31. 3s., for a George of the Order 
of the Garter. He appears to 
have been one of the executors of 
Sir Reginald Bray, K.G., in Au- 
gust, 1503. 

Sheets, for making 1 , 22. 

for various kinds of, 81. 

Shepherd, to a Disar that played 
the, 53. 

It has been suggested under 
" Disar," that this en 117 is of a 
payment to a man who acted the 
part of the shepheard in some his- 
trionic performance. What the 
piece was of which the shepherd 
was the prominent part, cannot 
perhaps be decidedly ascertained ; 
but it may be conjectured that 
it was the Adoration of the 
Shepheards, which was often 
embroidered on arras and tapes- 
try. In the account of the ef- 
fects of Sir John Fastolf, under 
" Clothes of Arras and of Tapstre 
warke," is " Imprimis, j clothe 
of Arras, clyped the Schipherd's 



clothe ;" and in the " Magna 
Camera ultra aulam Estevalem, 
j clothe of Arras of the Schip- 
herds," which Mr. Douce con- 
siders to have been a description 
[query representation] of the 
adoration of the Shepherds. 
Archceologia, xxi., 257, 262. 

Shire Thursday 1, 4. 

Or Maunday Thursday. See 
MAUNDAY. The etymology of 
Shire Thursday is thus explained 
in the " Festival" printed by 
Wynkyn de Worde in 1511, 
f. xxx, p. 2, and f. xxxi. 
" Yf a man aske why S/iere 
Thursday is called so, ye may 
saye that in Holy Churche it is 
called (Cena Domini) our Lordes 
Souper daye ; for that day he 
souped with his Discyples openly; 
and after souper he gave them his 
flesshe and his blode to etc and 
drynke. It is also in Englysshe 
called Sher Thursdaye, for in olde 
faders dayes the people wold that 
daye shere there theyr heedes, and 
clyppe theyr berdes, and poll theyr 
heedes, and so make them honest 
ayenst Ester Day." A corre- 
spondence on the word will be 
found in the Gentleman's Maga- 
zine, vol. xlix. 

Shirts, for, 17, 76, 81, 105. 

Shoes, for, 26, 38, 61, 75, 76, 
85, 86, 98, 105. 

Shrines, various, noticed, 3. 

Shurley, Thomas, 4, 23. 

Yeoman of the Queen's Cham- 
ber ; his wages were Is. a day. 

Sickness, offerings made by the 
Queen during- her, 37. 
Made to induce the saints to in- 
tercede for her recovery. 

Signet, Office of the, 100. 
Silks, for, 5, 19, 27, 55, 67, 75, 

92. 

Sion, Abbess of, 13, 89. 
Skeling, Alice, 99. 

One of the Queen's attendants. 
Skinner, Heyward, 100. 
Skinners, to, 88, 97. 
Sleeves, for making-, 23, 93. 

" Sleeves belonging to coats and 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



223 



gowns were so contrived that they 
might be either affixed to, or se- 
parated from, them, as occasion 
required ; they were commonly 
made of different materials, and 
were frequently superbly orna- 
mented. The following articles 
are selected from an account of 
the apparel left in the wardrobes 
of Henry VIII., after his de- 
cease : ' A pair of truncke sleeves 
of redde cloth of gold with cut 
works, having twelve pair of ag- 
lets of gold," and these sleeves 
were welted with black velvet. 
A pair of French sleeves of 
green velvet richly embroidered 
with flowers of damask gold, pirl 
of Morisco work with knops of 
Venice gold, cordian raised, either 
sleeve having six small buttons 
of gold and in every button a 
pearl and the branches of the 
flowers set with pearles.' The 
sleeves are also said, in some in- 
stances, to have had^cuffs to them, 
and in others, to have been ruffed, 
that is, ornamented with ruffs or 
ruffles, at the hands." Strutt's 
Dress and Habits, ii. 360, 3?5. 

Sleeves belonging to gowns, 34, 
35. 

" Sleeve of a gown or any other 
garment" is translated by Pals- 
grave by the word manche, which 
is an ancient heraldic bearing. 
By statute 17 Edward IV., it was 
ordained that it should be lawful 
for the wives and unmarried 
daughters of persons worth 201, a 
year or upwards, to " use and 
were in their colers, ventes, and 
slefes of their gownes and hukes 
sarcenet or tarteron." Rot. Parl. 
vi. 189. 

Smith, Henry, 31. 

Clerk of Windsor Castle. 

Smocks, for, 34. 

Smyth, Richard, yeoman of the 
Queen's robes, 18, 50, 74, 75, 
105. 

, bailiff of Swalow- 

feld, 108. 

A William Smyth was page of 
the robes in the llth Henry VII. 

Soap, for, 75. 



Socks, for fustian and cloth for 
making, 16, 61, 66. 

" Socke for ones foot, chausson" 
occurs in Palsgrave. A pair for 
the feet cost 2rf., whilst a pair of 
hosen came to lOd. The cloth 
and making of one pair for the 
Queen cost 3s. 6d. 

Somerset, revenues of the county 
of, 107. 

Southwark, the fraternity of St. 
George in, 7. 

Spain, Lady of, a letter given to, 
69. 

to a maid of, that danced 

before the Queen, 89. 

the Prothonotary of, 4. 

Spaniard, to a, 43. 

All the persons here mentioned 
probably came to this country in 
consequence of Prince Arthur's 
marriage with Katherine of Ar- 
ragon. In the Privy Purse Ex- 
penses of Henry VII. is an entry 
of two pounds being given " to a 
Spaniard that tumbled." 

Spangles, for, 21. 

The entry where this word occurs 
explains its meaning. See also 
SPANGLES, in the index to the 
Wardrobe Accounts of Edward IV. 

Spaniels, for their food, 94. 
Spynell, Anthony, 61. 

A goldsmith, and apparently a 

foreigner. 

Squillery, to the, 2. 

Query, Scullery, the duties of 
which are sufficiently obvious. In 
the Household of George, Duke of 
Clarence, in 1468, were " In the 
squillery and salserie a yeoman a 
groom and a page." It was the 
duty of the sergeant of the squil- 
lery, in the 17th Henry VIII., 
" to see his vessels, as well silver 
as pewter, to be well and truly 
kept and saved from losses and 
stealing." He was also sergeant 
of the woodyard. 
Stable, the expenses of the 

Queen's, 18, 30, 45, 62, 93, 

97, 104. 

Independently of the two entries 
where the amount has been obli- 



224 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



terated, the whole sum paid for 
the expenses of the Queen's stable 
was 3732. 17s. 

Stable, to the officers and keep- 
era of the Queen's, with a buck 
in reward, 38. 

Stations, 6. 

" Privileged altars, where, with 
proper dispositions, indulgences 
might be obtained under bulls 
from the Holy See. Thus St. 
Peter's and the other Basilicks at 
Koine have privileged altars to 
which the devotion of individuals 
frequently leads them, and the 
visiting of which is often made 
one of the conditions for obtain, 
ing the indulgence of the jubilee ; 
when the faithful are said to 
make the stations. It appears 
that the Queen offered at certain 
places, which were called ' her 
stations,' one of which seems to 
have been the high altar of Rich- 
mond, and others were probably 
some of the shrines noticed in 
these accounts. The Queen may 
have made her stations in fulfil- 
ment of some vow, or in satis- 
faction of a canonical penance. 
Besides the privileged altars in 
churches, it must be observed, 
that it is not uncommon to find 
standing together in the open air, 
as in the Coliseum at Rome, on 
mountains, and in other places, 
certain privileged altars or ora- 
torios corresponding with the 
number of stations of the Passion, 
a practice of private devotion ; 
and in this sense is to be under- 
stood the passage from Chaucer 
' Yet I have been at Rome also, 
And gone the statyons all a 
row." ' G. 

Stafford, Lady Elizabeth, 41, 
80, 99. 

One of the Queen's gentlewomen, 
who had the comparatively high 
salary of 33Z. 6s. 8d. She was 
possibly the Queen's first cousin, 
namely, the daughter of Henry, 
Duke of Buckingham, by Kathe- 
rine, daughter of Earl Rivers. 
She married Robert Ratcliffe, 
Lord Fitz Walter aud Earl of 
Sussex. 



Stafford, Mrs., 14, 39. 

William, 12, 14. 

Both these persons were servants 
of the Queen, and were probably 
husband and wife. 

Standers, 25. 

Apparently iron uprights used in 
building. 

Standard, key of the great, 68. 
A large chest generally used for 
carrying plate, jewels, or other 
valuable articles. The word oc- 
curs in this sense in the Privy 
Purse Expenses of Henry VIII. 
The clerks of the Earl of Northum- 
berland' s foreign expenses of the 
works of the kitchin, &c., were 
allowed at every removal " a gret 
standert chist for carying of there 
Bookes." Northumberland House- 
hold Book, p. 389. Among the 
effects in Sir Thomas Kytson's 
wardrobe, was " one great stand- 
ard, with locke and keye bound 
with iron." History of Hengrave^ 
p. 34. John Cornwallis, Esq., 
speaks in his will, in 1506," of all 
the brewyng vessells and stand, 
ards in the brewhouse and bake- 
house." In the last instance the 
word is used for tresil, stand, or 
stadle. 

Staples, for, 20, 25. 

Stars, for, 21. 

Ornaments for the jackets of per- 
sons who were to perform in the 
" disguising." 

Staunton, John, 47, 51. 

groom of the 

Queen's chamber, 36, 41. 

the elder, 21. 

23, 24, 53, 100. 

the younger, 77. 

Possibly the son of the above- 
named. All these entries pro- 
bably relate to the same person. 

Stebenhithe, 9. 

The Duchess of Suffolk, the 
Queen's aunt, appears, from this 
entry, to have resided at Stepney. 

Stirrups, for, 104. 

Stokeclare, Our Lady of, 3. 

Stoks, Margaret, 82. 
An embroiderer. 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



Stole, carriage of the Queen's, 
45. 

The stole, in this sense, was a 
kind of packing chest for robes 
and clothes. " The King's cham- 
berlain to assign for the ij 
garderobes and the King's cham- 
bre for the male and s/oo/e, and 
other stuff needful, to the some 
of xii or xvj sompter horses." 
" The Stoole is here kept," i.e., in 
the office of the Wardrobe. See 
the Regulations of the royal 
household, temp. Henry VII., 
pp. 40, 41, whence " Groom of 
the Stole." 

sheets for the, 81. 

"Sheets for the stool" were pro- 
bably sheets laid to wrap clothes 
in. 

Stools, for fetching and making 
the Queen's, 7, bis 16. 
Four of these stools were " work- 
ing stooles ;" another was covered 
with scarlet ; and the carriage of 
one from London to Langley cost 
14d. It seems that they were 
used for sitting on, rather than for 
the feet. 

Stourton, fee farm of, 109. 

Stormy, John, of Chertsey, 17. 

Straight-white, for five yards of, 
104. 

Cloth called " straights" is fre- 
quently mentioned on the rolls of 
parliament. 

Strakes, for placing on the close 
car, 34. 

" The strakes or streaks of a 
wheel are the iron plates that shoe 
the fellows of a wheel or be nailed 
round the circumference of it." 
Kennett's Glossary. 

Stratfeld Mortimer, 106. 
See MORTIMER. 

Stuff, for conveying, 5, 39, 50, 
68, 74, 79. 
Goods of various kinds. 

Sudbury, Our Lady of, 3. 

Suffolk, Duchess of, 9, 86, 88. 
Elizabeth Plantagenet, second 
daughter of Richard, Duke of 
York, and sister of King Edward 
IV., then widow of John de la 
Pole, Duke of Suffolk, K.G., who 



died in 1491. By him she had 
issue John, who was created Earl 
of Lincoln vita patris, and was 
declared heir to the throne by 
Richard III., in the event of the 
death of his own son, and died 
. p. 1487, Edmund, who will be 
again noticed ; Humphrey and 
Edward, priests ; Richard, who 
assumed the title of Duke of 
Suffolk, was called the " White 
Rose," and was killed at Pavia in 
1525, s, p. ; Katherine, who is 
said to have married William, 
Lord Stourton, but who is pro- 
bably confounded with the Ka- 
therine Stourton hereafter men- 
tioned ; Ann, a nun, at Sion ; 
Dorothy, who died unmarried ; 
and Elizabeth, who married 
Henry, Lord Morley, and died 
*. p. Glover notices likewise a 
son William, who married Ka- 
therine, daughter of William, 
Lord Stourton, and widow of 
William, Lord Grey. Harl. MSS. 
807, P- xi- The duchess is stated, 
in Frost's Notices of Hutl, to have 
died on the 16th November, 16 
Henry VII., 1500; but there can 
be little doubt, from the entry in 
p. 88, of a buck having been then 
given her, that she was living in 
January 1503. It is evident from 
these accounts that she was 
treated with much attention by 
her niece, the Queen. Though 
the mother of nine children, her 
descendants became extinct in the 
third generation. 

Suffolk, Duchess of, receipts of 

her lands, 111. 
Edmond de la Pole, 

Earl of, 5. 

Second son of John, Duke of 
Suffolk, by Elizabeth Plantagenet 
above mentioned. His brother 
John, Earl of Lincoln, dying in 
1487, Edmund became heir to his 
father on his death in 1491 ; but 
he was prevented from inheriting 
the honours of his family in conse- 
quence of his brother's attainder. 
He was styled, apparently by 
courtesy only, " Earl of Suffolk ;" 
and from his imprudent temper, 
frequently incurred the King's 
displeasure, to whom his birth 
2 G 



226 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



rendered him an object of jea- 
lousy. Having killed a mean 
person, he was indicted for the 
crime in 1501, and, though par- 
doned by Henry, he was placed at 
the bar of the King's Bench, and 
formally arraigned, which so of- 
fended his pride, probably because 
he deemed that he ought to have 
been tried by his peers, that he 
quitted the realm without the 
King's leave, and went to his 
aunt the Duchess of Burgundy. 
Notwithstanding his conduct, he 
contrived to make his peace 
with Henry, and returned to 
England ; but soon after Prince 
Arthur's marriage, he went 
again to Flanders, for which he 
was solemnly accursed at Paul's 
Cross, by a Bull, in October 
1502, and was attainted in 1503. 
It was on this occasion that his 
wife was placed under the care 
of the Duchess of Norfolk. 
After remaining in exile for 
some years, he was at length 
brought to England, and was 
beheaded on Tower Hill for 
treason, on the 5th April, 5 
Henry VIII., 1513. He married, 
according to Dugdale, Sandford, 
and other authorities, Margaret, 
daughter of Richard Lord Scrope, 
but she was., in fact, the daughter 
and coheir of Sir Richard Scrope, 
second son of Henry Lord Scrope, 
of Bolton, by Elizabeth, daughter 
of John Lord Scrope, of Upsal. 
By her, whose will was proved in 
May 1515, he had a daughter, 
Ann, who took the veil in the 
Minories about March 1511. Ad- 
ditional MS. in the British Mu- 
seum, 7100. Sandford's Genea- 
logical History. Hall's Chronicle. 
Rot. Parl., vi., 545. Testamenla 
Fetusta, p. 530. 
Sukcads, brought, 43. 

A kind of sweetmeat. In. the 
account of the feast at the instal- 
lation of Archbishop Warham in 
1466, is " jely ipocras, tench flo- 
ryshed, lampray pistr', quince and 
orange pistr', tart melior, leche 
florentine, marmalade succade, 
comfettes, wafers," the two last 
with ipocras. Leland's Collecta- 
nea, vi. 28. Socado, or sucado, 



which was the same article, is 
twice mentioned as having been 
brought to Henry VIII. Privy 
Purse Expenses, pp. 184, 224, once 
" In reward for bringing ij barells 
ofsocado and cakes to the king's 
grace :" " In reward for bring- 
ing sucado and marmalado to the 
King's grace at Eltham." 

Surgeon's bills, 14, 70, 105. 
Surveying the Queen's land, for, 

101. 

Swallowfieldpark, 18, 108, 111. 
. the under keeper 

of, 30. 

Tables, money given the Queen 
at, 43. 

The old name for backgammon. 
See a note in the Privy Purse Ex- 
penses of Henry nil., p. 356. 

Talbot, Sir Gilbert, 64. 

Apparently Sir Gilbert Talbot, 
of Grafton, K.G., ancestor of the 
Earls of Shrewsbury of that name. 
He was a privy councillor to 
Henry VII., from whom he re- 
ceived numerous favours, and 
whom he served with ability and 
zeal ; and died in September 1516. 

Tallowing. 
See BARGE. 

Tame, Edmund, 108. 

Receiver of the revenue of the 
Queen's lands in Gloucestershire 
and Wilts. " Afterwards Sir Ed- 
mund. He was the son of John 
Tame, an opulent merchant of 
London, who purchased the 
manor of Fairford in Gloucester- 
shire, and built there a beautiful 
church, which still remains in 
nearly a perfect state, with the 
finest stained glass in all its win- 
dows. Following his father's ex- 
ample, Sir Edmund Tame built a 
church at Readcombe, an adjoin- 
ing village. See Leland's Itine- 
rary." D. 

Tapetts, 14. 

In this sense, cloths for the 
sumpter horses ; but tapetts also 
meant tapestry. See Tapets in 
the Index to the Wardrobe Ac- 
counts of Edward IV. 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



Tavelyns of Shanks, 89. 

See the Index to the Wardrobe 
Accounts of Edward If. 

Tavern, money given the mi- 
nisters of the King's Chapel 
to drink at a, 23. 

Taylor's bill, 40. 

Temple Bar, 86. 

Thornbury in Gloucestershire, to 
the church of, 43. 

Thread for, 65, 66, 83, 91. 

Throckmorton, Christopher,Esq. 
110. 

Tippetts, sarcenet for the Queen's, 
54. 

" The tippet appears to have been 
a part of dress something resem- 
bling the partelet, and worn about 
the neck. It varied in size and 
form ; for it was sometimes large 
and long like a mantle, at other 
times, it was narrow and scarcely 
covered the top of the shoulders. 
Like the partelet, it was used by 
men as well as by women." Strutt's 
Dresses and Habits, ii., p. 368. 
" The partelet," to which Strutt 
compares the tippet, " answered 
the purpose," he says, " of the 
gorget which he describes on the 
authority of John de Reun, a 
French poet of the thirteenth 
century, as an article which was 
wrapped two or three times round 
the neck, and then fastened with 
a great quantity of pins, which 
raised it on either side of the 
face so as to resemble two horns, 
whilst it was so closely attached 
to the chin as to look as if it was 
nailed to it." " The partelets," 
he continues, " came into fashion 
towards the fifteenth century, and 
were common to both sexes. Those 
belonging to women were made 
of various stuffs of the most 
valuable and delicate kind. Some- 
times they are described as being 
without sleeves, whence it may 
be inferred that they sometimes 
had them." " The tippet worn 
by ladies at the time of mourn- 
ing, was quite another thing : it 
was a long narrow stripe of cloth 
attached to the hood or to the 
sleeves of the wearer." Ibid., 



pp. 167, 368. Tippets were like- 
wise worn round the head. 
" With his tipet ybounde about 

his tied, 
And she came after in a gite of 

red." Reve's Tale, 1. 3951. 
which agrees with the following 
ordinance which is cited by Strutt, 
p. 323. 

" Be it remembered that none 
may weare hoodes, under the de- 
gree of au esquire of the King's 
household, but only tippets of a 
quarter of a yard in breadth, ex- 
cept in time of need, and then 
they may wear hoodes." Occleve, 
in his censure on the dress of his 
times, and of the " foule waste of 
cloth," says that a yard of broad 
cloth was expended in one man's 
tippet. Ibid., p. 254. A part of 
the costume of a priest was also 
called a tippet ; Palsgrave trans- 
lates " Typpet for a preest" by 
" cornette," and William Water, 
vicar of New Church, mentions 
in his will in 1508, his " velvet 
tippet." In De Moleon's " Voy- 
ages Liturgiques," a canon of St. 
John's, of Lyons, is represented 
habited in his fur tippet. PI. iv. 

Tithes, for, 25. 

Tourney, a bed of a, 39. 

Query, a bed on which was worked 
the representation of a " tour- 
ney" or tournament. 

Tower, the, 8, 10, 11, 15, 16, 
17,36,78,80,85,87,91,93, 

95, 96, 97, 98. 

It appears that the Queen was at 
the Tower from the 27th April 
to the 2nd May 1502 ; that she 
arrived there on the 12th Decem- 
ber in that year, and remained 
until her accouchement, soon after 
which she died there. 

Transoms, for, 25. 

Travice, or Travers, Laurence, 
63, 79, 100. 

This person, whose name is thus 
variously written, was apparently 
in attendance on the young Cour- 
tenays, the Queen's nephews 
and niece. 

Trende, William, 96. 

One of the royal servants. 
2 G 2 



228 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



Tripe, brought, 64. 

Troye, 44, 47. 

Troy Mitchel, or Mitchel Troy, 
about three miles south-west of 
Monmouth, which place the 
Queen visited during her pro- 
gress into Wales in September 
1503. 

Trumpeters, coats of white and 
green sarcenet for the, 78. 
These dresses, the colours of 
which, white and green, were the 
King's livery, seem to have been 
made for the trumpeters to wear 
at the " disguising" in the pre- 
ceding year. 

Trussing bed, for making a, 65. 
Trussing beds were beds used in 
travelling, when it was the custom 
for persons of consequence to carry 
their beds with them. Palsgrave 
translates " Trussyng bedde" by 
"lit de champ," i.e., field bed. 
John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancas- 
ter, gave, by his will, dated in 
February 1397) to his Duchess, 
" mes lits faites pur mon corps, 
appelles en Engleterre, trussyng 
beddes." Nichols' Royal Wills, 
p. 155. In the list of horses kept 
by the Earl of Northumberland 
were, " A horsse for my lordes 
eloth-sak with his bedde," and 
" a hors for the grome of the 
stable to ryde upon that ledes the 
eloth-sek horsse that caryeth my 
lords trussynge bed and all thyngs 
belongynge yt when he rydes his 
hors." Northumberland House- 
hold Book, pp. 55, 120, 358, 359. 
Dr. Percy conjectures that a 
trussing bed could be trussed or 
packed in a cloth-sek or portman- 
teau. " To truss," means to 
pack close. A pair of trussing 
coffers were sent to the King of 
Scotland in 1430. Foedera, x. 470; 
and the same articles, as well as 
" cotton to trusse plate," are 
mentioned in the Privy Purse 
Expenses of Henry fill., pp. 49, 
190. In the " Form of Making 
the King's Bed," temp. Henry 
VIII., to trusse seems to be used 
synonymously " to tuck in." 
" The first sheete to be layed and 
then to trusse in both sheete and 
fustyan rounde about the bedde 



of downe," " to trusse the endes 
of the said sheete under every 
end of the bolster." Archceologia, 
iv., 313. A remarkable instance 
of the use of the word trussing 
will be found in the Wardrobe 
Accounts of Edward IV. 

Twycrosse, Leonard, 49. 

A servant. 
Tyler, William, desar, 87. 

See DESAR. 

Usher, the King's gentleman, 
91, 92. 

John Whiting. 
Undrewood, Dr., 59. 

The Queen's Confessor. Pro- 
bably Edmund Underwood, who 
resigned the prebendary of Sneat- 
ing in St. Paul's, before the 28th 
June, 1518. Bliss's Wood's Fasti 
O-jonienses, i., 78. 

Utton, Dr., 83. 

Valance of a cloth of estate, 66. 

Vandelf, John, 66, 88. 
A goldsmith. 

Velvet, for, 10, 17, 19, 22, 64, 
65, 75. 

Velvet appears then to have been 
from 10s. to 10s. 6d. a yard. 

Venice, gold and silk of, 8. 
See GOLD. 

Verney, Sir Ralph, 63. 

Probably the Sir Ralph Verney 
who was sheriff of Bedford and 
Bucks in the third, sixteenth, 
and thirty-secondof Henry VIII., 
and ancestor of the Earls Verney, 
&c., in Ireland. 

, Eleanor, Lady, 8, 30, 

36, 39, 43,55, 57,84,91, 99. 
One of the Queen's gentlewomen. 
Her salary was 20 /i. per annum. 
It is probable that this lady was 
Eleanor, daughter and heir of 
John Loutham of Northampton, 
and widow of Sir Richard Ver- 
ney, of Compton Murdock and 
Warwick, Knight, who died in 
1490, ancestor of the Lords Wil- 
loughby de Broke. If this con- 
jecture be correct, she must have 
been then aged. 

Venison brought, 45. 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



229 



Venison, carriage of, 59. 

Vysys, two quartered boards 
with, 74. 

Apparently, vices or screws. Sir 
William Bruges, Garter King of 
Arras, bequeathed by his will in 
1449, to the church of St. George, 
of Stamford, " a tabernacle well 
ywrought of sylver and over gilt 
of the wight of one marc or 
thereabouts goying with a bill to 
be set high upon the coupe : and 
above upon the point of the seyd 
tabernacle, a litel cross of silver 
and over gilt, goyng also by a 
vyce." 

Vineyard, the, 44. 

One of the country seats of the 
Abbots of Gloucester, one mile 
distant from that city, near the 
road which leads to Flaxley in the 
forest of Dean. D. 

VVafry, to the, 90. 

The Waferywas, and still is, one 
of the offices of the royal house- 
hold ; an account of it will be 
found in the Liber Niger Ed- 
ward IV., printed in the Collec- 
tion of Regulations of the Royal 
Household. 

Wages of the Queen's servants, 
99, 100. 

On the 13th April, 1503, about 
two months after the Queen's 
death, the following entries occur 
in the Privy Purse Expenses of 
Henry VII. 

" For the wages of the Queen's 
ladys and gentlewomen, 68/. 
For the wages of the servants of 
her staple, 47/- 12*. 4rf." 
It appears from the same accounts 
and those of the 1st Henry VIII., 
that the salaries of some of her 
ladies continued to be paid long 
after her decease. 

of various persons, 82. 

Wakefeld, Robert, bailitf of Odi- 

ham, 107. 

Wales, shoes, &c., bought on the 
Queen's going into, 85, 86. 

when the Queen returned 

from, 92. 

The Queen commenced her pro- 
gress into Wales in August 1502, 



and crossed the Severn on her 
return on the 28th of that 
month. 

Walker, John, 4. 
Yeoman Almoner. 

Waller, John, 86. 

His servant was rewarded for 
bringing a goshawk to the Queen. 

Walsingham, our Lady of, 3. 
The famous image of the Vir- 
gin Mary, which was preserved 
in the Priory of Black Canons at 
Walsingham in Norfolk, was ce- 
lebrated all over Europe for the 
great resort of pilgrims, and the 
rich offerings made to it. 

Walston, 49. 

Woolaston, in the hundred of 
Westbury, in Gloucestershire. 

Waltier, Lewis, 6, 15, 24, 60, 
73, 85, 94, 95. 
Master of the Queen's barge. 
His wages were Wcl. per diem, 
and to him the wages of the 
rowers and other expenses of con- 
veying the Queen and her suite 
by water, and of repairing the 
barge, &c., were paid. See 
BARGE. 

Wapping Mill, men hung at, 14. 
Ward, Simon, 97. 

Lorimer of London. 
Wardemole, for dyeing, 81. 

" Waddemole, now called Woad- 
mel, and in Oxfordshire, Wodne- 
nell, a coarse sort of stuff used 
for the covering of the collars of 
cart horses. Ray, in his Collec- 
tion of East and South Country 
Words, describes it to be a hairy, 
coarse stuff, made of Island wool, 
[query Iceland], and brought 
thence by our seamen to Norfolk 
and Suffolk. Perhaps from the 
Saxon Veob, grass, hay, weed, 
and Mele, any hollow continent, 
as if a collar stuffed with straw 
or hay ; or possibly from the Island 
Vaijtur, a rope, or any wod of 
coarse hemp, and Mel, to beat or 
mall, ' Et in quinque virgatis de 
Waddemole emptis pro coleris 
equinis hoc anno, ij sol j denar.' " 
Kennett's Glossary. It is evi- 
dent that Wardemole was a kind 
of coarse cloth, and in this sense 
the word is frequently used by 



230 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



Sir Walter Scott in the " Monas- 
tery ;" and in the supplement to 
Dr. Jamieson's Dictionary of the 
Scottish Language, no other au- 
thority is cited for the word, 
which is there said to mean " a 
coarse cloth made in the Ork. 
neys," than that delightful ro- 
mance. 
Wardens, brought, 6. 

Large pears. See a note on this 
word in the Privy Purse Expenses 
of Henry Fill., p. 360. 

Wardrobe of the Queen's beds, 
53, 54. 

Warreyn, John, 65. 
A bed maker. 

Warwick, 69. 

Watch, King's, to the, 90. 

The King's watch consisted, it is 
presumed, of the twenty-four 
yeomen of the crown ; and it was 
the duty of the Wait to " pipe the 
watch" four times during the 
night, from Michaelmas to Shire 
Thursday, and in summer three 
times. Regulations of the Royal 
Household^ temp. Henry VII., 
pp. 38, 48. 

Water, for heating, 4. 

Watermen, wages of, 6, 15, 24, 
60, 75,94, 96. 
See BARGE and WALTIERS. 

Wax, for, 16, 17, 56, 103. 

White wax was \Qd. a pound, 
being double the price of yellow 
wax. 

Wayne, i. e., Wain, paid for 
bringing one which had broken 
down, 46. 

Wedding clothes, for the pur- 
chase of, 4. 

gown for a, 49. 

Sixteen shillings were given to an 
apothecary " towards his wed- 
ding gown," and forty shillings 
to the page of the Queen's beds 
" towards the buying of his wed- 
ding clothing." The custom of 
presenting favourites and depen- 
dants with their wedding clothes 
was very common, and instances 
of it will be found in the Ward- 
robe Accounts of Edward IV. 

Weredon, John, 49. 

One of the Queen's servants. 



Westminster, 19, 2 J, 22, 24, 32, 
34, 35, 56, 70, 87, 95, 98. 

The* Queen was at Westminster 
on the 6th and 12th June, 1502, 
and apparently rested there for a 
day before she proceeded to the 
Tower for her last confinement. 

Abbot of, 32. 

John Islip, who succeeded in 
1498, and died 2nd January 1516. 
" The rebus of this abbot, a boy 
*/j/>ping"from a tree, i.e., / */i/>, 
with the initials of his name, oc- 
curs in painted glass in the 
Deanery at Westminster." G. 

St. Margaret's of, 97. 

Weston, Mrs. Anne, 23, 99. 

One of the Queen's gentle- 
women. 

Richard, 84. 

A servant of the Queen's. Pro- 
bably the father of the Sir Francis 
Weston, K.B., who was sup- 
posed to hare had an intrigue 
with Anne Boleyn, and suffered 
death in consequence. 

Whiting, John, 91,92. 

Gentleman usher of the King's 
chamber. 

Whitstones, Owen, a messenger, 
100. 

Wicker bottles, 84. 

Wild boar, a, brought, 64. 

Willesdon, Our Lady of, 4, 96. 

Willeston, Woolaston in Mon- 
mouthshire, 43, 46. 
The Queen was there on the 28th 
August 1503. 

Williams, Sir John, 30. 

Alice, 100. 

One. of the rockers of the young 
Lord Edward Courtenay. 
John, 9. 



One of the Queen's servants. 
Winchester, Bishop of, 90. 

Richard Fox, who was translated 
from Durham 17th October 1500, 
was Lord Privy Seal, and died 
14th September 1528. 

Windsor, 23, 25, 27, 28, 29, 30, 
32, 35, 36, 38, 40, 42, 46, 49, 

50, 58, 59, 64, 72, 74, 88. 
The Queen was at Windsor in 
June and early in July, 1502, 
whence she went to Woodstock ; 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



231 



and appears to have stopped there 
on her return from her progress 
into Wales. 

Windsor Park, an arbour made 
in, 31. 

clerk of the castle of, 

31. 

the keeper of the 

little garden at, 7. 

to Our Lady, and St. 



George, and the holy cross 
at, 3, 29. 

to the children of the 

college of, 31. 

Richard, then de- 
ceased, 102. 

One of the Queen's servants. 
Wine, Rhenish, brought and 
purchased, 48, 52, 84, 91. 

sent for, 46. 

A note on the wines used in 
England early in the sixteenth 
century will be found in the 
Privy Purse Expenses of Henry 
VIIL, p. 363. 
Wise, Ralph, 26. 

This person lived at Greenwich, 
and had the Queen's fool under 
his care during his illness. 
Wolpitts, Our Lady of, 3. 
Women, alms to thirty-seven 
poor in almasse on Shire 
Thursday, 1. 

See MAUNDAY. 
Woodcocks, brought, 53. 
Woodnote, Thomas, 28, 33, 40, 
44, 59, 60, 86, 88, 98. 
Groom of the Queen's chamber. 
To him and John Felde, another 
of the grooms of her Majesty's 
chamber, was entrusted the care 
of her jewels on her removal from 
one place to another. 
Woodstock, 33, 34, 35, 37, 38, 
40, 41, 47, 48, 50, 74, 108. 
Her Majesty was at Woodstock 
on the 20th July, and was there 
visited with a fit of illness. 
Worcester, to Our Lady of, 3. 
Worsted, for, 91, 104. 
Worsted yarn, 14. 



Worthy, William, alias Phip, 5, 
26, 61. 

The Queen's fool was boarded by 
him ; and for whom he sometimes 
purchased clothes. 

Worthy Mortimer, 107. 
See MORTIMER. 

Wotton, Mrs. Margaret, 99. 
One of the Queen's gentlewomen, 
whose salary was <U. per annum. 

Wurley, Henry, 64, 98. 
A goldsmith of London. 

Wybern, Nicholas, 12. 

One of the Queen's servants. 

Wycombe, 36, 40, 

In Buckinghamshire, through 
which the Queen passed, and 
where she seems to have rested 
on the 3rd August, 1502. 

Wyndeslowe, Henry, to the 
daughters of, 21. 
On the 2nd January 1497, 31- 6*. 
8d. were paid by the King for 
" cristening of Winslow's child ;" 
one of the daughters of that per- 
son here spoken of was probably 
the King's god-daughter. 

Wyrdon, John, 29, 105. 

One of the Queen's servants. 

Yone, Margaret, 55. 

This person belonged to the 
Queen's household. 

York, minstrels of the Duke of, 
78. 

Henry, the Queen's second son, 
afterwards King Henry VIII. 

Archbishop of, 90. 

Thomas Savage, who was trans- 
lated from London in April 1501, 
and died 2nd September 1507- 

fool of my Lord of, 2. 

It is not certain whether the 
duke or the archbishop of York is 
here alluded to, probably the 
former. 

Zouch, Mrs., 23. 

As the entry in which the name 
of this lady occurs is a payment 
by the Queen for lining her 
gown, she was probably one of 
her Majesty's attendants, though 
her name does not occur in the 
list in p. 99. 



INDEX AND NOTES 



WARDROBE ACCOUNTS 



KING EDWARD THE FOURTH. 



2 H 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



Acham, William, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 
attend the Duchess of Burgundy 
on her visit to this country. 

Ageletts, 115, 119, 120, 124, 
125, 139, 153. 

Ageletts were pieces of silver or 
other metal, or tags, attached to 
the ends of laces or points. Pals- 
grave, in his Esclarcissement de la 
Langue Francaise in 1530, trans- 
lates " Agglet of a lace or poynt" 
by "fer;" and in the Promptorium 
Parvulorum, in the Harleian MS. 
221, is " An agglot or an aglet to 
lace with all." A pointmaker was 
paid 2d. per dozen for pointing 
points of silk with ageletts of 
, laton. Spenser speaks of a dress 
" With golden aigulets that glis- 
tered bright." 

The various notices of ageletts in 
these Accounts afford informa- 
tion as to the different uses to 
which they were applied. From 
p. 125 and p. 153, it appears that 
they were placed as ornaments on 
harnesses, being fixed with small 
chains. 

Ambassadors, 121, 141. 

The first of these entries relates 
to the washing of bedding which 
had been used by the ambassadors 
from France, and the second to 
the delivery of beds, &c., for the 
ambassadors of the Duke of Bur- 
gundy. 

Andrew, Richard, 120, 150. 
Citizen and Hosier of London. 

Anneys, bags of fustian stuffed 
with, and with ireos, 131, 137. 
Bags filled with anniseed and 
other spices, to keep insects from 
destroying the clothes, &c., in the 
Great Wardrobe. That anneys 



meant anniseed may be presumed 
from finding the word so spelt, 
under " Spyces" in the Northum- 
berland Household Book, " Powder 
of annes iij Ib. j quarteron," ed. 
1827, P- 19; and in the Promp- 
torium Parvulorum in the Har- 
leian MS. 221, "Aneys seed or 
spice" occurs. 

Apris, John, 164. 

One of the persons sent to attend 
on the Duchess of Burgundy. 

Argenter of France, 160. 

The " Argentier du Roy" is the 
master of the wardrobe, or gen- 
tleman of the robes. The per- 
son here alluded to seems to 
have been in attendance on the 
Duchess of Burgundy, and the 
entry relates to the delivery to 
him of scarlet and violet cloth for 
the use of the princess's suite. 
It is singular that he should be 
called the Argenteer of France. 

Arms, the king's, on clasps, 119. 

on clasps of books, 152. 

It was usual to place the arms of 
the owner on the clasps which 
were generally attached to books. 
Eleanor, Duchess of Gloucester, 
mentions in her will in 1399, " a 
' Chronicle of France' in French, 
with two clasps of silver, ena- 
melled with the arms of the 
Duke of Burgoyne ; a book, con- 
taining the psalter, primer, and 
other devotions, with two clasps of 
gold enamelled with her arms ; a 
French bible in two volumes, with 
two gold clasps enamelled with- 
the arms of France ; and a psalter 
richly illuminated with the clasps 
of gold enamelled with white 
swans, and the arms of my lord 
and father enamelled on the 
Among the books of Sir 
2 H 2 



236 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



John Fastolfe were a psalter 
clasped with silver, and his and 
his wife's arms engraved thereon. 
Archceologia xxi., p. 276. 

Arms, escutcheons of the arms of 
Lord George Vere, 131. 
It is not easy to explain for what 
purpose these escutcheons of the 
arms of Lord George Vere could 
have been made, or why they 
should have formed part of the 
contents of the great wardrobe. 
See VERE. 

Arras, 117, 120, 130, 132, 136, 
139, 141,146. 

An arras mender " who is howre- 
ly in the warderobe for wyrking 
upon arres and tapestry," was at- 
tached to the household of all 
great persons in the fourteenth 
and fifteenth centuries. Among 
the " officers of the riding house- 
hold of George, Duke of Clarence, 
Anno 9, Edward IV.," was " A 
broderer of Tapacerye for amend- 
ingeoftheArrasse." Collectionof 
Regulations of Royal Households, 
p. 99. Northumberland House- 
hold Book, pp. 45, 48, 326. The 
Earl of Northumberland's arras 
mender in 1512 was allowed 33s. 
4rf. if a yeoman, and xx*. if a 
grome, a year, for his wages, and 
xxs. for finding " al maner of 
stuff belonging to his faculties 
except silke and golde." " Paid 
for v days work in amending arras 
at vj d. the day." History of Hen- 
grave, p. 191. 

Astates, 155, 160. 

" 1/ordes and Astates," lords and 
persons of consequence. 

Asteley, John, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 
attend the Duchess of Burgundy. 

Audley, Lord, 162. 

John Tuchet, Lord Audley, who 
succeeded his father in that ba- 
rony in 1458, and died in 1491. 

Axle-trees, for the king's car, 
123. 

Backs, 129, 134, 150. 

Parts of skins so called. 
Bags of leather, 128. 



Bags of fustian, 131. 

Barehide, 123. 

See this word in the Index to the 
Privy Purse Expenses of Eliza- 
beth of York, p. 175. 

Barge, king's, the master of the, 
159,166. 

Some remarks on the royal barges 
will be found in p. 176 ante. 
These entries relate to the equip- 
ment of the master and rowers 
of the barge which was to wait 
on the Duchess of Burgundy. 
They wore cloth jackets of blue 
and murrey, each jacket being or- 
namented with two small roses, 
and the master also wore a gown 
of black chamlet. 

Bargemen, jackets for the king's, 
166. 

Base of the king's jackets, 150. 

Batillage, 122. 

Batillage appears to be nearly 
synonimous with the word to 
which it is joined boat hire, 
from batellus, a little boat. In 
the " Liber Quotidianus Garde- 
robe, 28th Edward I.," is the fol- 
lowing entry. To Dom John de 
Langeford, among other pay- 
ments, " Una cum batellagio 
ejusdem Domini Johannis inter 
Westmon. et London." p. 47- 
Batellus occurs often in those ac- 
counts, pp. 54, 72, and 272, &c. 
Libera battella, a free boat, oc- 
curs in the Plac. in Itin. at 
Chester, 14th Henry VII. See 
Blount's Glossary. 

Baudkins, 135. 

of silk, 116, 158. 

A rich cloth, now called brocade. 
The name is said to have been 
derived from Baldacus, from Ba- 
bylon, whence it was originally 
brought. Blount. By statute 
12th and 14th Edward IV., it 
was enacted, that all cloths of 
gold, cloths of silver, ofbawdekyn 
velvet, damask, satin, sarcenet, 
tartaron, chamelet, and every 
other cloth of silk made beyond 
the sea, and then being in the 
kingdom, and offered for sale, 
should be sealed with the seals of 
the collectors of the subsidy of 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



237 



poundage and tonnage Rot. 

Parl. vi., 155. 
Baudwyn, Piers, stationer, 125, 

126. 
Baynard's Castle, 122. 

See a note in the Privy Purse 

Expenses of Elizabeth of York, 

p. 176. 
Beasts, 129, 134. 

Query, a measure containing 

many furs, or a single one, most 

probably the latter. 

Bedding, 124, 130, 140, 141, 
142, 143. 

Bedmakers, 126, 128. 

Beds, yeoman of the, 145. 
Peter Wraton. 

office of the, 140. 

for making of various 

kinds, 126. 

Beds, 130, 137. 

Berkeley, William, 158, 164, 
165. 

Esquire of the king's body, who 
was protected from the effect of 
the act of resumption, 22nd Ed- 
ward IV., 1482. Rot. Parl. vi., 
200. He was sent to wait on the 
Duchess of Burgundy, having 
four men to attend upon him, and 
was present at Edward IV.'s 
funeral. Archceologia i., 352. 

Besteney, John, 164. 

One of the persons sent to attend 
on the Duchess of Burgundy. 

Bible, Historical, 126, 152. 
See BOOKS. 

Bible, the, 126, 152. 
See BOOKS. 

Blankets, 124, 131, 133, 137, 
139, 141, 142, 144, 149. 

Boat hire, for, 122. 
See BATILLAGE. 

Bogy, 129, 134, 166. 

legs and shanks, 116, 166. 

Budge is described as lambs 
fur, but it was sometimes used 
for another kind of fur. Pals- 
grave translates " bouge furre, 
romenis peaux de Lombardie." 
In the statute 37 Edward III., 
the word " bugee" was used to 
describe fur generally. " Ne 



mil manere de Pellure ou de 
bugee, mes soulment d'aignel, 
conil, chat, et gopil." Rot. Parl. 
ii., pp. 278, 281. But in the 
Wardrobe Accounts of the 28th 
Edward I., 1301, the word is thus 
used, " Pro pellura diversa fururis 
et capuciis tarn de Bog'' quam de 
agnis, &c.," p. 354. John Colet, 
Dean of St. Pauls, by his will in 
1519, bequeathed his " best coat 
of chamlet furred with black 
bogys." 

Bolsters, 118, 131, 132, 137, 
139, 143, 144. 

Bolts, 127. 

Bolyons, 119, 139, 152. 

Bolions appear to have been a 
smaller sort of button used as 
fastenings of books,&c.; they were 
made of copper and gilded, and 
cost about eight pence each. Pals- 
grave translates " bullion of a 
woman's girdle" by " close." 

for gilding old, 126. 

Bonnets, 119, 131, 138, 149, 
150, 166. 

See a note on " bonnets" in the 
index to the Privy Purse Ex- 
penses of Elizabeth of York. 
p. 179. 

Books, the king's, removed and 
garnished, &c., 125, 126, 152. 

silk for laces and tassels 

of, and garnishing, 117, 152. 

for binding, 125, 152. 

The books, the titles of which are 
mentioned, are " Titus Livius," 
" The Holy Trinity," " Frois- 
sart," " The Bible," " The Go- 
vernment of Kings and Princes," 
" La Forteresse de Foy," " The 
" Book of Josephus," and " The 
Bible Historial." 

The " Government of Kings 
and Princes" was, probably, 
a translation of " jEgidius Ro- 
manus de Regimine Principum," 
which is conjectured by Weston 
to have been translated into 
English by John Trevisa. A 
MS. entitled " Regime des 
Princes par Gilles de Rome, a 
Monseigneurs fils du Roy Phi- 
lipe le Bel," was in the library of 
Galway Mills, Esq., in 1800, 



238 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



which was stated to have been 
translated from the Latin of JEgi- 
dius Romanus into French verse 
by Henri de Gauche. The volume 
alluded to in these Accounts was 
apparently in French. 

" Froissard" was of Course 
Froissart's Chronicles, and was 
probably highly illuminated. Per- 
haps the most beautifully illumi- 
nated copy in existence is in the 
Harleian collection marked Nos. 
4379, 4380. 

Several copies of the "Le Bible 
Historiaux," ou " Les Hystoires 
Escolastres," are among the Royal 
MSS. in the British Museum 
marked 19 D ii. iii. iv. v., and 15 
D iii. See the Printed Catalogue, 
p. 299. One of them has the 
following paragraph written in it, 
" Cest livre fust pris ove le 
Roy de France a la bataille de 
Peyters ; et le bon Counte de 
Saresbir, William Montagu la 
achata pur cent mars et le dona 
a sa compaigne Elizabeth le bone 
Countesse qe Dieux assoile. Et est 
continus le Bible, entre ove fixt et 
glose le mestre des Histoires et 
Incidentes : tout en mesme le 
volume, la quele livre la dite 
countesse assigna a ses execu tours 
de le vendre pur xl livres." 

" Titus Livius." A MS. en- 
titled " Titus Livius ; des Fais 
des Remains: translate par Pierre 
Berthetire avec peintures," is in 
the British Museum, Royal MS. 
15 D vi. 

" La Forteresse du Foy." Two 
MSS. with this title are among 
the Royal MSS. in the British 
Museum, the one which has only 
the four first books, is marked 19 
E iv., and the other 17 F vi., 
which is thus described in Casley's 
catalogue, " La Fortresse de la 
Foy 5 liv. aveque belles Peinc- 
tures faite a Lisle en Flandres 
per Jehan du Quesne." 

" The Book of Josephus." 
Several copies of Josephus' His- 
tory are in the British Museum, 
marked 10 A x ; 13 D vi, and vii, 
and 13 E viii. 

Boots of various kinds, 119, 138, 
152. 



Borough, Sir Thomas, 162. 

Then knight of the king's body. 
He was the father of Sir Thomas 
Borough or Burgh, K.G., who 
was summoned to parliament as 
a baron in the 3rd Henry VII., 
and was the ancestor of all the 
subsequent barons. 

Botews, pairs of, 119, 125, 138, 
147, 148, 151, 159, 166. 

Botews were a kind of large boot, 
covering the whole leg, and some- 
times reached above the knee. 
By statute 2 and 3 Edward IV., 
1463-4, it was ordained " that 
noo knyght under thastate of a 
lorde, squier, gentilman, or other 
persone, use nor were eny shoes 
or boteux, havyng pykes passyng 
the lengh of ij ynches," on pain 
of forfeiting 40rf., and the same 
penalty was to be inflicted on any 
" cornyser" who made pykes of 
shoen or boteux" of a greater 
length. Rot. Parl. v., 505. In 
the same year, the importation of 
tanned bates, shoen, galoches or 
corhes, &c., was strictly pro- 
hibited. Ibid. p. 507 ; and in the 
4th Edward IV., cordwainers and 
coblers in the City of London, or 
within three miles of it, were 
forbidden to make " eny shoes, 
galoges or botes with pykes" above 
two inches ; or upon any Sunday, 
or on the feasts of the Nativity, 
Ascension, and Corpus Christi, 
" to sell or comaunde or make to 
be sold eny shoes, botes,or galoges,"" 
or " to put, sette or doo uppon 
any mannes fete or legges eny 
shoes, botes, or galoges upon pain 
of forfeiting 20*." Ibid. p. 566. 
In previous statutes, the only 
articles of the kind spoken of 
are " botes et soulers," and 
botews seem hitherto to have 
been confounded, and even by 
Strutt, who cites these entries, 
with boots. Dresses and Habits, 
ii., 346. That they were different 
is clearly proved by these Ac- 
counts ; and in the Promptoritim 
Parvulorum in the Harleian MS. 
221, they are thus described, 
" Bote for a mannys legge, bota, 
ocrea; Botew, cothurnus, botu- 
la," which admits of the inference 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



that a botew was what was pre- 
viously called the smaller boot, 
buskin, or galoche. This, how- 
ever, ill agrees with finding that 
botews are mentioned as always 
reaching " above the knee," 
or reaching " unto the knee," 
whilst boots are merely noticed as 
being made of various sorts of 
leather. Botews that came above 
the knee were rather dearer than 
those which only reached to it, 
but they were of much less price 
than boots. 

Bo tons. 

See BUTTONS. 

Boylet, Robert, 121, 124, 125. 

A servant of the wardrobe. 

Brampston, Thomas, 164. 

One of the persons sent to attend 
on the Duchess of Burgundy. 

Branched velvets, and velvets 
with branches, 156. 
Probably what is now termed fi- 
gured velvet. 

Bray, Robert, 164. 

One of the persons sent to attend 
on the Duchess of Burgundy. 

Braying ropes for the king's car, 

123. 
Breast coverchiefs, 148. 

Coverchiefs used to cover the 

breast. 

Bridles, of various kinds, 123. 
Brigandines, for coverings of, 

159, 162. 

Jackets with pieces of iron quilted 
in them, which were generally 
used by a.rcheTS^-j4rcha;ologia xxi. 
271. It is evident from these 
accounts that the brigandines of 
persons of rank were sometimes 
covered with cloth of gold, and 
other rich stuff. 

Broched, cloth broached with 

gold, 134. 

Cloth with words, or ornaments of 
gold worked upon it. In Pals- 
grave " broche with a scripture," 
occurs. 

Broderayns for horses, 153. 

Apparently broad, or wide, reins. 
The word occurs in the list of 



articles for the garnishing of the 
queen's litter and chares " broods 
rayns, v covered with in cloth of 
gold ; brydel rayns ix covered in 
velvet." " Brydels, vj with bytts 
bossed, with broode rayns and 
chayns ; the same bridels covered 
in cloth of gold and garnyssht 
with crowns and fleur de lys, 
chaast and gilt, and with faux 
rayns, &c." Rayns, and " leding 
rayns" are also mentioned. An- 
tiquarian Repertory, ed. 1807, vol. 
i-, p. 47- 
Browneswyke, 130, 135. 

A kind of linen cloth. No other 
instance has been found of the 
use of this term. Query if cloth 
made at Brunswick be meant. 

Brussell cloth, sheets of, 150, 

151, 152. 
Brusshes of heath, 131, 138, 

149, 151. 

Buckles for harnesses, 125. 
Buckram, 135, 142, 143, 153, 

154, 163. 
Bunteyn, Richard, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 
wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Burden's, i.e., loads, of rushes, 

121, 126. 

Burgundy, Duchess of, 125, 132, 
140, 144, 145, 153,159,160, 
163, 165, 166. 
See the INTRODUCTORY RE- 
MARKS. 

ambassadors of, 140, 

145. 

Buscage, 130, 136. 

Busk, 124, 130, 131, 132, 135, 
137, 140, 143, 146, 148, 149, 
155. 

A sort of linen cloth, and appa- 
rently of a coarse and common 
description, as it was used for 
pallets, linings of vallances, &c. 
The word does not occur in the 
Rolls of Parliament, but busk ap- 
pears to have been the article 
called bustian in the sumptuary 
law of the 3rd and 4th Edward 
IV. " No man but such as hath 



240 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



possessions of the yerely value of 
xls." shall use or wear " in aray 
for his body, any fustian, bustian, 
nor fustian of Napuls, scarlet 
cloth engrained, &c."-Rot. Parl. 
v., 505 a. Among the effects of 
Henry V. were " I rem' de bus- 
tian cont' xvij alnz, pris 1' aln' 
iij d." 

Buttons, 117, 136, 152, 161. 

Calais, Staple, a merchant of 
the, 133. 

Cameletts. 

See CHAMLET. 

Candles, 121. 

Canterbury, 145. 

Edward IV. visited Canterbury, 
perhaps with a pious object, some 
time before September in 1480. 

Canvas, 130, 135, 137. 

Capes of cloaks, &c., 151. 

Car, the king's, 122, 125. 

expenses of repairing the 

king's, 123. 
See CAB. in tb,e Additional Notes. 

Carmen, the king's, 125. 

Carpenters, to, 127. 

Carpets, 130, 135. 

Carriage, for, of divers articles, 
122, 124, 125. 

Cartemaille, Richard, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 
wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Carter, Richard, 125. 

One of the king's servants. 

John, 121. 

These two persons seem to be 
described by the name of their 
occupation. 

Caster, John, 120. 
A skinner. 

Cave, John, 126. 

A bedmaker. 
Celours, i.e., ceilings of beds, 

132, 135, 141, 142, 143. 
Cering, 125, 127. 
Cering candel', 121. 
Chains of laten for fixing in 

agelettes, 125. 



Chairs, 131. 

for mending, garnishing, 

and repairing, 121, 144. 

Chambering of tapestry, 137. 
Tapestry used for covering the 
sides of rooms. 

Chamelet, 116, 129, 134, 151, 
155, 157, 159, 166, 167,168. 

Chests, 122. 

Chevel bolt for the king's car, 
123. 

Cheynewe, George, 163. 

One of the persons appointed to 
attend the Duchess of Burgundy. 
As he was allowed a man to wait 
upon him, he was evidently a 
gentleman, and was probably the 
George Cheynu who was pro- 
tected in the enjoyment of cer- 
tain grants by the act of resump- 
tion 22ud Edward IV., 1482. 
Rot. Parl. vi., 201 a. Perhaps 
he was the George Cheyney, 
a yeoman usher, who attended 
the funeral of Edward IV. Ar- 
chatologia i., 353. 

Cheyney, John, Esq., 153, 167. 
Esquire of the body, and master 
of the Henxmen. He attended 
his sovereign's funeral. In the 
reign of Richard III., his offices 
were filled by another person, and 
it is not improbable that he was 
the Sir John Cheney who dis- 
tinguished himself in the service 
of Henry VII. at Bos worth field, 
and who, in the 3rd Hen. VII., 
was created a baron ; became a 
knight of the garter, and died 
8. P. about 1496. Archceologia i., 
350, 368, 375. Dugdale's Ba- 
ronage ii., 290. 

Chirke, Geoffrey, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 
attend on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

( Clasps of copper gilt, 119, 139, 
X 152. 

Some of these clasps, which were 
marked with the king's arms, 
were probably used with apparel; 
the others were for books, and 
were engraved with roses. See 
ARMS. 
for gilding, 126. 



INDEX AND NOTKS. 



241 



Claver, Anne, silkwoman, 117, 
125. 

See a note on Silkwomen under 
CORSE. 
Clerk, John, 170. 

Auditor of the king's exchequer. 
In the 1st Henry VII., a John 
Clerke and Richard Sheldon were 
protected in their office of the 
auditorship of divers lands which 
had belonged to George, Duke of 
Clarence Rot. Parl. vi., 355. 
A John Clerke was appointed one 
of the barons of the exchequer in 
Trinity term, 1461 ; and was 
dead in the 7th Henry VII 
Hid. p. 451. A person of those 
names was also searcher of the 
town and port of Calais in the 
3rd Henry VII. Ibid. 405. 

Cloaks, 151. 

Cloth of gold of various kinds, 

116, 129, 134,146, 147,149, 

]50, 154,155,158, 159,161, 

162, 163. 
of silver, 116, 129, 134, 

160. 
French, of various kinds, 

115, 116, 134, 160, 166. 
of Mustreviliers, 115, 169, 



170. 

See MUSTREVILLIERS. 
russet, 166. 

See RUSSET. 

Clove Hammer, 120, 138. 
Cloutes, 123. 

Iron plates to keep axle-trees 

from wearing. 

Coffers, 122. 

CCoffins, i. e., chests of fir, for 
^-books, 125. 

Coket, John, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 
wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Coldherber, 124, 126, 141, 144, 
145. 

Coldharbour, or, as it was some- 
times called, " the Harbour," in 
Thames Street, London, was the 
residence of Richard Neville, Earl 
of Salisbury, in the 32d Henry 
VI., 1453. Rot. Parl. v., 450. 



In the 7*b. Edward IV., it appears 
to have been in the hands of the 
crown, probably in consequence 
of the attainder of the earl in 
1459, as in 1467 it was granted 
to Ann, Duchess of Exeter, the 
king's sister, for life. Rot. Parl. 
vi., 215, who died seized there- 
of; but on her death in 1476, 
Coldharbour seems to have again 
reverted to the crown, and to 
have been granted to John Ne- 
ville, afterwards Marquis Mon- 
tagu, third son of the Earl of 
Warwick; for in the 14th Ed ward 
IV., 1474, it was the king's in- 
tention to have caused the mar- 
quis to be attainted, which mea- 
sure he only refrained from taking 
at the instance of George, Duke of 
Clarence, and other peers, but he 
nevertheless granted to the Duke, 
who married the coheir of the 
marquis's elder brother, certain of 
his lands, of which the mansion 
or messuage called " The Har- 
bour," was part, to him and his 
heirs, so long as there were heirs 
male of the body of the said 
marquis. Ibid., vi., 125. Cold- 
harbour again reverted to the 
crown on the attainder of the 
Duke of Clarence in 1477 ; and 
in 1 480, the year to which these 
Accounts relate, it was clearly one 
of the royal establishments, and 
was assigned for the residence of 
the Duchess of Burgundy on her 
visit to this country, and also of 
the ambassadors from Burgundy. 
It was for some time the Herald's 
College. 

Collars, horse, 123. 

Cologne thread, 146. 

Call' silke, or Cologne silk, was 
forbidden to be imported on pain 
of forfeiture by statute 22nd Ed- 
ward IV. 

Combe Coverchiefs, 122, 150. 
From the number of these ar- 
ticles, twelve, and their size, each 
being an ell long, it may be con- 
jectured that they were worn on 
the head by men as well as by 
women. Chaucer says, 
" Hire coverchiefs weren ful fine 

of ground, 

I dorse swere they weyeden a 
pound, 

2 I 



242 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



That on the Sonday were upon 

hire hede." 

By the regulations for ladies' 
mourning by the Countess of 
Richmond in 1492, a duchess 
was allowed four kerchiefs, and 
a countess two kerchiefs, besides 
a barb and a frontlet to each. 
Handkerchiefs edged with gold 
were among the effects of Henry 
VIII. Harleian MS., 1419. 

Cooke, Roger, 132. 

Servant of the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 
Coppersmith, John, 119, bis, 

121. 

Cord, 137, 140. 
Cordwainers, 118, 119. 
Corse of silk and satin, 117, 
122, 133, 136, 152. 
" Corse of a gyrdell, tissu. 
Corse weaver, tissutier." Pals- 
grave. 

A corse of silk seems to have 
been wove or plaited silk, as Cot- 
grave explains " Tissu, a bawd- 
rick, ribbon, fillet, or head band 
of woven stuff," also " woven 
plaited, interlaced, wound one 
within another." In the 34th 
Henry VI., to encourage our own 
manufactures, " wrought silk 
throwen, ribans, laces, corses of 
silke or eny oyer thing wrought 
touching or concernyng silke 
wymmens craft, the corses that 
commen out of Geen only except," 
were prohibited to be imported for 
five years.-/to/. Parl. v., 325. See 
also p. 506, vi., 223. By statute 
3rd and 4th Edward IV., knights 
under the degree of a lord, and 
their wives, were prohibited from 
wearing " eny manere corses 
wrought with gold.' ' And esquires 
and gentlemen, and other per- 
sons under the rank of a knight, 
and their wives, were forbidden 
to wear " eny corses wrought like 
to velvet or to sateyn frizery." 
Ibid., vi. 505 b. 

From the statute of the 34th 
Henry VI., it appears, that the 
manufacture of silk was confined 
to women, by which employment, 
it is said, that " many a worship- 
full woman within the citee have 



lyved full honourably, and ther- 
with many good housholdes kept, 
and many gentilwymmen and 
other in grete noumbre like as 
there nowe be moo than a thou- 
sand have be drawen under theym 
inlernyngethesamecraftes." The 
importation of wrought silks is 
said to have caused " grete ydelnes 
amongs yonge gentilwymmen and 
oyer apprentices of the same 
craftes, and the leying down of 
many good and notable hous- 
holdes of them that have occu- 
pied the same craftes which be 
convenient, worshipfull, and ac- 
cordyng for gentilwymmen and 
other wymmen of worship." In 
reformation of these inconve- 
niences, and " also the premisses 
tenderly considered and howe it 
is no commoditee nor thing abi- 
dyng to th'enrichyng of this 
lande, but things of plesaunce for 
theym that liken to have them, 
whiche every well disposed per- 
sone of this lande by reason and 
natural favour wold rather that 
wymmen of their nation born and 
owen blode hade the occupation 
thereof than strange people of 
other landes," pray, &c. 
Costers, 126, 141. 

Pieces of tapestry used on the 
sides of a table, and on the 
benches round it ; and a doser 
was the part placed at the back. 
Ann, Lady Maltravers, bequeath- 
ed, by her will, in 13?4, "a doser 
of green powdered with dolphins 
with four costers of the same 
suit." William, Lord Morley, 
in 1379, gave his son his " best 
dorser, four costers and one ban- 
ker with his arms." Costers 
were also the sides of beds. 
Joane, Lady Bergavenny, in 
1434, bequeathed her bed of silk, 
black and red, embroidered with 
woodbine flowers of silver, and 
all the costers and apparel that 
belongeth thereto. She also be- 
queathed her hullyng of black, 
red and green, with morys letters, 
with cushions, with bancours, 
and costers. Among the effects 
of Henry V. were " 1 coster de 
worstede' vermaille cont' xi verges 
de longur' & iii verg' de large. 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



243 



Item vi tapites vermaille, chescun 
de vj verges de longur, et iiij 
verges de large, pris le pece iiij *." 
Also seven costers of arras of 
gold worked with various histo- 
ries, for instance, " Cest emprise 
de haul noun." " Si poer voier 
en memoire" " of Abraham and 
Isaak," of the " vjoies de Nostre 
Dame," &c. 

Costerings, or carpets, 118, 137, 
143, 144. 

See CARPETS. Costerings appear 
to have been very similar to cos- 
ters. Vide also the places where 
the word occurs. 

Cosyn, Agnes, 121. 
A sempstress. 

Counters, 128. 

Pieces resembling money former- 
ly used in calculations. Palsgrave 
translates " counters to caste a 
count with" by " ject." 

Counterpoints, for, 117, 118, 
129, 135, 136, 137, 142, 143. 

Another name for a counterpane. 
Katherine, Lady Hastings, speaks 
in one part of her will, dated in 
1503, of a bed of arras, sillor, 
tester, and counterpane; and in 
another place, of certain " stuff 
of bedding, that is to say, a feller, 
tester, and counterpoint of rose- 
mary ;" and of " afedur bedde, 
a boulster, a blanket, a chike 
happing, an olde counterpoint, 
sillor, and testor." The coun- 
terpoints mentioned in these Ac- 
counts varied as much in size, as 
in material and price. 

Counting cloth, green cloth for 
a, 170. 

Courser harness, 115, 124, 
153. 

Courteys, Piers, 113, seepe. 

Keeper of the king's Great 
Wardrobe. A special warrant was 
issued by the king, dated 18th 
November, 12th Edward IV., 
commanding that a clause should 
be inserted in the Rolls or Records 
of the Resumption of the Par- 
liament held at Westminster, the 
29th April, 3d Edward IV., in 
favour of " our trusty and well- 



beloved servaunt, Piers Curteys, 
and Alice Russell, the provision 
which ensueth." This provision 
protected the said Piers and Alice 
in the enjoyment of all grants of 
lands made to them on the 25th 
October, 4th Edward IV., and 
enacted that the said grant should 
be effectual to them and the heirs 
males of their bodies coming. In 
the Act of Resumption, 4th Ed- 
ward IV., Piers Curteys, Groom 
of the Robes, and William Trus- 
sel, Yeoman of the Crown, were 
secured in the possession of Deer- 
fal Wood and Paletop Wood in 
Leicester, and Curteys and Alice 
Russell were then protected in 
the enjoyment of the grant above 
mentioned ; and again in the 7th 
and 8th Edward IV., in the act 
of the 13th Edward IV., and 
in that of the 1st Henry VII., he 
was protected in the enjoyment 
of the offices of keeper of a 
ward in Leicester Frith, and 
another in Beaumont Lees, of 
bailiff of Leicester, and feodary 
of the king's honour there, and 
also of the office of keeper of the 
Privy Palace of Westminster, 
and of the Wardrobe within the 
same. Rot. Parl. v.,517, 536 b, 
592, 594 b, 610 b, vi., 87, 372. 
The grant in the 3d Edward IV. 
to Courteys and Alice Russell 
was of divers messuages in Lei- 
cester and Derby, which had 
been forfeited by Everard Digby. 
Calcnd. Rut. Patent., 309. 

Piers Courteys preserved his 
office of keeper of the wardrobe 
during the usurpation of Richard 
III. Antiquarian Repertory, vol. 
i., p. 35. His salary was 100/. a 
year. See p. 128. 

Coverchief, 166, hand and breast, 
148, comb, 150. 
The breast coverchief was worn 
over a shirt, and the king pos- 
sessed an equal number of them 
and of shirts. 

Among the linen of the Earl of 
Northumberland in 1512, were 
" al maner of kurcheifs, ande hed 
kercheifs breest kerchiefs heede 
kercheifs.'' Ed. 1827, p. 350. 
The " head kerchief " was pro- 
bably the article here called a 
2 I 2 



244 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



"comb-kerchief." Lady Bryan, 
in a letter asking for linen for 
the princess, afterwards Queen 
Elizabeth, when a child, com- 
plains that she had " neither 
gown nor kertel, nor pete cote ; 
nor no maner of linnin for 
smokes, nor cerchefes, nor sieves, 
nor rayls, nor body stychets, nor 
handcerchers, nor mofelers, nor 
begens." Ellis's Original Letters^ 
second series, ii., p. 80. 

Crochets of various sizes, 120, 
121, 138, 145. 

Crowns, roses, and suns, em- 
broidered on various articles, 
118, 137,143,144. 
A white rose, en soleil, or sur- 
rounded by the sun, was a fa- 
vourite badge of Edward IV. 
The rose is said to have been 
first used by Edward of Langley, 
Duke of York ; and the sun was 
assumed in consequence of the 
singular appearance in the hea- 
vens, on the morning previous to 
the battle of Mortimer Cross, of 
three suns, which, as the day ad- 
vanced, became joined in one, 
an omen the Yorkists afterwards 
construed into a signal of vic- 
tory, and which Edward thus 
perpetuated. See Willement's 
Regal Heraldry, pp. 45 and 53, 
where a drawing of the badge oc- 
curs : on the king's great seal the 
rose and sun are represented se- 
parately. Sandford's Genealogical 
History. The crown was, of 
course, introduced on the articles 
noticed in these Accounts as indi- 
cative of the rank of the royal 
owner. 

Cruppers, 123. 

Cupbearer to the king, 157. 

Edward Stanley. See STANLEY. 
Cupboards of ostriche board, 

131. 
Cupboard clothes, 124, 129, 

135, 141. 

See CUPBOARD, p. 190. 
Curtains, 126, 129, 132, 133, 

135, 140, 142, 143, 144. 
Cushions of various kinds, 131, 

137. 



Cushion cloths, 130. 

Damasks, 115, 116, 129, 134, 
146, 148, 158, 161. 
Esquires, gentlemen, and other 
persons under the rank of a knight 
were not allowed to wear damask 
or satin, excepting the officers of 
the king's household, by statute 
3rd and 4th Edward IV., and 
22nd Edward IV. Rot. Part. 
v., 504, vi., 221. 

Dancaster, Thomas, clerk of the 
wardrobe, 128, 170. 

Darcy, Thomas, esquire of the 
body, 164, 165. 
He attended the funeral of Ed- 
ward IV. Archceologia, i., 350. 

Dawbers, 1 27. 

Davy, John, of Fowey, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 
wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Diaper work, table cloths of, 
131, 139. 

Dobinson, Thomas and William, 
164. 

Two of the persons who were ap- 
pointed to wait on the Duchess of 
Burgundy, each of [whom was 
allowed a servant to attend upon 
him. 

Dorset, the Marquis of, 161, 
163. 

Thomas Grey, K.G., Marquis of 
Dorset, to which dignity he was 
elevated on the 18th of April, 
1475. He was the son-in-law of 
the king, being the eldest son of 
Sir John Grey, Lord Ferrers of 
Groby, by Elizabeth Wydvile, 
who married, secondly, King 
Edward IV. The marquis was 
attainted in the 1st Richard III., 
but was restored in blood and 
honours the 7th Henry VII., and 
died in 1501. 

Doserfor a horse, 123. 

Doublets, 124, 146, 147, 149, 
150, 166, 167. 

Dowell, Ralph, 141, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 
wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



245 



Down, 137, 143, 144. 

Dragon, the, 121, 127. 

Probably an inn with the sign of 
the dragon, which appears to have 
been situated very near to the 
Great Wardrobe. 

Draper, Piers, 120, 122. 
Citizen and ironmonger. 

Dunkan, William, yeoman tay- 
lor, 169. 

Easter, John, 128. 

A skinner. 
Elizabeth, the princess, 159. 

Afterwards the queen of Henry 

VII. 

Eltham, 122, 125. 

It appears from one of these en- 
tries that Katherine, the king's 
daughter, was baptized and. pro- 
bably was born at the royal palace 
of Eltham in 1480. 

Emayled, 146, 147. 

Enamelled is sometimes writ- 
ten anelyd, as in the following 
entry in the Churchwardens' Ac- 
counts of St. Mary Hill, London, 
in 1486. " Item a myter for a 
Bishop at Seint Nycholas tide 
garnyshed with silver and anelyd, 
and perle, and couuterfete stone." 
Nichols' Illustrations of Ancient 
Manners, p* 114. The word also 
occurs in the account of articles 
delivered from the Great Ward- 
robe for the coronation of Richard 
III. : " vij yerdes of crymsyn 
cloth of gold emayled." Antiqua- 
rian Repertory, ed. 1807. Vol. i., 
pp. 35, 36. 

Empsion, i.e., purchase, 134. 

Ermine, 129, 133, 134, 150. 

Escutcheons of arms, 131. 
See ARMS. 

Esquires of the body, 153, 165, 
167. 

Exchequer, auditors of the, 170. 

Featherbeds, 118, 124, 130, 
131, 132, 133, 137, 139, 143, 
144. 

Ferrara, Duke of, 124. 

Hercules D'Este, Duke of Fer- 



rara, Modena, Reggio, &c., was 
elected a Knight of the Garter 
10th February, lyth Edward IV., 
1480, and a few months after- 
wards the taylor was paid for 
making his gown, hood, mantle, 
&c., of the Order. He died in 
1505. 

Ferrour, 121. 
A blacksmith. 

Fir, coffins, L e., boxes of, 125. 

Flemish cloth, scepe. 

ells, 136, and scepe. 

Font, for covering 1 a font at 
the christening of the king's 
daughter, 122. 
From the minute description of 
the manner in which one of the 
king's children was to be chris- 
tened in the reign of Henry VII., 
it appears that " the Font must be 
set on hight that the pepill may 
see the cristenynge and presse 
not to ny ; and the Font must be 
hangid with a riche sele and over- 
laid about with carpets on the 
greces [steps] and other places ; 
and the Font must be hangide all 
about with clothe of golde and 
laid withine withe small lyn 
clothe," &c. Antiquarian Reper- 
tory, ed. 1807, vol. i. p. 305. 

Foot cloths of velvet, for horses, 
153, 154. 

" A cloth protecting the feet, 
f. e., housings of cloth which 
hung on every side of a horse. 
It was long considered as a mark 
of great dignity and state." 
Nares's Glossary; and see the 
examples he cites. The Earl 
of Bath, in October 1553, in a 
letter to his countess describing 
the coronation of Queen Mary, 
says, " The bearer will tell you 
how my son served me of my fate 
cloth and horse harness which he 
promised you, but and I had made 
other provision myself of my owne 
I had bynne like to have taken 
dishonor." History of Hengrave, 
p. 144. 

Foot sheets, 151. 

Sheets used at the bottom of a 
bed : from the notice of head 
sheets and foot sheets it would 



246 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



seem that a sheet did not then 
extend the whole length of abed. 
In an account of different cere- 
monies in the reign of Henry 
VII., the term is thus used : 

" As FOB. NEW YERRIS DAY. 

Item on new yerris day in the 
mornynge, the kinge when he 
comythe to his foote schete an 
uschere of the chambre to be redy 
at the chambre dore and say ' Sire 
here is a yerris yeft comynge from 
the quene.' And then he shall say 
1 Let it come in Sire.' And then 
the uschere shall let in the mes- 
singer with the yefte, and then 
aftur that the greteste estates 
servaunt is to come, echon aftur 
othere as they bene estates : and 
after that done, all other lordes and 
ladys after their estats that they 
bene of. And all this while the 
kinge muste sit at his fote schete, 
&c. And this done, the kinge 
gothe to make him redy, and go 
to his servis in what array that 
hym likithe." " Item the quene 
then in likewise to sit sAhirfote 
shelt^" &c. Antiquarian Reper- 
tory. 

Footmen, clothes for the king's, 
168. 

Forfeited goods, 122, 123. 

Forfeiture was then, as now, the 
usual penalty for transgressing 
the laws regulating the importa- 
tion of goods. The statute under 
which the seizure here noticed 
was made was probably that of 
the 3rd Edward IV., c. 4, by 
which corses [See CORSES,] were 
prohibited to be imported on pain 
of forfeiture, the one-half of 
which was to go to the king, and 
the other half to him that first 
seized it. 

Forms, joined, and other, 131, 

138. 
Forteresse de Foy, a book so 

called, 126. 
See BOOKS. 

Fox skins, 116, 134. 
France, ambassadors of, 121. 
Franche cloth, 125. 
Query French cloth. 



Freman, Thomas, 164. 

One of the persons sent to wait 
on the Duchess of Burgundy. 

French books, 126. 

Fringes of silk and gold, 130, 
136. 

Froissart's Chronicles, 126, 152. 
See BOOKS. 

Frysley, John, Clerk of the 
king's stables, 153. 
He held the same office in the 1st 
Richard IllArchceologia, i.,375. 

Thomas, 143. 

One of the servants of the ward- 
robe. 

Furs, 121, 128, 129, 134. 
Furring of robes, for, 120. 
Fustians, 118, 124, 130, 132, 
133, 135, 139, 140, 141, 144, 
145, 148. 

bags of, stuffed with 

ireos and anneys, 131, 137. 
Fyssher, Davy, 164. 

One of the persons sent to attend 
on the Duchess of Burgundy. 

Gardener, Richard, 121. 
A labourer. 

Garments, for making the king's, 
120. 

Garnishing books, 1 52. 
See BOOKS. 

Garter, a gown, mantle, and 
hood of the Order of the, 124. 
See FERRARA. 

mantle of the Order of 

the, 161. 
See YORK. 

Garters, 117, 125, 136, 161. 

Garters of the Order of the Gar- 
ter. 

Gentils, i. e., gentry, 160. 

Gentlewomen, for the conveying 
and trussing of, 145. 
This entry seems to defy expla- 
nation. The only meaning of 
" trussing" is to pack close, but 
it is as difficult to reconcile 
" packing" with " ix worthy 
gentlewomen" as to conceive what 
" thirty ells of embroidered busk" 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



or cloth can have had to do with 
''conveying them." It probably 
meant trussing or packing their 
baggage. 

Gifts, lists of, given to the Duke 
of York and other person- 
ages, 155. 

Gilmin, 124. 
A sadler. 

Girdles, 117, 136, 149, 150, 

166. 

Glass, a standing, 131. 
Gloves, 131, 137, 149. 

Gloves were forbidden to be im- 
ported in the 3rd and 4th Edward 
IV., which is the only notice of 
the article on the Rolls of Parlia- 
ment. 

Gold of Venice, 117. 
Goldsmiths, 119. 
Government of Kings and 
Princes, a book so called, 126, 
152. 

See BOOKS. 

Gowns, various, 124, 146, 147, 
148, 149, 150, 156,157, 159, 
160, 161, 166, 167. 
Grace Dieu, 145. 
Grafton, Thomas, 133. 

Merchant of the staple of Calais. 
Granford, Thomas, 164. 

One of the persons sent to attend 
on the Duchess of Burgundy. 

John, yeoman of the 

crown, 162. 

Greenwich, 122. 

manor of, 141. 

Grenerigge, William, 164. 

One of the persons sent to at- 
tend on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Grey, George, 157. 

Son and heir apparent of Edmund, 
Lord Grey of Ruthyn, first Earl 
of Kent, whom he succeeded in 
his honours in 1488. He mar- 
ried first, and on the occasion 
here alluded to, King Edward's 
sister-in-law, Anne Wydville, 
' daughter of Richard Earl Rivers, 
and widow of William Viscount 
Bourchier, by whom he had 



Richard, his son and successor ; 
and secondly, Katherine, daugh- 
ter of William Herbert, Earl of 
Pembroke, and died in the 20th 
Henry VII. 

Grey, Sir Thomas, chamberlain 
to the Duke of York, 156. 

The name of Grey was so com- 
mon in the fifteenth century that 
it is difficult to identify this per- 
son. 

Greyson, John, 164. 

Another of the persons appointed 
to wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Guyon, Oliver, 164. 

One of the persons sent to attend 
on the Duchess of Burgundy. 

Hached, cloth of silver hached 
on satin ground, 160. 
" Hatch, to shade by lines in 
drawing or graving." Todd's 
Johnson. 

In this instance " hatched" ap- 
pears to mean cloth slightly em- 
broidered with silver on a satin 
ground. 

Hackney, 154. 

Halle, Richard, 164. 

One of the persons sent to attend 
on the Duchess of Burgundy. 

William, yeoman tailor, 

169. 

Halters for horses, 123. 

Hamerton, John, 164. 

One of the persons sent to attend 
on the Duchess of Burgundy. 

Hand coverchiefs, 122, 148. 
See COVERCHIEFS. 

Harness, for covering, 154, 155. 

Harnesses for horses, 115, 124, 
125, 133, 154, 155, 165. 
From these descriptions of the 
harnesses of horses used by per- 
sons of high rank, it is evident 
that they must have presented a 
splendid appearance ; and fully 
agree with the representations in 
illuminated MSS. of the period. 

of Milan, 124. 
Milan was long famous for the 
manufacture of armour and other 



248 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



articles of steel. Philip Lord 
Darcy, in! 1398, bequeathed to his 
son " his coat of mail of Mi/an." 

Hastings, Pursuivant, 119, 125, 

133. 

Hatche, Thomas, 118. 
Apparently a shoe-maker. 

Hatche, 138. 

This entry seems to refer to that 
in p. 118, where it is stated that 
two pair of slippers were bought 
of Thomas Hatche. 

Hatthe, Thomas, 165. 

One of the king's wards. From 
his apparel it is evident he was a 
gentleman. 

Hats, 149. 

Hats of wool, 119, 138, 150, 
166. 

" A hat of estate" about this time 
is thus described in the list of 
articles delivered for the corona- 
tion of Richard III. : " ij hattes 
of estate with rounde rolles be- 
hind and sharp beks before co- 
vered in crymysyn cloth of gold 
and furred with ermyns which 
were for the use of the queen's 
gentlemen ushers who rode before 
her at that ceremony." Antiqua- 
rian Repertory, ed. 1807- Vol. L, 
p. 45. 

Head sheets, 122, 130, 132, 135, 
143, 144. 

See FOOT SHEETS. 
Head stalls for horses, 153. 

Palsgrave translates " Hedd stall 
of a horse harneis" by " testiere." 
" In the Sadler's shopp, a head 
stall, raines crooper patnell and 
stirrop leathers all of leather very 
fayer studded with gilt stoodes 
and a kind of blewe bugell for a 
man's saddell." Gage's History 
of Henarave, p. 35. 

Henxmen, for the clothes of the 
master of the, and other 
henxmen, 167. 

See HXNXMEN, p. 200. 

Herber, the, 124, 126, 141. 

See COLD HARBOUR. 

Hert, Robert, 168. 

One of the king's footmen. 



Hey wood, Thomas, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 
wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Hinges, 127. 

Hirton, Peter, cordwainer, 118, 

119, 125. 
Hobies, 153. 

A small horse: Palsgrave de- 
scribes hoby to be '' a horse of 
Ireland." 

Hoby, harness, 115, 124, 153. 
Holland cloth, 132, 146, 147, 

148, 149, 155. 

Holy Trinity, a book called the, 
126, 152. 

See BOOKS. 
Horse harness. 
See HARNESS. 

houses, 125. 

Probably what are now called 
" housings," or as written by 
Drydeu "houss;" cloths originally 
used to keep off dirt, now added 
to saddles for ornament. TodcTs 
Johnson. 

" Horse houses" are thus men- 
tioned in the list of articles de- 
livered for the coronation of 
Richard III. : " To the queen 
for her use, xvj korshouses, made 
of xxxvj yerds di' of rede clothe 
engreyled with vj yerds of white 
woollen clothe and lyned with 
xxv ells of canvas ; and for to 
sowe the same horshouses v Ib. of 
threde, and for to cary in to York 
divers horshneys vij elles canvas." 
Antiquarian Repertory, ed. 1807- 
Vol. i.,p. 50. 

Horse, master of the, 153. 

John Cheney, Esq. See CHENEY. 

Hory,John, 164. 

One of the persons sent to wait 
on the Duchess of Burgundy. 

Hosen, 133, 137,148,149, 150, 
151, 166. 

of cloth of divers colours, 

118, 120, 125. 
Howard, Lord, 156. 

Sir John Howard, K.G., who was 
summoned to parliament as a 
baron in 1470, and was created 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



249 



Duke of Norfolk and Earl Mar- 
shal, by Richard III., in the de- 
fence of whose cause he fell at 
Bosworth field. A memoir of 
this eminent personage, the foun- 
der of the honours of the house 
of Howard, with two portraits, 
will be found in Cartwright's 
History of Sussex. 

Hullok, Thomas, 164. 

One of the persons sent to wait 
on the Duchess of Burgundy. 

Huntingdon, Richard, clerk of 

the wardrobe, 128, 170. 
Huntman, John, 122. 

One of the royal servants. 

Jackets, 124, 147, 150, 165, 

166, 167. 

Jackets of woollen cloth, mur- 
rey and blue, 163. 
Murrey and blue were the colours 
of the livery of the house of York. 

Jackson, Thomas, 164. 

One of the persons sent to attend 
on the Duchess of Burgundy. 

Jaks, John, 123. 

Apparently a saddler. 

Jewelle, John, 164. 

One of the persons sent to wait on 
the Duchess of Burgundy. 

Josephus, the book of, 126. 
See BOOKS. 

Jumbard, Martin, embroiderer, 
118, 124. 

Imagery, worked on counter- 
points, 136. 

Ingrain cloth, 115, 129, 169. 

Ink, 128. 

Ireos, bags of fustian stuffed 
with anneys and, 131, 137. 
Anniseed and orris powder placed 
among linen to preserve it from 
insects. A similar entry occurs 
in the Churchwarden's Accounts 
of St. Margaret's, Westminster, 
in 1611. " Paid for a pound of 
orris powder to put among the 
church linen, lOd." Nichol's Il- 
lustrations of Ancient Times, p. 30. 

Ireland, skins of foxes of, 116. 



Ironmonger, 120. 

Island, fox skins of, 134. 

Apparently Iceland, though in p. 
1 16, fox skins of Ireland are 
spoken of. That a communica- 
tion existed between this country 
and Iceland at an early period is 
manifest from two entries on the 
Rolls of Parliament ; the one in 
the 3rd Henry V., when the Com- 
mons stated, that as fish were 
scarce on our coasts, fishermen 
had sought them elsewhere, and 
that having found plenty on the 
coasts of " Island," they had 
fished there for the last six or 
seven years, but that strangers 
from Norway and Denmark had 
begged the king to prevent their 
continuing to do so, and they 
prayed that their request might 
not be successful. Rot. Part, iv., 
78 b. The other was in the 9th 
Henry VI., when the commons 
stated that certain Englishmen 
had gone to " Island" with their 
goods and merchandize, which 
were endangered by an edict of 
the King of Denmark, and that 
some of their ships and goods had 
been seized. Ibid. p. 378. Mr. 
Sharon Turner in his History of 
England, has cited many proofs 
of a trade with Iceland in the 
reign of Richard III. 

Katherine, Lady, her christen- 
ing, 122. 

The king's seventh daughter. 
This entry fixes the date of her 
birth to about September in 1480. 
See the INTRODUCTORY RE- 
MARKS, and many notices of her 
in the Privy Purse Expenses of 
her sister Elizabeth, queen of 
Henry VII. See p. 204, ante. 

Kendale, John, 164. 

One of the persons sent to wait 
on the Duchess of Burgundy. 

Ketiller, Lisbet, 118. 
A bed-maker. 

Kent, Earl of, 157. 

Edmund Grey, fourth Lord Grey 
of Ruthyn. He was created Earl 
of Kent iu May 1465, became 
2 K 



250 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



Lord High Treasurer, and died 

in 1488. 
Keys, 127. 

King, the, 121, 145, 162. 
Knights of the King's body, 162, 

165. 
Kyghley, William, 164. 

One of the persons sent to attend 

on the Duchess of Burgundy. 

Labourers, expenses of, 127. 

The price of labour in 1480 was 

from 4d. to 6d. a day. 
Laces, 117, 120, 125, 136, 149, 
150, 152, 161, 166. 

and tassels of books, 117, 

152. 

Lamb's skins, 129, 134, 165. 
Langtone, Henry, 164. 

One of the persons sent to attend 

on the Duchess of Burgundy. 

Latisnails, 122. 

Laton, 119, 120, 125, 126, 138, 

139, 144. See p. 205, ante. 

Lawn, 130, 135. See p. 206, 

ante. 
Leather, various kinds of, 118, 

138. 

Leder, Richard, 164. 
Lightfoot, John, 164. 

Two persons sent to attend on 
the Duchess of Burgundy. 
Lime, 127. 
Linen cloth of various kinds, 

130, 135. 
Livery to divers persons, 169, 

170. 
Locks of the king's car, for 

mending the, 123. 
Lome, 127. 

Clay-argille. Pafsgrave. 
Lowping, 140, 

Query looping. 

Lucas, John, of Kent, 122, 123. 
A person who seized some contra- 
band satins. 
Lufkyn, George, 124, 155. 

Sergeant tailor of the Great 
Wardrobe. 

Lycour for the king's car, 123. 
Liquor for the barehides. In 



the Privy Purse Expenses of Eli- 
zabeth of York, is an entry of 
" grease for liquoring barehides." 

Lyour, or lyre, 126, 137, 140. 

Lyring of curtains, 140. 

The word is thus used in the 
Northumberland Household Book : 
" Item the ijd groom of the 
warderobe for the beddis, who is 
hourely in the warderobe for 
It/ring^ sewing, and jouning of 
stuf." Ed. 1827, p. 326. 

Linches for the king's car, 123. 

Lymour, a crupper for the, 123 

bolt for the king's car 

123. 

saddle, a pair of Ly- 
mour hamys, 123. 

Malter, John, 121. 
A smith. 

Mantle, a, 117. 

Mantles of the Order of the 
Garter, 124, 161. 

laces of, 136. 

Marriages, gowns given on, 157. 
It was a common practice for su- 
periors to present their depen- 
dants with gowns on their mar- 
riages, and an instance of it oc- 
curs in the Privy Purse Expenses 
of Elizabeth of York, p. 49. 

Massy, John, 121. 
A lawyer. 

Medicines, Holland cloth, to 
make necessary things for the 
king's, 147. 

Probably to serve as bandages, or 
to be made into lint. 

Milan harness, 124. 
See HARNESS. 

Mille, Edmond, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 
wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Misterton, William, 128, 169. 
Clerk of the Great Wardrobe : 
his wages were I2d. a-day. On 
the accession of Henry VII., 
he obtained a new grant of 
his situation. In the act of 
Resumption of the 1st Henry 
VII., he was protected in the en- 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



251 



joyment " of the office of Clerk 
of the Great Wardrobe with the 
wages of I2d. by the day, and 
liveries for clothing for himself, 
for winter and summer, and 
clothing towards the finding of a 
clerk under him in the said of- 
fice," which had l>een granted to 
him by letters patent dated 21 
Nov., 1 Henry VII. Rot. Par/. 
vi., 344. 

Montpelier, a merchant of, 115. 

velvet, 116. 

Montgomery, Sir Thomas, 162. 
Sir Thomas Montgomery was the 
son of Sir John Montgomery, 
Knt., by Elizabeth, sister of 
Ralph Lord Sudley, who also 
married Sir John Norbury. He 
was a distinguished person in 
the reign of Henry VI. and Ed- 
ward IV., and was honoured 
with the Order of the Garter for 
his fidelity and services to the 
latter monarch. In the 28th 
Henry VI., by the description 
of " Thomas Montgomery, the 
younger, Esquire," he was protect- 
ed in the Act of Resumption in the 
enjoyment of all gifts and grants 
made to him, "so that our said 
grauntes exceed not xxiij ti. yerly, 
the which we wol he have and re- 
joice according to our lettres pa- 
tentes made unto him, consider- 
yng that he is a yonger brother, 
and hath no thyng to lyve upon, 
savyng ooiily of ouregift." Rot. 
Part, v., 193. In the 1st Edward 
IV. he was a knight and one of 
the king's carvers, with a fee of 
401. a-year. Ibid., 475. On the 
accession of Henry VII., he was 
secured in the possession of all 
grants made to him by Edward 
IV. Ibid., vi., 359, and died 
about 1489. On the 28th of July, 
in that year, he made his will, 
from which it appears that he was 
twice married, first to Philippa, 
and secondly to Lady Lora, who 
was the widow of John Blount, 
third Lord Montjoy, but he had 
no issue. In the Sumptuary Act 
of the 22d Edward IV., Mont- 
gomery and his friend, Sir Tho- 
mas Burgh, whom he constituted 
one of his executors, and six or 



seven other favourites of the 
king, were specially exempted 
from its provisions, they being 
permitted by it to wear cloth 
and fur, purple and cloth of gold 
only excepted. Rut. Parl., vi., 
221. 

More, John, 164. 

Morice, Davy, 164. 

Two of the persons appointed to 
wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Mustrevilliers, cloth of, 115, 169, 
170. 

Apparently cloth made at a place 
so named in France. The article 
is thus mentioned in the Paston 
Letters in the reigns of Henry 
VI. and Edward IV. : " A fine 
gown of Must' de wyllirs furred 
with fine beavers, and one pair of 
brigandines covered with blue 
velvet and gilt nails, with leg 
harness : the value of the gown 
and the brigandines 8/." Fusion 
Letters. Vol. i., p. 61. 

" My mother sent to my father 
to London for a gown cloth of 
Mustyrddevyi/ers." Ibid. p. 256. 

Nails, for, 122, 123. 

gilt, 119, 139, 144, 152. 

latis, 122. 

Napkins, 131, 139. 

Needles, 128. 

Nevelle, John, 164. 

Newham, Ralph, 164. 

Two of the persons appointed to 
wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Norton, William, 127. 
A carpenter. 

Officers of the king's wardrobe, 
summer clothing of seven, 
169, 170. 

Oriel, William, mercer, 132. 
Ostrich feathers, 119,138, 148. 
An ostrich feather then cost ten 
shillings. 

Ostrich board, cupboards made 
of, 131. 

Wainscot. Kennett's Parochial 

Antiquities. The word occurs in 

the will of William Bruges, Gar- 

2 K 2 



25* 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



ter King of Arms in 1449. " I 
ordeyn that the i j chapelles of our 
Lady and Seynt George wythyn 
the seyd chirch of Seynt George 
be closed wyth ostrich boarde, and 
clere storied, after such quantite 
as the closure of pleyn horde there 
now conteineth ;" and in the 
Churchwarden's Accounts of St. 
Mary Hill, London, " 1485, for 
tymbre and estrichborde for gynnes 
and wyndowes;" "1481, A 
standyng bed made with es- 
trychborde" " A standyng bed 
covvey with estricg horde of 
beyond see makyng." Nichols's 
Illustrations of Ancient Times, 
pp. 97, 118. This query is added 
in a note, " If the same with 
Eastland horde in the Ward, 
robe Accounts of Edward I., 
p. 119, or horde de Eastland in 
the Fcedera, iv., 730." To the 
word " oster bord," which also 
occurs in the Churchwarden's 
Accounts of St. Mary Hill, Dr. 
Pegge has added this note: 
" Query Easter, from esterych, 
i. e., wainscot." Ibid., p. 263. 

Parformed, 143. 

" The valance of the sparver of 
velvet, white and blue, and par- 
fourmed with white satin." In 
this sense " parfonned" seems to 
mean made up, fitted up, com- 
pleted. Palsgrave renders " par- 
forme by " parfournys" as well 
as by "je parforme." It seems 
in one instance to be used in this 
sense by Chaucer, 

" For threttene is a Covent as 

I gesse, 
Your confessour here for his 

worthinesse, 

Shal parfourme up the noumbre 
of his Covent." Somptours Tale, 
1. 7843. See PERFORMING, 
p. 213, ante. 
Paillet, 124, 131, 137. 

Pallets, small beds, so called from 
their being generally stuffed with 
straw. The ticks only, which 
were made of busk, are mentioned 
in these Accounts : 

" on a paillet all that 

glade night, 

By Troilus he laie." Troilus 
and Cressida, book iii., 1. 229. 



In the inventory of Sir John 
Fastolf's effects, among feather 
beds, bolsters, materases, quilts, 
&.C., in the chamber of Lady Mi- 
licent Fastolf are " ij smale pay- 
letts." Archceologia, xxi., p. 269. 
" The beddes and pay letts in the 
king's chamber." Liber Niger 
damns regis Edward. IV., p. 22. 
Certain officers were to have 
" russhes and litter for theyre 
payletts.''' Ibid., p. 40. 

" Stuffe for the pallet t bedd," 
" a mantle for the queene to 
weare about her in her pallet; 
and other things necessarie for the 
same pallett." Articles for the 
Regulation of Henry Vllth's 
Household, p. 125, 126. A pallet 
bed stood near the state or larger 
bed in the chamber in which 
the queen was confined. " In the 
chamber where the queen is to 
be delivered there must be a 
royall bedd therein, the flore 
laid with carpeth over and over, 
with a faire pallett bed, with all 
the stuff belonging thereto, with 
a rich sperver hanging over," 
" a pallett by the bed arrayed ac- 
cording to the bedd, with sheets 
and paine, except the cloth of 
gold on the paine to be of ano- 
ther colour than that of the great 
bedd, and over the pallett a large 
sparver of crimson satin, &c." 
Ibid., p. 125. 

Paled, 118, 132, 137, 140, 142, 
143, 144. 

Paleways, or in perpendicular 
lines. The word is explained in 
Todd's Johnson " striped, from 
pale in heraldry." 
Palfreys, 153. 
Panes, 118, 137. 

Variegated, composed of small 
squares, generally applied to 
counterpanes. It would appear 
from p. 138 that " Pane" meant 
any small division, written in the 
form of a square or not. See p. 
65 and 213 ante. 
Paper, 128. 

black, 125. 

Paris and filyn, story of, worked 
on arras, 132, 136, 142. 
The inventory of the effects of 
Henrv V. on the Rolls of Parlia- 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



ment, iv., 230, et seq., present 
an idea of the various subjects 
which were represented on arras 
and tapestry in the fifteenth 
century. 

Parker of Dover, 164. 

William, 164. 

Two of the persons appointed to 
wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Parr, Sir William, 159. 

Son and heir of Sir John Parr. 
He was born in 1434, and having 
distinguished himself in the ser- 
vice of Kdward IV., particularly 
at Barnet field, he was made a 
knight banneret, honoured with 
the Garter, and was comptroller 
of the king's household at that 
monarch's decease, whose funeral 
he attended. Sir William married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Lord Fitz 
Hugh, by whom he was father 
of Sir Thomas, and of William 
Baron Parr of Horton. Sir Tho- 
mas, the eldest son, was father 
of Queen Katherine Parr, and of 
William Earl of Essex and Nor- 
thampton. 

Patens, pairs of, of leather, 119, 
138, 146, 147. 
Paten for a fote, galoche. Pah- 
grave. A pair then cost one shil- 
ling. 

Paylets. 

SeePAILLETS. 

Phillip, Agrieys, 123. 

Thomas, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 
wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Pillion, to make a, for the 
Duchess of Burgundy, 163. 

Fis candle, 121. 

Although numerous examples of 
the use of the term " P'is 
candle," " Paris candle," " Peris 
candle," and " Parisch candle" 
have been found, its precise mean- 
ing has not been ascertained. 
" Prociphis,discis,platellis, salsar, 
candel parts' et quatuour lib' cere 
ad celebracionem divinorum in 
capella, emptis'," &c. Wardrobe 
Accounts of the 28th Edward I., 
p. 137. The editor of that work 
erroneously guesses that it 



meant either a pair of candle- 
sticks, or "Parisian," as Paris, 
he adds, " is 201bs. weight or mea- 
sure," but the authority for the 
assertion does not bear out the 
inference, for " Paris" in the 
passages cited [page 351] clearly 
refers to 20/. of money, i.e., money 
struck at Paris which was worth 
a fourth more than that struck 
at Tours. Roquefort in voce 
" Parisis." 

" Of parisch candle viij doson 
Ib. after xij d. the dosson." Nor- 
thumberland Household Book, p. 2. 
" To make provision for iiij score 
xj dosson ij Ib. of parisch candle 
for the expensys of my house for 
one hole yere after xij d. the 
dosson," Ibid. p. 14. " The ser- 
geant of the bakehouse etith in 
the hall : his iyverey for all nyght 
is one gallon ale ; wynter Iyverey, 
one candyll wax, ij candy lies peris', 
one talwood, one litter and 
russhes," &c., " vj candelles wax, 
viij peris' 1 , viij tallowe." Liber 
Niger Domus Regis Edw. IV., 
1790, 4to., p. 56', 69. " Candells 
peris," or " candelles perich,'" are 
often mentioned in other parts of 
those regulations, pp. 43, 44, 45, 
&c. Peris' candles are not no- 
ticed in the Regulations for the 
Royal Household in any other 
place than in the Liber Niger 
above cited, but the same article 
seems to be meant by " white 
lights," in the Regulations of 
the Households of George Duke 
of Clarence, 9th Edward IV., 
and of Henry VII., A. 1494. 
" The groome porter shall fetche 
noe woode, white lightes, ne wax," 
&c., pp. 90, 103, 141. 

Pillows, 131, 137. 

beres of Holland cloth, 

131, 137, 140. 

Pillow cases. The word occurs 
in Chaucer, and in many early 
writers. " In his male he had a 
pi/we here.'" Pro/off. Cant. Tales, 
1. 696. 

Pointmaker, John, 120. 
A pointer of laces. 

Points of various kinds, 117, 

120, 130, 136, 149, 150, 166. 

Points, or short tagged laces, 



254 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



were strings or fastenings for 
hosen. " Poynt for ones hose, 
esquilette." Palsgrave. Those 
mentioned in these accounts were 
generally of silk riband, pointed 
with agletes of laton. Among 
the effects of Henry V. were 
380 " poyntes d'argent dorr'," 
which were valued at 21. Is. 4d. ; 
and seventeen small points, and 
twelve large and six bosses " d' ar- 
gent ennorez sauns laces." Rot. 
Parl. iv., 223, 225. 

Powderings, 150. 

made of bogy leggs, 



116. 



of shanks, 134. 



Small pieces of fur powdered 
or sprinkled on others resem- 
bling the spots on ermine. Pals- 
grave has " powdred armijns a 
furre, peau de ermyns." 

Powdered meant sprinkled 
over, and " powdered beef," i.e., 
beef sprinkled with salt, is still in 
use. William Bruges, Garter 
King of Arms, in his will in 
1449, bequeaths " a chesible dia- 
cones, for decones, or frees of 
white clothe of gold powdred 
with garters." " A pair of vest- 
ments of white damask, powdered 
with bears and ragged staves of 
gold," Will of Elizabeth Lady 
Latimer, 1480. Testamenta Ve- 
tusta, pp. 266, 356, and many 
other instances might be cited. 
See Index to that work, pp. 853, 
855, 857. 
Puke, 120, 148, 150, 151. 

Puke is explained in Todd's John- 
son, to mean a colour "between 
black and russet, now called puce, 
and which is proved by the ex- 
amples there cited ; but it is ma- 
nifest, from these entries, that it 
also meant a particular kind of 
cloth : " hosen of puke ;" iij 
quarters puke for to make iij 
paire of hosen ;" " hosen ij paire 
grene," " ij paire blac puke." 
From the manner in which the 
word occurs in the History of Hen- 
grave, it is doubtful whether it 
there means the colour or the ma- 
terial, for immediately after 
gowns of scarlet, violet, sad-co- 
lour, and russet, follow " an olde 
gowne of puke furred with 



badger coarse;" " an olde gowne 
of puke forefaced with velvitt, 
and lyned with satten of cypress." 
p. 117- 
Pursuivant. 

See HASTINGS. 

Pykering, John, 116. 

Citizen and mercer of London. 

Pyne, Thomas, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 
wait on the Duchess of Burgundy. 

Queen, the, a gown given to, 

159. 
her chamber in the Great 

Wardrobe, 127. 
Quarterons, i.e., quarters, 153. 

Ratcliff, Sir James, 164, 165. 

Knight of the king's body. He 
was appointed to attend on the 
Duchess of Burgundy on her 
visit to this country, and received 
a yard of blue and a yard of 
purple velvet for his jacket on the 
occasion. Sir James bore the 
banner of Our Lady at the fune- 
ral of Edward IV Archceologia, 
i., 350. 

Rawson, Richard, alderman of 
London, 116. 

Ray velvet, 132, 136, and sespe. 
Striped velvet. " To my Lord 
Percy for his lyvery a yerde of 
narowe violet cloth and a yerde of 
narow rayd cloth." Northumber- 
land Household Book, p. 347. 

Rentgeder of the wardrobe, 170. 
The rent-gatherer. 

Repairs of the tenement be- 
longing to the wardrobe, 127. 

Reynford, Humphrey, 164. 

One of the persons sent to attend 
on the Duchess of Burgundy. 

Ribands, various, 117, 118, 136, 
140, 142, 143, 144, 149, 150, 
166. 
Richmond, Roger, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 
wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Rings of various kinds, 119, 
126,138, 144. 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



255 



Either, William, 163. 

One of the individuals sent to 
wait on the Duchess of Burgundy. 
From his being allowed a servant 
he must have been a person of 
condition, and was probably the 
William Ryder, one of the yeo- 
men ushers who attended Ed- 
ward's funeral. Arckceologia, i., 
353. 

Rivers, Earl, 161, 163. 

Anthony Wydville Lord Scales, 
second Earl Rivers, K.G., the 
king's brother-in-law; he was 
beheaded 1483, and died s. P. 

Robeux, query rubbish, 121. 

Robes, furring the king's, 120. 

office of the, 146. 

Roses, embroidered on various 
articles, 117, 118, 119, 136, 
137, 143, 144,152. 
The frequent occurrence of a rose 
is explained by its being the fa- 
vourite badge of the house of 
York. 

Rudde, 117. 

Ruddeur, garters of, 124, 136, 
161. 

No other example of the use of 
the word " rudde" has been found, 
excepting in Chaucer, and where 
it is presumed to mean com- 
plexion. 

" His lippes red as rose, 
His rudde is like scarlet in 
grain, &c." Rime of Sir 
Thopas, 13657 5 and in a similar 
sense in the Miller's Tale. 

" His rode was red his eyen 
grey as goos," 1. 3317. 

In these accounts rudde and rud- 
deur evidently meant the material 
of which the garters were made. 

Rushes, burdens of, 121, 126, 

Rooms were strewed with rushes 
so lately as the reign of Elizabeth. 
Archdeacon Nares in his Glossary 
has cited many passages from our 
early poets on the subject. 

Ryder, Thomas, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 
wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 



Rysley, John, 158. 

An esquire of the king's body: 
he attended Edward IV. 's fune- 
ral. Archaohgia, i., 350, 352. 

In the Act of Resumption 13th 
Edward IV., a John Rysley, 
Esq. was protected from its ef- 
fects, and he was probably the Sir 
John Rysley, Knight, whose at- 
tainder in the 1st Richard III. was 
reversed in the 1st Henry VII., 
and who was steward of the fran- 
chises of the Duchy of Lancaster 
in the counties of Herts and 
Essex, &c. ; was one of the 
king's feoffees 7th Henry VII. ; 
and who is afterwards often men- 
tioned on the Rolls of Parlia- 
ment. /fo/. Parl., vi., 84, 274, 
355, 444, 473, 474, 510,540, 531. 

Sables, 120, 129, 134, 148. 

Saddles, for making, 125. 

of estate, 154. 

covering of, 154, 155. 

Saddlers, 125. 

St. Andrew, church of, near 
Baynard's Castle, 127. 

Sambrooke, Henry, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 
attend on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Sand, 127. 

Sarsenetts, for, 116, 117, 124, 
125, 129, 133, 135, 141, 144, 

147, 148, 156, 167. 

Satins, 115, 116, 129, 133, 146, 

148, 149, 150,156, 157,158, 
161, 165, 166, 167. 

seized, pursuant to a sta- 
tute, 122, 133. 
Scales, pair of, 131. 
Scarlet cloth, 115, 133, 143. 

twelve yards of, to a 

yeoman of the crown to per- 
form the king's pleasure, and 
to deliver it to such persons 
as the king had commanded 
him, 162. 

This present seems to have been 
a secret one. 
Scopeham, Richard, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 



256 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Servants, the king's, appointed 
to attend the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy, 163, 164. 
All of them received jackets of 
woollen cloth of the royal livery, 
murrey, and blue. 

Selys, goldsmith, 119. 
Shanks, 134. 

Skins of the legs of animals. 
Shapster, Alice, 122. 

Apparently a sempstress and 

laundress. 

Sheldone, Richard, 170. 

One of the auditors of the Ex- 
chequer. See CLERK, ante. 

Sheets of various sizes and 
kinds, 121, 122, 124, 130, 
132, 135, 140, 141, 143, 144, 
149,150, 151, 152. 

See HEAD SHEETS and FOOT 

SHEETS. 

Shirts, 148, 166. 

for making and washing, 

122. 
Shoon, shoes of various kinds 

and prices, 118, 138, 146, 

147, 148, 149,151, 157,159, 

166. 

Shukburgh, William, 141. 
A mercer. 

Silks, 115, 129, 130, 143, 149, 
152, 156, 158. 

sewing, 117, 136. 

Skins, divers, 116. 

Skinners, wages of, 120, 128. 

Skinnery, office of the, 131, 137, 
146. 

Slippers, 118, 138, 148, 166. 

Sloppes of various kinds, 118, 
138, 146, 147, 148, 151. 
Slops are explained in most glos- 
saries and dictionaries to mean 
trowsers, and there can be as little 
doubt of the fact, as that in the 
reign of Edward IV., slop was 
also the name of a kind of shoe. 
That they were not slippers is 
evident, as shoon, slops, and slip- 
pers occur in the same entries as 



distinct articles. Palsgrave in 
1530 has " sloppe anight gown ;" 
and " sloppes hosyn," which he 
translates by " brayes a mari- 
nier," thus agreeing with the 
generally received meaning of the 
word at present. Sloppes is twice 
used by Chaucer, and each time 
for a sort of breeches. Sloppe 
likewise meant " a mourning 
cassocke for ladies and gentlemen, 
not open before, and it thus oc- 
curs in " liveries for noblemen 
and gentlemen" at funerals : " a 
duke to have for his gowne, sloppe, 
and mantell sixteen yards ;" the 
same quantity was allowed for the 
"gown, slop, and mantle" of a 
marquis, and fourteen yards for 
those of an earl, but a viscount 
was only allowed cloth for his 
gown and mantle, and no allow- 
ance was made for sloppes to any 
inferior person. Strutt's Dresses 
and Habits, ii., 323. See also 
pp. 337, 338. In p. 345, he cites 
the entries in these Accounts to 
prove that the ancient estivales 
or buskins were what was then 
meant by slops. 

Shoon, sloppe, and botews are 
frequently mentioned in the ac- 
count of articles delivered from 
the Great Wardrobe for the coro- 
nation of Richard III. Antiqua- 
rian Repertory, ed. 1807 5 vol. i., 
pp: 42, 50, &c. 

Smiths, 127. 

Smythson, Thomas, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 
wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Socks, 118, 138, 148. 

See p. 223, ante. 

Spangles, 115, 119, 124, 138, 
153. 

See p. 223. 

Sparowe, Thomas, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 
attend the Duchess of Burgundy. 

Sparvers, 129, 131, 132, 135, 
142, 143, 144. 

A sparver is said by Archdeacon 
Nares " to be the canopy or tes- 
tor of a bed," which agrees with 
the passages he has cited : 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



257 



as quiet sleeps in a bed of cloth as 
under a sparver of tisshue." Ha- 
ringfon. "In silken sparvers, beds 
of down." Ibid. ; and with the no- 
tices of a sparver in the Regu- 
lations for " the Deliverance of a 
Queene temp. Henry VII.," but 
which is there erroneously printed 
"sperwer ;" " a royal bedde, with a 
faire pallett bedde with a rich 
sperver hanging over." " Over 
the pallett a large sperver of 
crimson satin, with a bowle of 
gould or silver and guilt ; and 
above the openinge of the same 
sperver to be embrothered the 
king's and queen's armes, and 
the residue withcrownes of gold." 
p. 125. See also pp. 126, 127. 

At the conclusions of directions 
for making the king's bed, temp. 
Henry VIII., printed in that 
volume, is this passage, "And so 
then every of them sticke up the 
aungel about the bedde and to 
lette downe the corteyns of the 
sayd bedde or sparver?' Archce- 
ologia, iv., 313, where a sparver 
is erroneously explained to be "a 
camp or turn-up bed." 

Ann, Duchess of Buckingham, 
in 1480, bequeathed a sparver of 
red velvet party gold with a 
counterpart to the same of scar- 
let. And Sir Edward Poinings, 
in his will in 1521, speaks of " a 
sparver of silk with curtains of 
the same." 

Among the effects of Henry 
V. was an " Esparver palez de tar- 
tarin vert, blanc et vermaille, de 
novel facion pris 40s." Rot. Parl., 
iv. 231. The notices of sparvers 
in these Accounts afford a perfect 
idea of their appearance, and 
prove that they were, in fact, the 
whole of the frame work of a bed 
to which the curtains, valances, 
&c., were attached, and were not 
the canopy or tester only. See 
more particularly the description 
of them in pages 142, 143. 

Speringchain, for the king's car, 

123. 
Sprigs for, 122. 

A brad or nail without a head. 

Spurs, hunting, 148. 



Spurs, pairs of, of various kinds, 
119, 138, 150. 

Stable, office of the, 153. 

Standishes, with weights and 
scales, 131. 

Stanes, Thomas, porter of the 
wardrobe, 170. 

Stanley, Edward, cupbearer to 
the king, 157. 

Probably the Sir Edward Stanley 
of Hornby, fifth son of Thomas, 
first Earl of Derby, who, for his 
services at Flodden field, was 
created Lord Mounteagle in 1514 : 
he was a Knight of the Garter, 
and died in 1523. 

Stanhope, Thomas, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 
wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Staple of Calais, 133. 

Stationer, 125. 

Stomachers, 122, 148, 150, 166. 

The placard or stomacher, for the 
terms are synonymous, is an 
article of dress that frequently 
occurs in the Inventories of the 
Wardrobe of Henry VIII., in 
the Harleian MS. 1419. Half a 
yard of stuff was always allowed 
for the king's placard, and the 
same quantity for the stomacher, 
whether it belonged to the king 
or queen. The placards were 
made of cloth of gold, cloth of 
tissue, satin, and other rich ma- 
terials, and were frequently adorn- 
ed with jewels. They were used 
with the gown as well as with 
the coat and jacket, and were 
sometimes laced over it, so as to 
resemble the front of a woman's 
stays." Strutt's Dresses and Ha- 
bits, ii., 361, 376. Horda, iii., 
75, 80. Among the apparel de- 
livered to Richard III. for his 
coronation, was "a doublet made 
of two yerdes and a quarter, and 
a half of blue clothe of gold 
wroght with netts and pyne 
apples, with a stomacher of the 
same lined with oon ell of Hol- 
land cloth, and oon ell of busk, 
instede of green clothe of gold." 
Arctueologia, i., 368. 

" Four stomachers of satten of 
2 L 



258 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



carnation, crymson, white and 
blacke coloures, every of them 
lyned with the same satten," are 
mentioned in an order to deliver 
certain articles out of Henry 
VIII.'s Great Wardrobe in 1535. 
Archceologia, ix., 247- In the 
Privy Purse Expenses of Henry 
VII., 6s. 8d. are said to have been 
paid for a stomacher, and for "an 
Estrych skynne for a stomacher, 
I/. 4." It appears from these 
Accounts that stomachers were 
sometimes also made of linen, 
and were washed, as well as of 
black satin. Palsgrave translates 
" stomacher for ones brest" by 
" estomachier." 

Stirrups, 123. 

Summer clothing of divers offi- 
cers, 169. 

Certain of the officers of the 
king's household, and persons at- 
tending on his person, were en- 
titled to clothes termed liveries, 
twice in the year for winter and 
summer. 

Suns embroidered on various 
articles, 118, 137. 

See CROWNS, ante. 
Sutton, Mr., 121. 

At his house the ambassadors of 

France were lodged. 

Surcingles, 125. 

Tables, 131, 139. 

Table clothes, 131, 139. 

Tailloury, office of the, 146. 

Tallow chandler, 121. 

Tapestry, pieces of, 120, 130, 
136, 137. 

Tapettes, 143, 144. 

Tapets, it appears from p 144, was 
another name for costerings. See 
COSTERS. In the Privy Purse 
Expenses of Henry fill., A. 1, 
is an entry of 20A " for embroider- 
ing diverse lappets for the king's 
new gallery," and of 31. " for fif- 
teen tapetts made for windows in 
the Tower." Additional MS. 
in the British Museum, 7100. 
In the Inventory of Sir John 
Fastolf's effects are " ij tapettis 
with c\ow&es."-Arc/iceolngia, xxi., 



p. 265. Among the effects of 
Henry V. were numerous tapettes, 
some with curtains, and some 
without ; they were generally 
made of worsted : also tapets em- 
broidered with various histories 
and legendsRot. Par/., iv., 231 , 
et seq. 

Joan Lady Bergavennyin 1434 
bequeathed a bed of velvet white 
and black paled, with cushions, 
tapettes, and forms that belong to 
the same bed, and another bed 
of blue baudkin, with cushions, 
tapettes of worsted and forms, 
&c. 

Tapet hooks, 120, 121, 138, 
145. 

Hooks belonging to tapets. 
Tartarin, 117, 129, 135, 169. 
Tassels, 117, 125, 136, 152. 
Tawyer, a, for tawing of furs, 
121. 

" Tawer, a dresser of leather." 
" To taw, to dress white leather, 
commonly called alum leather, in 
contradistinction from tan leather, 
that which is dressed with bark." 
Todd's Johnson. 

" I tawe leather as a curryer 
doeth, je courroye. This oxe hide 
is not well tawed." "I/atoeathyng 
that is styffe to make it soft, je 
souple. It is styffe yet, but tawe 
it a lytell " Palsgrave. In the 
sense in which taw is used in 
these accounts it appeal's to mean 
dressing furs. 

Tay, , esquire of the body, 
164, 165. 

He was appointed to wait on the 
Duchess of Burgundy, and re- 
ceived a complete harness and 
materials for his jacket, on the 
occasion. He was probably the 
William Tay, Esq., son and heir 
of Robert Tay, who obtained a 
license from the king in the 23d 
Edward IV.-Calend. Rot. Patent., 
p. 327. 
Taylor, sergeant, 155. 

George Lufkyn. 

Taylors, wages of, 120, 128. 
Tentor hooks, 120, 138, 145. 
Testours of sparvers, 132, 141, 
142, 143. 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



259 



Thread, 118, 125, 128, 131, 
140, 142, 143, 144, 146, 149, 
151. 

Thorneton, William, 164. 
Thwaytes, Thomas, 164. 

Two of the persons appointed to 
wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Ticks for beds, 118, 130, 137. 
Timbres of skins, 129, 133, 150. 
A timber is forty skins. Blount. 

Tippets of black velvet, 146, 
149, 151, 166. 

See p. 227. 

Titus Livius, a book so called, 
125, 152. 

See BOOKS. 
Tod, Richard, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 

wait on the Duchess of Bur- 

gundy. 

Topfeld, John, 168. 

One of the king's footmen. 

Towels, 131, 138. 

Travasses, or travers, 126, 132, 
136, 142, 144. 

A kind of screen with curtains, 
used in chapels, halls, and other 
large rooms. In the account of 
the ceremony of " creepinge to 
the crosse" traverses are thus no- 
ticed : 

" First the king to come to the 
chapel or closet, and there to tarry 
in his traverse until the bishop," 
&c. ; " and this done the queen 
shall come downe out of her closet 
or traverse into the chapel," &c., 
and then go again to her closet or 
traverse. Northumberland House- 
hold Book, ed. 1827, p. 436, 437. 
Dr. Nicholas West, in a letter to 
Henry VIII., says, " Wednesday 
I went to Holyrode House wher 
the kyng herd masse in a chapell 
without any traverse" which the 
editor erroneously explains to be 
" a retired seat with lattice 
work." Ellis's Original Letters, 
First Series, i., 68. 

" The clerke of the closette 
prepareth all thinges for the 
stuffe of the aultres to be redy, 
and taking upp the traverse; 



laying the cusshyns necessary for 
the king and the chapleyns," 
&c. Liber Niger Domus Regis 
Edward. IV., p. 51. 

" We will that our sonne in 
his chambre and for all night 
lyverye to be sette, the traverse 
drawne anone upon eight of the 
clocke ; and all persons from 
thence to be avoided." Regula- 
tions for the Household of Ed- 
ward Prince of Wales, 13th 
Edward IV., p. 28. Traverses oc- 
cur among the effects of Henry V. 
in the Rolls of Parliament. Cicely, 
Duchess of York, in 1495 gave 
her son William a traverse of 
white sarsinet, and to her daugh- 
ter Katherine a traverse of blue 
satin ; and Katherine Lady Hast- 
ings in 1503 bequeathed a tra- 
verse of blue sarsinet. 

Trays for horses, garnished, 123. 

Treasurer, under, the, 14 L 
John Wood. 

Trestels, 131, 138. 

Trussing, 145. 

See pages 228 and 246. 

Underwood, Ralph, 121. 
A wire-drawer. 

Ustewaye, Thomas, 164.. 

One of the persons appointed to 
wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Utnard thread, 118. 

Utter margin, 149, i. e., lower 
margin, see p. 155. 

Vaghan, Thomas ap Roger, 165. 
One of the gentlemen appointed 
to wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Valances, 132, 142, 143. 

Vere, Lord George, 131. 

Probably Sir George Vere, bro- 
ther of John, thirteenth Earl of 
Oxford, and father of John, four- 
teenth earl. He was a person of 
some importance, but no cause 
has been discovered which ex- 
plains the reason of escutcheons 
of his arms being in the Great 
Wardrobe. 

Velvets, 115, divers kinds of, 
2 L 2 



260 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



116, 125, 129, 132, 134,146, 
147,148, 149, 150, 151,152, 
153, 154, 155, 156, 157,158, 
159, 161, 165, 166, 167. 

Venice gold, 136, 163. 

Verdours, 121, 137, 146. 

A particular kind of stuff, per- 
haps green baize ; but the word 
has not been found in any glos- 
sary. Lady Hastings in 1503 
bequeathed " all the pieces of 
hangings of verd that now hang 
in niy chamber and in the par- 
lour." 

Veysy, Alice, 127. 
A tradeswoman. 

Violet, ingrain, 169. 

Vraulx, Piers de, 115. 

A merchant of Mountpelier in 
Gascony. 

Wages of divers persons, 120, 
127, 128. 

Wales, Edward, Prince of, 160. 
Afterwards Kjng Edward V., 
whose unhappy fate renders him 
one of the most interesting per- 
sonages in our history. This en- 
try relates to the delivery of five 
yards of white cloth of gold tis- 
sue for a gown for him. He was 
at that time about ten years of 
age, having been born on the 14th 
November 1470. 

Walforde, John, 164. 

Walker, Henry, 164. 

Walyngton, Osborne, 164. 

These three persons were ap- 
pointed, with several others, to 
wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy on her visit to this coun- 
try. 

Wards, clothing of the king's, 

155, 165. 
Wardrobe, clerk of the, 169. 

William Misterton. 
keeper and clerk of, 

his fees, 128. 

porter of, 170. 



Thomas Stanes. 
rent gatherer of man- 
sions and tenements belong- 
ing to the, 170. 



Wardrobe, revenues of the, 115. 

yeomen tailors of, 

170. 

William Dunkan, William Halle. 

Warner, James, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 
wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Warwick, Earl of, 157, 158. 

Edward Plantagenet, the king's 
nephew, son and heir of George, 
Duke of Clarence. This young 
prince bore the title of Warwick, 
probably in right of his grand- 
mother, Anne, wife of Richard 
Nevill, who was created Earl 
of Warwick to him and his heirs 
by the said Anne in 1449. Hewas 
then about ten years of age, and 
appears to have been clothed at 
the king's expense, though the 
only notice of him in these ac- 
counts is the delivery of shoes 
and boteuz for his use. An ob- 
ject of suspicion both to Richard 
III. and Henry VII., he was im- 
prisoned by each; and he ultimate- 
ly fell a victim to the jealousy of 
the latter monarch on a charge of 
high treason, being beheaded on 
Tower Hill 28th November, 
1499, aged twenty-nine. In him 
expired the last male of the house 
of Plantagenet. 

Washing, for, 121. 

Water flowers, 115, 119. 

Ornaments made in the form of 
water flowers. There is cause to 
believe that a water flower was 
the badge of Elizabeth Wydville, 
queen of Edward IV., as the 
back ground of her arms in the 
window of the north transept of 
Canterbury Cathedral is semee 
of flowers gules, stemmed and 
leaved vert. Willement's He- 
raldic Notices of Canterbury Cat he- 
drai, p. 35. If these flowers were 
intended for water flowers, the use 
of ornaments in that form is at 
once accounted for. Water flowers 
seem, however, to have been a 
favourite device about this period, 
as Margaret, Duchess of Norfolk, 
in 1490, bequeathed her daughter 
Marney " a chain of water- 
flowers." 



INDEX AND NOTES. 



261 



Watermen, 122. 
Wax, sealing, 128. 
Weights and scales, 131. 
White, William, 121. 
A tallow-chandler. 

Whitfeld, Nicholas, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 
wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Williams, Thomas, parson of St. 
Andrews, near Baynard's 
Castle, 127. 
Wilshawe, John, 164. 
Wilson, Robert, 164. 

Two of the persons appointed to 
attend on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Windsor Castle, College of Our 
Lady within, 156, 158, 159. 

Wire drawer, a, 121. 

for, 121. 

Wode, John, under-treasurer, 
140. 

Wombes, 129, 134. 

Query, the belly part of skins. 

Woollen cloth, 129, 134. 

given to make 

blankets, 144. 

Worsley, James, 164. 

One of the persons appointed to 
wait on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. 

Worsted of various assizes and 
sorts, 117, 129, 132, 135, 
140, 141. 

Wratone, Piers, 145. 
Yeoman of the beds. 

Wydeville, Sir Edward, 164, 
165. 

One of the knights of the king's 
body, who was appointed to at- 
tend on the Duchess of Bur- 
gundy. He was probably the 
uncle of the queen whom Dug- 
dale says is generally but errone- 
ously called " Lord Wydville." 
He was keeper of the town and 
castle of Porchester in the 19th 



Edward IV., and was slain in Brit- 
tany in July A 3, Henry VII., 
being then governor of the Isle 
of Wight, in which year he was 
elected a Knight of the Garter, 
but was never installed. Though 
called the brother of Richard 
Earl Rivers, it is much more pro- 
bable that he was his younger 
son, the Sir Edward Wydville, 
brother of Anthony, second Earl 
Rivers, who is mentioned in that 
nobleman's will in 1483. Hall, 
however, describes him as the 
queen's uncle, and calls him a 
" valiant captain and a bold 
champion." Ed. 1809. 439. 

Wyngfeld, Dame Ann, 157. 

Query if Ann, daughter of Lord 
Audley, and wife of Sir John 
Wingfield, who was sheriff of 
Norfolk in the 1st Richard III., 
and 8th Henry VII., and father 
of Sir Anthony Wingfield, E.G., 
and ancestor of the baronets of 
that name. 

Yeoman of the crown, a, 162. 

York, Richard, Duke of, 155, 
156, 160, 161. 
Richard Plantagenet, the king's 
second son, who is supposed to 
have been murdered in the Tower 
with his brother, Edward the 
Fifth. This unfortunate young 
prince, who was born at Shrews- 
bury, was about eight years 
of age when the articles here 
noticed were delivered for his 
use. On the 15th January 1477, 
he married Ann Mowbray, the 
daughter and sole heiress of John 
Duke of Norfolk, &c., and was 
created Duke of Norfolk, his 
titles being, in the 19th Edward 
IV., " Duke of York and Nor- 
folk, Earl Warren, Surrey, and 
Nottingham, Earl Marshal, and 
Marshal of England, Lord Se- 
grave, Mowbray, and Gower, 
Lieutenant of Ireland." He was 
made a Knight of the Garter, 
and one of the entries in these 
Accounts is for the delivery of the 
robes of the Order. 






ADDITIONAL NOTES. 



CARS, CHAIRS, LITTERS, CHA- 
RIOTS, and WAINS. 
One of the very few papers of 
any value in the Archceologia, is 
an essay on the early use of car- 
riages in England, in the 20th 
volume, by Mr. Markland, and 
to which reference may be re- 
commended for valuable infor- 
mation. The only carriages no- 
ticed in these Accounts, or in the 
Wardrobe Accounts of Edward 
IV., are 

The Queen's Charre, for which 
axletrees, nails, grease, stirrups, 
and five yards of cotton russet, 
&c., were bought in March 1503, 
pp. 103,104. 

The close car of the Queen's 

wardrobe, pp. 16, 34, 46. 
The Wain, p. 46. 
The Chariot, p. 51. 
The King's Car, in 1480, pp. 

122, 123, 125. 

A Litter of blue velvet lined 
with sarcenet, with blue da- 
mask cushions, and bordered 
with satin figure, given to a 
Spanish lady, p. 69. Iron 
pins for the litter, p. 45. 
A covering for a litter of 
blue cloth of gold, with 
blue damask, with chevrons 
lined with crimson damask, 
cushions, &c., p. 28. 
On each of these vehicles a few 
remarks will be submitted. 
The QUEEN'S CnARE.-Though 
sometimes confounded, a Chare 
and a Car were very different 
articles. A Char, Mr. Markland 
observes, " differed in nothing 
from the ancient horse litter, 
than in having wheels and some- 
times a roof : it is of very early 
origin in this country, and was 
probably the parent of close car- 
riages ;" he adds, " that it was 
rarely if ever used but on occa- 
sions of ceremony, or in cases of 
sickness." The Northumberland 
Household Book, and other autho- 
rities, justify however the belief 
that it was always used by ladies, 
if not by men in travelling, when 



the horse litter was not employed. 
" Horse lyters and chairs" formed 
part of the Earl of Northumber- 
land's establishment in 1512. Ed. 
1827, p- 351; and to the many 
proofs adduced by Mr. Markland, 
of the use and description of 
Chares, the following, which cor- 
roborate his statements, may be 
acceptable. In a Chronicle writ- 
ten in the 15th century, the word 
is thus used, " An. 2. Hen. VI. 
the King was borne toward his 
modir chare, and he schrikedand 
cryed, and sprang, and wolde 
nought be caryed forthere," 
"and on the Moneday he was borne 
to the Chare" " on Wednesday 
he cam to London in his moder 
barm in the Chare, rood through 
London." Chronicle of London, 
p. 112. In 1434, Joan Lady 
Bergavenny speaks in her will 
of " her hearse, her Chare, and 
other convenable piirveyance," 
being made for her funeral, and 
bequeaths to her son Sir James 
Ormond, three of her best horses 
in her Chare; to John his bro- 
ther, her next best ; and to Tho- 
mas his brother the next best after 
him ; and to John the sixth best. 
In 1495, Cecily Duchess of York, 
mother of Edward the Fourth, 
bequeathed to her daughter the 
Duchess of Suffolk, her Chair with 
the covering, ail her cushions, horses 
and harnesses for the same, with 
all her palfreys. The word also 
occurs in the account of the fu- 
neral of Edward the Fourth in a 
manner which illustrates the ar- 
ticle meant by it. " make 

an ymage like hym clothed in a 
surcote with a mantell of estate, 
the laces goodly lying on his belly, 
his sceptre in his hand, and a 
crowne on his hed, and so cary 
him in a Chare open, with lights 
and baners." ." And when the 
masse was don, and all other 
solempnite, and that the lordes 
were ready for to ryde, ther was 
ordeyned a rioall Char covered 
with blak velvet, having abive 
that a blak clothe of gold with a 



ADDITIONAL NOTES. 



263 



white cross of gold, under that a 
mageste clothe of blak sarsenet, 
drawen with vj corsers, trapped 
with blac velvet with certeyn 
scochens betyn upon sarsenet 
betyn with fine gold. Apon the 
fore horse and the thill horse sate 
ij CAaretmen, and on the iiij oder 
horse sat iiij henshmen." Archce- 
loffia, i. 349, 351. It may be 
easily imagined that Chares ad- 
mitted of ornament, and were 
often very splendid ; and in the 
preparations for the reception of 
Katherine of Arragon, in 1502, 
it was ordered that Five charres 
diversely apparelled for the ladies 
and gentlemen, be ready, whereof 
one of the chief must be richly 
apparelled and garnished for the 
Princess. 

But the most minute descrip- 
tions of Chairs occur in the Ac- 
count of Stuff delivered for the 
Coronation of Richard III. 

" The queen's ' chiefe chare' 
was covered aforehand with cloth 
of gold crymysyn of the Kyngs 
own store ; v paire of draughts 
were newe covered with xxx yerds 
of crymysyn cloth of gold," and 
" iij sadels for the same chief 
chare" were also " covered in vj 
yerds of crymysyn cloth of gold." 
" For the garnysshing of the 
said chief chare" were used 
" iij unces of ryban of venys 
gold, and ix unces j quartern of 
ryban of sylk, and ij Ib. ij unces 
frenge of silk purpull." The 
body of the second chare was 
" covered in vij yerds di of crymy- 
syn velvet, v pair of draughts 
for the same" were " covered in 
xxx yerds of crymysyn velvet :" 
the upper covering consisted of 
" xiij yerds of velvet crymysyn," 
and *' for the lyning of the chare 
barneys, for the lyning of the 
second chare within ; and for iij 
covertours of the said chief chare, 
the second chare, and the third 
chare, xxxix yerds and a quarter 
cloths" were delivered out of the 
Wardrobe. The materials for the 
third " chare" are then enume- 
rated, but differ little from the 
preceding : " iij cered cloths" are 
however noticed, as having been 



used " for to cover the said chief 
second and third chares for the 
weder," also materasses " to lye 
in the bothams of them," and 
" for the garnysshing of the for. 
saide chares xlij Ib. of small gilt 
nailles, andxc grete gilt nailles." 
Antiquarian Repertory, i., 43, 
et seq. 

THE CAR was, according to Pals- 
grave, in his Esclarcissement de 
la Langue Francoyse, printed in 
1530, " a lytell carte with two 
wheles," which agrees with the 
notices of Cars in these accounts. 
They were evidently covered 
with bare hides, and were used 
for the conveyance of light goods, 
for which purpose one was at- 
tached to the office of the Ward- 
robe of the Queen's robes; and 
in 1480, the King's carmen were 
paid a reward " for awaiteng 
uppon certen of the King's 
books, put in the King's car," 
p. 125. Whether Cars were 
ever used for conveying indivi- 
duals of rank is uncertain ; and 
from Mr. Markland's not noticing 
them, it would seem that he con- 
sidered them merely as a kind 
of cart, and consequently as not 
coming within his object. That 
a Car and Charre were distinct 
articles, is also shown by this 
entry in the Northumberland 
Household book, " My Lord usitb. 
ande acustomyth to pay yerly owt 
of his Lordship's coffures to him 
that standith chargede with the 
kepynge of his Lordshipis cariages 
yerly, viz. Horslyters, chayers, 
close carres, charryats, and cards." 
Ed. 1827, P- 351. " My Lords 
carre of Arom " is mentioned in 
the same page. It is remarkable 
that Palsgrave should give no 
other explanation of chair than 
" chayre to sytte in," whilst 
car, cart and charyett are thus 
noticed : 

" Carre, a carte, chariot. 
Carre, a lytell carte with two 

wheles, char. 
Carte, charette. 
Charret, curre. 
Charryet, chariot" 
And it is equally singular that 
the Promptorium Parvulorum in 



264 



ADDITIONAL NOTES. 



the Harleian MS. 221, which 
was compiled in 1440, contains 
no other explanation of chare, 
than Currus, Quadriga, which it 
appears was synonymous with 
charyett, whilst car and cart 
seem to have been deemed the 
same thing : 

" Carre, Carte, carrua, currus. 
Carre, or lytylle carte that oone 
hors drawythe, Monolosinus. 
Cath. (t. e. Catholicon of John 
of Genoa.) 
Chayere, cathedra. 
Chare, currus, quadriga. 
Charyett, supra in chare. 
THE LITTER, one of the most 
ancient modes of travelling, was 
continued for some time after the 
introduction of coaches, and is 
well described by Mr. Markland. 
He says, 

" Perhaps the chief distinction 
between a horse litter and a 
' chare,' in point of construc- 
tion, consisted in the former 
being without wheels. In one of 
the illustrations to Mr. Johnes's 
translation of Monstrelet, the 
plate, No. 7) (entitled ' the Entry 
of Eleanor of Austria, Queen to 
Francis I. into Toulouse,') seems 
intended to convey the represen- 
tation of a litter lashed on the 
backs of two horses, one before 
and the other behind, and covered 
by a canopy carried by eight at- 
tendants. 

" It may be further observed, 
that the litter appears to have 
been the more dignified carriage, 
and was generally used on state 
occasions only as a conveyance 
for a single personage of high 
distinction ; whilst the chare was 
employed on journeys as well as 
in processions, and usually ac- 
commodated several persons of 
inferior rank. Thus on the de- 
parture of Queen Margaret, 
daughter of Henry VII., to Scot- 
land, she is described as riding on 
a " faire palfrey," but after her 
was " convayd by two footmen 
one varey riche litere, borne by 
two faire coursers varey nobly 
drest, in the wich litere the sayd 
qwene was borne in the intrynyof 
ike good townes, or otherways to 



her good playsur." Archteologia, 
xx., 447- 

In the " Ordinance for the re- 
ceaving of a Queene, and the co- 
ronation of her," temp' Henry 
VII., A. 1494, a litter is thus 
described : 

" A Litter must be ordayned 
for her, covered with white da- 
maske or white cloth of gould, 
and the horses trapped with the 
same saddle, and with five cushens 
of the same sute, twoe longe and 
three shorte ; and in the bottom 
of the litter a materis of white, 
with damaske or white cloth of 
gould with white tartarone 
alofte." p. 123. 

In an account of the stuff de- 
livered for the coronation proces- 
sion of Anne, Queen of Richard 
III., the "lyter" in which she 
rode from the Tower to West- 
minster is described as having 
been "covered in xvj yerds and 
iij quarters of white cloth of 
gold, and lyned within with iij 
yerds of white damask of sylk 
garnyssht with iij unces di' of 
ryban of gold of venys, and ix 
unces of ryban of silk, and ij Ib. 
xij unces of frenge of white silk." 
The sadels of the same liter were 
also covered with " white cloth 
of gold," and a matras put in the 
bothom in the same liter was 
" covered in ij yerds di' and quar- 
ter of white damask and a cered 
cloth ;" two trappours for two 
coursours conveying the said liter 
are also noticed. Antiquarian 
Repertory, i., 43. 
A CHARIOT was unquestionably 
a large waggon drawn by six 
or seven horses of the stronger 
kind, called on that account 
'' large trotting horses ;" the 
chariot men or waggoners who 
accompanied it, had a nag or 
smaller horse allowed them to 
ride by its side. Northumber- 
land Household Booh, Archceologia, 
xx. 449, 450. Privy Purs- Ex- 
penses of Henry nil. p. 309. 

In the Ordinance of the House- 
hold of George, Duke of Cla- 
rence, in the 8th Edward IV., 
1469, the following provisions are 
made for the Chair, Litter, and 



ADDITIONAL NOTES. 



265 



chariot, " v carre horses and ij 
keepers'; vij charriotte horses." 

For the Princess, v coursers for 
the chaire, and to them iij groomes 
with iij hakneys ; ij coursers for 
the litter, and to them j groome 
with one hakneye. p. 99, 100. 
A WAIN does not require to be 
described. The hire of three wayns 
for carrying three tons of beer, &c. 
from Burrowbridge to Topclyf in 
1512, was eight pence for each 
wayne. Northumberland House- 
hold Book, p. 138. Sir Thomas 
Lyttelton, Knight, one of the 
Judges of the Common Pleas, 
bequeathed in 1481 to his wife, 
his best plough with all apparyl 
thereto, ten of his best plough 
oxen, and his best wain, and to 
William Lyttelton, his second 
son, his second best wain, two 
ploughs and ten oxen. 

COTTON, SIR ROGER, 189. 

Sir Roger Cotton was Master of 
the Horse to the Queen, and was 
probably the husband of Margaret 
Lady Cotton so often mentioned 
in these Accounts. Leland's Col- 
lectanea, iv. 239. Both he and 



her were present at her Majesty's 
Coronation. Ibid., 232, 233. 

GREY, LADY KATHERINE, 199. 

This Lady was one of the Queen's 
Ladies of Honor. At her Ma- 
jesty's Coronation it is said that 
she and Mrs. Ditton went under 
the table, where they sat on either 
side of the Queen's feet all the 
dinner time. Ibid., 226, 233. 
GURDEN, LADY, 200. 

Probably Lady Katherine Gordon, 
daughter of the Earl of Iluntley, 
and widow of Perkiii Warbeck. 
Lady Katherine was present at 
the betrothment of the Princess 
Margaret to the King of Scots, in 
St. Paul's, in January, 1502. 
Ibid., 260. It appears from the 
notice of her in page 54, that she 
was attached to the Queen's per- 
son, and attended her into Ox- 
fordshire in November in that 
year. 

KATHERINE, LADY, 94. 

The Princess Katherine, youngest 
daughter of the Queen, in giving 
birth to whom her Majesty died. 
See KING'S DAUGHTER. 



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